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  • transmission line towers

    Walking in the noonday sun of Phoenix today I passed under a transmission line on South Mountain. I took this photo because the tower had what I thought was an awning shade over the insulators. But I suspect that isn't its purpose.

    Were you a lineman for the county? What's your theory?


    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    Stops the puking crapping buzzards from dumping on the insulators.

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    • #3
      It keeps the birds from crapping on them and shorting them out. They can't rely on rain to clean the insulators.

      Lakeside types faster...
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Did any of the other towers have them?

        Only thing I can think of is perhaps they were working on the tower structure above the lines and didn't want to drop anything on the insulators, perhaps breaking them.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        Make it fit.
        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore
          Did any of the other towers have them?
          I did notice the shades on two nearby towers. Those further in the distance I could not tell due to the angle.

          It hadn't occurred to me, but the crapping bird explanation satisfies Occam's Razor. The vultures around these parts are plentiful and well fed.
          Allan Ostling

          Phoenix, Arizona

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          • #6
            I also wondered what fabric would have been used for the shades. With the high ambient and intense solar, the surface temperature could be too hot to touch, and there would be lots of UV. Would they use fiberglass?
            Allan Ostling

            Phoenix, Arizona

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            • #7
              Dead buzzard skin............

              .
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #8
                Originally posted by John Stevenson
                Dead buzzard skin............

                .
                Maybe they sent four Mexican labourers up there to work out what to do and only one came down?
                Precision takes time.

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                • #9
                  I'm gonna go with bird doo for $300.00.
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                  • #10
                    thats a pretty fine camera / lens set-up. great detail.

                    davidh (the blind guy)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by davidh
                      thats a pretty fine camera / lens set-up. great detail.
                      Taken with my Olympus Pen E-P2, a Micro Four Thirds camera (2X crop factor), with the 14-42mm kit zoom. I have adapters so can also mount Leica, Minolta, and M42 Pentax lenses on it, using these old lenses in manual focus mode.
                      Allan Ostling

                      Phoenix, Arizona

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                      • #12
                        Solarpower panels??
                        Just my 2-cent ;-)
                        CS

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                        • #13

                          Aostling-------

                          I'll see your bird spreaders and raise you to the question of what are these thingies. Saw them on a whole bunch of power lines in the Moss Landing area south of Monterey. Can remember seeing similar contraptions around Germany.

                          Groundwater researchers in the L.A. area could always find out of the way locations, in power switching stations which always included high towers. Birds loved to roost and build nests, which invited droppings all around the tower base. Included in the droppings were palm tree seeds which would take root. If we had spare time, it was no problem to choose a select, small palm, dig it up and transplant it to our backyard. Had several beautiful palms, for those liking palms.

                          --G

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                          • #14
                            Why not phone the power company and ask them? I know that is REALLY against our creed, but you can get some surprising information that way, and then you could share it with us!
                            Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Guido
                              I'll see your bird spreaders and raise you to the question of what are these thingies.
                              I've seen them also and wondered what they are for. The best answer I ever came up with was that they were flux capacitors or part of an encabulator system.
                              Last edited by RancherBill; 06-03-2010, 10:52 PM.

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