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The new Machinist Manual for 2075, what info might it contain?

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  • The new Machinist Manual for 2075, what info might it contain?

    These books don't update a lot from issue to issue so I'm trying to decide if I should upgrade my 24th edition or wait until the year 2075 to be really currant. What might we be dealing with in 2075? Will it be in English or Chinese?
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  • #2
    There won't be any manual machines in 2075.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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    • #3
      Outed

      The USA will have long faced reality and "outed" itself a rabid supporter and practitioner of the Metric System.

      "Starrett" will be pronounced as "Stalett" - and velly nicely too.

      "Chingalish" versions of Amellican Machinist and Machinery's Hand Blook - published in China - will be published for Amellicans with "Good Old Amellican Iron".

      Hardinge will be re-named "Ha-Ding" and BP will be re-named "Blidgeport".

      etc.
      Last edited by oldtiffie; 05-31-2010, 11:31 AM.

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      • #4
        There will be sections on nanotechnology, Selective Laser Sintering, other forms of 3-D prototyping and multi-axis multi-beam laser machining.

        And a chapter dedicated to manual machining, one or two charts on speed/feeds... just for for historical comparison.
        This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
        Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
        Plastic Operators Dot Com

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        • #5
          Hang in

          Originally posted by Your Old Dog
          These books don't update a lot from issue to issue so I'm trying to decide if I should upgrade my 24th edition or wait until the year 2075 to be really currant. What might we be dealing with in 2075? Will it be in English or Chinese?
          Do you seriously think that you will not only live to 2075 (65 years to go) and that you will be in good enough shape to even read that book let alone understand it or get any serious amount of time of use out of it?

          The question almost suggests that you are at (or past?) the stage where you are or will get much use out of the current version.

          Who's to say that given the publishers track record thus far that they will get around to publishing another (or the next - 24th.) edition by 2075 anyway?

          Hang in there YOD!!!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Liger Zero
            There will be sections on nanotechnology, Selective Laser Sintering, other forms of 3-D prototyping and multi-axis multi-beam laser machining.

            And a chapter dedicated to manual machining, one or two charts on speed/feeds... just for for historical comparison.
            Perfect synopsis. I'd add parts sold/distributed by "Universal G-Code" that runs on turnkey CNC systems.

            Model Engineering will have been long extinct. The average age at NAMES, Harrogate (and here) is ~ 60...
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lazlo
              Perfect synopsis. I'd add parts sold/distributed by "Universal G-Code" that runs on turnkey CNC systems.

              Model Engineering will have been long extinct. The average age at NAMES, Harrogate (and here) is ~ 60...

              I doubt it. Model making will continue in all it's forms. There will always those of us who derive pleasure from making tiny working scale models out of brass and steel.

              And I also highly doubt that manual machining will ever die out. There are too many situations where you don't need/want to program a CNC mill just to make one or two parts... and CNC sucks for one-off "repair jobs."

              It'll be a specialty art like Blacksmithing is now, but it'll never be totally gone.
              This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
              Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
              Plastic Operators Dot Com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Liger Zero
                I doubt it. Model making will continue in all it's forms. There will always those of us who derive pleasure from making tiny working scale models out of brass and steel.
                Some, but it's a quickly dwindling crowd...

                Judging by the show photos, you don't seem many young folks at NAMES and Harrogate:

                Harrogate:


                NAMES:



                It'll be a specialty art like Blacksmithing is now, but it'll never be totally gone.
                By coincidence, I'm starting a semester blacksmithing class at ACC tomorrow. Like you say, it's turned into a niche art-form. Should be interesting...
                Last edited by lazlo; 05-31-2010, 12:50 PM.
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  Remember Star Trek and the matter replicator?

                  "Computer, I'd like ten quarter by twenty thread per inch socket head cap screws."

                  "Yes sir. What finish would you like?"

                  "Something corrosion resistant. Platinum will do. Make them 7 threads long."

                  . . . clinkety clink, clink.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    I can pop a damaged shaft in a lathe, set everything up and actually repair the shaft in less time than it takes to boot up the computer and set the lathe to manual.

                    Same thing with certain one-two off parts. I can stick a piece of Delrin in the lathe, get my tools set, and make the part in less time than it takes to draw, convert and drip-feed the program to the machine.

                    Same thing with the mill. Yesterday I fixed a lawnmower part for a friend. Bolt broke off in a part. Set it in the vice, milled it out, tapped it by hand and handed it back to him in less time than it takes to explain.

                    Can't do that with CNC... well you can it takes longer and would actually require me to charge for the service. In this case I have an invite to his BBQ tonight.
                    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                    Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                    Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Evan
                      Remember Star Trek and the matter replicator?

                      "Computer, I'd like ten quarter by twenty thread per inch socket head cap screws."

                      "Yes sir. What finish would you like?"

                      "Something corrosion resistant. Platinum will do. Make them 7 threads long."

                      . . . clinkety clink, clink.
                      Not in 2075. 2175... maybe. It'll be like SLS and 3D prototyping is today. We won't see it in our lifetime.
                      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                      Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                      • #12
                        I think EVAN's on the right track.
                        In 2075, most machines will probably be voice-command, or even thought-command via implanted microchip thought processing?
                        No more pounding out G-codes, or calculating feeds and speeds.
                        Kids in 2075 will say, "G-codes, Feeds & Speeds....What's THAAAAT?"
                        In 2075, just tell the machine what the material is, what the program number is, and off it goes.
                        By then they'll probably have 3D Holographic modeling as well.
                        Just think of how far computers, CNC, and tecnology in general has come in the past 30 years. Imagine the next 65 years?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          "Computer, I'd like ten quarter by twenty thread per inch socket head cap screws."
                          "Computer, what does word "screw" mean?"
                          Last edited by MichaelP; 05-31-2010, 03:39 PM.
                          Mike
                          WI/IL border, USA

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                          • #14
                            My guess is that the big change will be in the materials themselves. TiAlN-coated carbide tooling would appear almost magical to a late 19th-century machinist. If we ever find a way to manufacture large-scale objects using something like carbon nanotubes, that will change everything. Iron and steel may come to be seen as archaic as granite and marble.

                            In technological terms, I think globalization has led to a lot of stagnation in terms of production processes. Technology advances when labor becomes costly. As China advances, we will need to find new efficiencies in the use of resources including manpower. Faster computing will allow for more sophisticated forms of automation. Repair shops may become common again.

                            Conversely, if nano-assembly turns out to be workable in a serious way (I have serious doubts), then everything we know goes out the window.

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                            • #15
                              I think the Machinerys Handbook will have a large section on how to make lubricants from nuts, the petrochemical industry having been shut down in the fallout from the BP oil still of 2010.

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