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Getting started in home powder coating

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  • Getting started in home powder coating

    Well for years I have been wanting to try and I am finally getting set up. I have a low tech paint booth (see pic below) and a donated kitchen oven to get me going. What are some of you using for hangers and how are you haning them in the ovens? Pics would be cool...

    http://picasaweb.google.com/11443235...90476500016306
    Bob
    Pics of shop and some projects
    http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y39...achine%20Shop/

  • #2
    Quite similar to one I built from plywood. The only major difference is that I put a sloped V bottom in the booth to collect and reuse the powder. You may want to consider using a mask while coating.

    For hangers I simply used custom hooks made from coast hangers or O/A welding rod.

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    • #3
      Thanks Dr...I have a mask and plan on hanging a plastic bag below the parts in the booth. I am looking at a little more techy kinda of booth for the future.
      Bob
      Pics of shop and some projects
      http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y39...achine%20Shop/

      Comment


      • #4
        Do you need a specific manufacturers cardboard box or will any type do??

        Regards Ian
        You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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        • #5
          What are you doing still up???? I think the high tech one will need to be a specfic brand. I suppose a proper google search is in order.)
          Bob
          Pics of shop and some projects
          http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y39...achine%20Shop/

          Comment


          • #6
            This may not be directly applicable to your particular oven setup but I use trolleys in my 2'X3'X6' home-built powder coat oven. There is an upper trolley and a lower trolley. They have a number of 3/8-16 nuts welded in to hold bolts and redi-rod studs upon which to either hang or support items. I spray the items with powder outside and then, when the oven is heated, I open the door and roll the trolleys in. It works for me.

            Perhaps you could install some rails in either the top or bottom of your oven and roll the items in after coating them?

            Lower trolley:



            Upper trolley.

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            • #7
              gmn, thanks for taking the time to post your pictures. I take it you are using this for parts that have an uncoated surface and no doubt I will have some of those to do. How do you handle situations that require all the surfaces to be painted?
              Bob
              Pics of shop and some projects
              http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y39...achine%20Shop/

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by deere_x475guy
                gmn, thanks for taking the time to post your pictures. I take it you are using this for parts that have an uncoated surface and no doubt I will have some of those to do. How do you handle situations that require all the surfaces to be painted?

                Hello.

                As you mention I only use this for items that have been stripped to bare metal, either by machining, chemicals or with bead blasting. I then coat them completely with powder except for holes that are plugged with hi-temp plugs or surfaces that need to be kept clear with hi-temp tape. Sometimes, I will use a scrap bolt to plug a larger threaded hole to keep the powder out.

                I built the oven larger so I that I could do an occasional motorcycle frame but have only used it for smaller parts so far. I probably could have done with a kitchen oven initially, but I may need the capacity later on.

                I'm not quite clear on your reference to "all the surfaces to be painted". I do nothing further once the parts are powdercoated so there is no painting done. If something were to be painted, I would just prime and paint. Please clarify the painting reference. Thanks.

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                • #9
                  A cardboard box is just fine when powder coating, if everything is setup correctly you'll have a lot less "over-spray" than you may be used to with painting. The biggest eye opener for me was just how LITTLE air pressure is needed. For small jobs you just want the powder almost "wafting" out, bigger jobs you can crank it up a bit more. If using a cardboard box remember the part needs to be earthed to the same earth as your gun system. In the picture shown I can see a part suspended by a steel wire, hanging from a steel rod, but can't see that rod earthed in any way. Remember that the gun charges the powder which will be attracted to an earth (hopefully your part). If the part isn't earthed for some reason then it won't attract the powder. My oven is miniscule so I'm often coating with the parts on racks. After each session I run the racks over the linisher with a scotchbrite belt to remove the excess baked on powder. If I don't, the powder on the racks insulates the parts from ground. Finally, yes you could apply the powder outside but it would want to be absolutely dead calm with no breeze at all. The powder is like talc and very easily blown around, if I'm doing small parts with the pressure turned right down even a slight breeze will affect the powder application, too much pressure simply wastes powder and on some jobs you don't want reused powder (it picks up dust and contaminants no matter how carefully you gather it).

                  I'm real interested in more details in more pictures and details of shop made ovens as I'm desperately in need of a larger oven.

