Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

patching mill table

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • patching mill table

    Hey,
    I know this is opening up a can of Worms. I am styrictly a hobby "machinist" not working for those super tolerances (couldn't get them if I tried). I have a Sheldon/Vernon vertical mill that I bought from a neighbor. It has a few defects in the table none of which has affected me. One is like a giant apostroph 1/16th deep 3/4 by 1/2 inch. I came across an ad for "Alvin Lab Metal" That is machinable, sandable, drillable, tapable, fileable etc.
    What if this defect was filled with that and carefully "flattened to table??? At least it would look better and not catch as many chips. It adheres to wood, plastic, cast, all metals....what do you think?? I am not going to remove table have it welded, scraped etc. Is this a totally dumb idea???? Thanks to all that give advice. Fred

  • #2
    If you're going to do lab metal, you might as well do bondo or an epoxy filler and just sand it smooth. I don't believe that lab metal is that much stronger than an epoxy. My experience with it has not been that good.

    Hope this helps,
    Terry
    Terry

    There's only one way to find out, might as well get started now!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by laddy
      Hey,
      I know this is opening up a can of Worms. I am styrictly a hobby "machinist" not working for those super tolerances (couldn't get them if I tried). I have a Sheldon/Vernon vertical mill that I bought from a neighbor. It has a few defects in the table none of which has affected me. One is like a giant apostroph 1/16th deep 3/4 by 1/2 inch. I came across an ad for "Alvin Lab Metal" That is machinable, sandable, drillable, tapable, fileable etc.
      What if this defect was filled with that and carefully "flattened to table??? At least it would look better and not catch as many chips. It adheres to wood, plastic, cast, all metals....what do you think?? I am not going to remove table have it welded, scraped etc. Is this a totally dumb idea???? Thanks to all that give advice. Fred

      JB Weld fast-setting variety does a wonderful job on table divots. Once it sets and gets some way oil on it, you won't even notice it anymore.

      Comment


      • #4
        Why play around with plastic fillers?

        I'd drill it out with an end mill, ream it to a real close fit, and make a plug on my lathe out of mild steel bar stock round. A couple drops of Locktite, and a hammer to "set it" with an interference fit, then grind off the excess. If needed scrape it level, and you'll have a permanent repair.


        The biggest problem I had when starting out was; I can't fix that....WHY not? it's a piece of grey iron or steel. Don't dance around it, dive in!
        Last edited by saltmine; 06-10-2010, 04:28 PM.
        No good deed goes unpunished.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd steer clear of Bondo. Polyester fillers don't tend to adhere very well, in my experience. JB Weld seems to be a common technique as well as that mentioned by saltmine.

          Comment


          • #6
            Gopher it

            Similar thread on another forum this week.
            Several report good results with Liquid Steel and similar products.
            I'd sure do it. You certainly won't hurt anything.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by saltmine
              Why play around with plastic fillers?

              I'd drill it out with an end mill, ream it to a real close fit, and make a plug on my lathe out of mild steel bar stock round. A couple drops of Locktite, and a hammer to "set it" with an interference fit, then grind off the excess. If needed scrape it level, and you'll have a permanent repair.


              The biggest problem I had when starting out was; I can't fix that....WHY not? it's a piece of grey iron or steel. Don't dance around it, dive in!



              ^ Thats what I'd do.
              Andy

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Fasttrack
                I'd steer clear of Bondo. Polyester fillers don't tend to adhere very well, in my experience. JB Weld seems to be a common technique as well as that mentioned by saltmine.

                Gee, I mentioned using JB Weld and I don't even get so much as a wham, bam, thank you man. It's OK, I'm used to being ignored. Been married for a long time.........

                I had a couple of small end mill notches in my big Webb when I got it and I used JB Weld. You can't even see them after a year. That stuff is very, very hard.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Since nobody has mentioned it, I'd suggest a bit of J-B Weld.
                  Once it gets some oil on it, you won't even notice the repair.
                  Mike

                  My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MotorradMike
                    Since nobody has mentioned it, I'd suggest a bit of J-B Weld.
                    Once it gets some oil on it, you won't even notice the repair.
                    Right....."nobody" mentioned it. LOL.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why don't You try JB Weld, I can't believe it hasn't been brought up yet.

                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well, since no- one ELSE has mentioned JB Weld, why not a metal- bearing epoxy??!!

                        Seriously, I'd look for a 2- part epoxy that has good adhesion to metal, maybe
                        rough up the bottom (or undercut the sides) of the gouge,
                        and then fill it. Use an aluminum file to take the high spots down,
                        and you're good to go.

                        Me, I just avoid the few 'PO divots' in my cheap and cheerful Taiwanese mill,
                        and am a happy race car fabricator...

                        heh

                        t
                        rusting in Seattle

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How about something as simple and invisible as JB Weld? I'm a bit surprised nobody mentioned it yet.

                          P.S. If the holes don't interfere with your work, you really don't need to do anything at all.

                          P.P.S. Alternatively, you can try JB Weld. Usually, people forget mentioning it.
                          Mike
                          WI/IL border, USA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Since I used to be a welder, and repaired cracked engine blocks and cylinder heads...I figured an interference fit plug would be appropriate.
                            Welding on a mill table would introduce stress and warpage....

                            We used to repair cracked blocks between cylinders on Ford "Y" block engines by drilling a series of holes along the crack and pounding in "iron-tight" plugs, with a hammer. You grind them flush, and put the head back on...I've never seen one fail.
                            No good deed goes unpunished.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This maybe of interest . http://moglice.com/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X