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Where to mount a phase converter?

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  • Where to mount a phase converter?

    So, I bought a mill a couple of weeks back and the guy that sold it to me also had a brand new rotary phase converter that he had bought for the machine but never took it out of the box, so I bought that too. Where would be the best place to mount it? On the machine? On the wall near the machine? Bolted to the floor?

    Also, what size wire should I be looking at for doing the wiring? I have a 20A 220V outlet that will be feeding it.

    Thanks in advance,
    Stuart
    Stuart de Haro

  • #2
    Mount it where you wont hear it run. Some have mounted them outside under a little dog house of sorts.

    As for the wire, it will be based on the length of the run and the ambient temp that the wire will see. Find the NEC online and it will have the information there.

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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    • #3
      if you are planing on getting more machines i would get a 3ph breaker box run the converter into that then wire from that like a 3 ph. service. that way it is easy to add another machine.

      where to mount the converter well i started with it next to my desk right under the panel box. but soon did as stated above. moved it out side under its own little house.

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      • #4
        What rockrat said.

        I'd just add that in general, for 20A you need #12 wire, unless there are extenuating circumstances. For less voltage drop you could go to #10.
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          I put mine on the wall, up high. Made a sturdy shelf put some rubber feet on the motor and away it goes.

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          • #6
            How big the wire is depends on the amp draw of the mill motor and a little bit for the rotary converter.

            So, what is the amp ratting of the mill motor.

            Your not working in a library so why are you concerned about the sound of a motor running. My RPC is not so loud as to bother me and it's a 5 hp motor and you can't hear it when the mill or lathe is running. In fact, I put a lamp on the wall to let me know it's still on when I get ready to leave. I guess you could put the RPC and mill motor outside and run a belt through the wall to power the mill if you don't want the motor noise.
            It's only ink and paper

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            • #7
              I have a 5 hp Phase Converter that I mounted on a stand. It sits next to the mill so that I can reach it to turn it on or off. I built the stand out of bed frames.

              I have a 20 amp breaker on a 12 ga. line and the mill has a 3 hp induction motor. Both the RPC and the Mill motor run nicely as long as I wish without overheating.

              When running with no load, it's a little noisy, sort of a high-pitched whine. Once I turn on the motor in the Mill, it falls completely silent. It doesn't bother me at all.

              My lathe runs on 240 single-phase and I have no plans to add any more three-phase equipment. If I were to do so, I'd simply build a distribution box and feed the three-phase into that. I only operate one machine at a time.

              Here's a picture. The phase converter is to the right of the machine on the floor with the switch where I can reach it.

              The picture was taken just as I finished cleaning and painting the mill last summer. Since then, I've added a 2 axis Mitutoyo DRO and a digital Z scale as well as a 6" Kurt vise. It's working beautifully.

              A phase converter is the way to go for me since the machine is a variable. I like the idea of a VFD with frequency-controlled speeds but if one of those were to quit, I'd be lost attempting to repair it. I can fix anything on the RPC.

              Last edited by gnm109; 06-03-2010, 09:06 PM.

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              • #8
                Mine was a home built unit it was so loud when I first plugged it in I could see why it would be mounted outdoors! It was bad out of balance, so I played around with some capacitors,got everything evened out, and now it's very quite. As quite as my machine motors running. Mounted it on a thin rubber pad next to the mill, just to keep the start up force from scooting it around.
                Ted
                Last edited by mototed; 06-03-2010, 09:19 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carld
                  Your not working in a library so why are you concerned about the sound of a motor running. My RPC is not so loud as to bother me and it's a 5 hp motor and you can't hear it when the mill or lathe is running. In fact, I put a lamp on the wall to let me know it's still on when I get ready to leave. I guess you could put the RPC and mill motor outside and run a belt through the wall to power the mill if you don't want the motor noise.
                  +1 LOL!!!!

                  Mine is a home-built 5HP on a handtruck with a 20' 10ga or 8ga extension cord (I can't recall offhand which it is). I wheel it to the general vicinity of the machine I wish to run, plug the extension cord into the closest 240V outlet, plug the machine into the panel box on my RPC, and let it rip. The cord wasn't that expensive, and it saved me from having to run 10ga wiring all over from a main panel for the 3ph. I plug into 50A outlets (so I can run my stick welder from the same outlets), but my RPC is fused for 30A.

                  andy b.
                  The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

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                  • #10
                    There's loud, and there's loud......

                    I bought a 1 HP Arco a few years ago..... best investment ever.....

                    I got it pretty cheap, but when I ran it I could NOT figure out how the guy ever stood it mounted on a wall. I had it on the floor, on a board with rubber feet, wired up to a starter.

                    That thing sounded like throwing garbage cans and sheet metal down concrete stairs in an empty indoor pool area.

                    All the metal parts were loose, and the rotor had had the balance weights knocked off... It was one loud SOB. So I static balanced the rotor, tightened the sheet metal screws, and put a little strategic RTV on it.

                    Now it makes a slight hum with a few harmonics..... not bad at all, and I have it just outside the area wher the lathe is.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      Locating noisey equipment outside.

                      Mine was inside in my old shop and I hated hearing that thing run. So when I moved it got relocated outside.

                      The Shop A/C is on the right and the Rotary phase unit is shown on the left. I just poured a small concrete pad for it and covered it with an old window unit cabinet.

                      The other nuisance inside the shop was the air compressor. I moved it outside and 60ft away on the other side of the old barn.


                      Because I can’t hear it, It is often left running. I am not sure how bad this is for the electricity bill. I have been intending to tie it into the lights so that when I turn the lights off it is also turned off. Also considered putting a red pilot light near the door I go out.
                      Byron Boucher
                      Burnet, TX

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                      • #12
                        I hate mine being inside... It's not a problem when the other machines are on as the noise is masked, but when I'm trying to concentate on other tasks - most annoying.

                        The 15 hp I'm building is going outside.

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                        • #13
                          Low rpm motors are usually way less loud than 3450 rpm ones. Yet I preferred keeping my low noise 15HP 1200rpm motor out of the shop.
                          Mike
                          WI/IL border, USA

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                          • #14
                            Put it outside on rubber mounts.

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                            • #15
                              I had mine inside because I wanted the heat in winter. The noise drove me nuts, so I built an insulated (noise) box over it. Well that cooked a cap from excess heat (it was vented well but not enough)

                              Now it lives outside with a cover over it to keep rain off, been there for 3 years now and all's well.

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