                  Pete

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                  • #10
                    not a topic i know much about - the powder coating is applied electrostatically ? how long a bake and at what temp?

                    is this pretty much the same as the process used in industry?

                    one more Q, how thick does the coating end up being

                    thanks
                    .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mcgyver
                      not a topic i know much about - the powder coating is applied electrostatically ? how long a bake and at what temp?

                      is this pretty much the same as the process used in industry?

                      one more Q, how thick does the coating end up being

                      thanks
                      Yes it is an electrostatic process. The powder is charged in the gun and the negative lead is attached to the item to be coated. You usually bake it at 350 for about an hour, just like a cake. BTW, one needs to use an electric oven, not a gas one. Seems there are some flammability issues with a gas oven.

                      It is essentially the same as the industrial process, just on a smaller scale. I don't remember the thickness of the coating.

                      It's a relatively inexpensive process to set up and also very easy to use. I'm going to use our old electric oven and buy a HF powder coater as all the home versions are Chinese, even the ones from the auto refinishing catalogs. I set one up at my former school and used a welding rod oven. Worked great.

                      Be aware the powder is very messy. Make sure you do not track it into Mama's house.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yep electrostatic, that's why the part needs to be earthed. I'm not sure if it's exactly the same used in really big plants, but if you mean places where you may send parts out to be powder coated then yes, just the scale is different. I bake at 200C for about 15 minutes after flow out.

                        Thickness, cripes now you've got me! I know how thick the conventional paints I spray will go, but not powder coating, sorry. With conventional spraying you typically would spray a primer then a number of finish coats. Indeed the spraying I do is even more than that as it would typically involve spray fillers too. Powder coating is a one step process, so the final film is typically thinner than conventional, say enamel, finish. However it is EXTREMELY tough. It's a lot more difficult to "build up" like conventional paints can be. Basically once the part is fully loaded with powder, that's it, you can get more on, but not infinitely like a spray gun. Powder coating is just fantastic in my opinion, no more heavy areas, runs or curtains, not to mention isos and stinking solvents to worry about. Once the parts come out of the oven they cool then they're good to go.

                        Getting into it doesn't need to be expensive at all. Check out the systems as sold by Eastwood http://www.eastwood.com/ I use one of their systems through a 230-115v transformer here in Oz.

                        A couple of caveats, PC CANNOT be applied over any conventional finish, the paint will boil/peel/nuke itself during baking and screw up the PC finish. Also the powder fumes are slightly toxic while curing and they say will contaminate an oven, so no slipping it into the kitchen oven while wifey is out

                        Edit: oh I see we posted at the same time. Good thing we said the same things Oh one exception I don't find it messy at all, much less so than spraying that's for sure. I think people run too much air through their PC guns in which case yes it will blow this fine powder EVERYWHERE. But if you're careful you can apply it at low pressure and there's virtually no mess at all. Sometimes I will just throw a rack on my welding bench (steel) and PC it right there, the steel bench attracts all the over-spray! The best thing is the clean-up. Powder can be reused, but picks up crap with it, so maybe not for "show" jobs, so any excess gets put in a container. Meanwhile the gun etc just gets blown out with air (outside), sure beats 15 minutes of stripping and cleaning a spray gun!
                        Last edited by PeteF; 06-14-2010, 12:54 AM.

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                        • #13
                          PeterF,

                          Either I'm up too late, or your up early. It's 10:50 Central time here.

                          BTW, one of my most memorable port calls while in the USN was at Perth.

                          Loved Swan larger.

                          Stan

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                          • #14
                            Hey Stan, you're up late as it's 14:00 here

                            Perth is a beautiful city, it's become like my second home as I'm always there for work. Sadly the mining boom has made it quite expensive.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PeteF
                              Hey Stan, you're up late as it's 14:00 here

                              Perth is a beautiful city, it's become like my second home as I'm always there for work. Sadly the mining boom has made it quite expensive.
                              Wasn't very expensive when I was there, but being on the USS Coral Sea CVA-43 and visiting during a celebration of the victory of the Battle of the Coral Sea seemed to have something to do with that.

                              We'd been on Yankee Station for 45 days and participated in the rescue of the Mayaguez. So we had a fair amount of pay in our pockets especially since we didn't have to pay income tax plus we received combat pay.

                              Still fondly remember a little bar named Miniski's (sp?) in between Perth & Freemantle near a woman's college.

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