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  • Peter.
    replied
    Originally posted by saltmine
    Welding on a mill table would introduce stress and warpage....
    Not if JB did it

    Leave a comment:


  • laddy
    replied
    Thanks to all for the help!! I would like to do the endmill steel repai but fear I will screw things up more than they already are. I think I will go with the JB weld and keep the steel repair for later. I appreciate the great help. Fred

    Leave a comment:


  • sidneyt
    replied
    Let's hear it for gnm109 and JB Weld. Hip, hip, hurray!

    I think JB Weld is a great solution.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by lynnl
    gnm109, do you sometimes feel like maybe you're a long-lost brother of Rodney Dangerfield?

    I know that feeling ...it's disheartening isn't it?

    Sure do. I get no respect! But If you want to really know what I'm like, rent a copy of "Natural Born Killers" and watch Rodney's performance.....LOL.

    Leave a comment:


  • lynnl
    replied
    gnm109, do you sometimes feel like maybe you're a long-lost brother of Rodney Dangerfield?

    I know that feeling ...it's disheartening isn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Boot
    replied
    Patch

    Originally posted by gnm109
    Right....."nobody" mentioned it. LOL.
    When I was working in a machine shop when we made a boo boo on a cast iron part we patched it with a compound made by Devcon. We called it by that name and we filled in many holes with it. It was same color and it was made for patching cast iron. That was 10yrs ago so I don't know what that company has out now. It sort of looked like JBweld compound a gray color.
    Boot

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack
    Sorry gnm109 - I did read your post but I was commenting on the earlier suggestion to use either bondo or two part epoxy. It just seems like this topic comes up a lot and the generally accepted solution is JB Weld. Didn't mean to steal your thunder
    I was just kidding you. LOL. I use J.B. Weld for lots of things nowadays. It sure beats welding cast iron.

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  • rolland
    replied
    JB weld sounds like a good idea

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Sorry gnm109 - I did read your post but I was commenting on the earlier suggestion to use either bondo or two part epoxy. It just seems like this topic comes up a lot and the generally accepted solution is JB Weld. Didn't mean to steal your thunder

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This maybe of interest . http://moglice.com/

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  • saltmine
    replied
    Since I used to be a welder, and repaired cracked engine blocks and cylinder heads...I figured an interference fit plug would be appropriate.
    Welding on a mill table would introduce stress and warpage....

    We used to repair cracked blocks between cylinders on Ford "Y" block engines by drilling a series of holes along the crack and pounding in "iron-tight" plugs, with a hammer. You grind them flush, and put the head back on...I've never seen one fail.

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  • MichaelP
    replied
    How about something as simple and invisible as JB Weld? I'm a bit surprised nobody mentioned it yet.

    P.S. If the holes don't interfere with your work, you really don't need to do anything at all.

    P.P.S. Alternatively, you can try JB Weld. Usually, people forget mentioning it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tobias-B
    replied
    Well, since no- one ELSE has mentioned JB Weld, why not a metal- bearing epoxy??!!

    Seriously, I'd look for a 2- part epoxy that has good adhesion to metal, maybe
    rough up the bottom (or undercut the sides) of the gouge,
    and then fill it. Use an aluminum file to take the high spots down,
    and you're good to go.

    Me, I just avoid the few 'PO divots' in my cheap and cheerful Taiwanese mill,
    and am a happy race car fabricator...

    heh

    t

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  • doctor demo
    replied
    Why don't You try JB Weld, I can't believe it hasn't been brought up yet.

    Steve

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by MotorradMike
    Since nobody has mentioned it, I'd suggest a bit of J-B Weld.
    Once it gets some oil on it, you won't even notice the repair.
    Right....."nobody" mentioned it. LOL.

    Leave a comment:

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