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Has anyone worked with CADLOY armor ?

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  • Has anyone worked with CADLOY armor ?

    Hi All,

    I have a job coming up that may require some drilling in CADLOY armor plating. I have searched on-line and only found one mention of drilling this stuff and the suggestions were not promising . What I am doing is refitting the emergency lighting and communications systems in our county sheriffs 'Peacekeeper' swat vehicle. This may require me to drill a few holes for mounting equipment and routing wiring. I had been told that the outer shell of this thing was un-drillable in any normal way. I did try to drill it just to find out how it would react. The cobalt drill I tried is now slagg and the surface of the armor is barely scratched. It was a 1/4 inch drill bit trying to punch 1/4 inch armor plate. I went real slow with cutting oil and all that happened was that the bit overheated and turned to slagg.
    It had been suggested to anneal the plating first, but this is not an option as the vehicle is freshly painted and detailed for the sheriff, so no burning the fresh paint . Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    Robin
    Robin

    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

  • #2
    No direct experience with cadloy, but You might try a good quality diamond core bit on a sample piece.

    Steve

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    • #3
      Howabout a .243 armor piercing round

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      • #4
        Would the armour be compromised by drilling holes in it?

        I would think the manufacturer and also the insurer will not be happy unless they approved the modification.

        So I would use glue.
        "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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        • #5
          I would expect it is just a version of high manganese steel, also known as a abrasion resistant plate or Hadfield steel. In the hard condition it is incredibly tough and nearly impossible to drill as it work hardens instantly the moment the material is disturbed in any way. The more it is disturbed the harder it becomes but it never becomes brittle. If you must cut it in the hard condition you must use a bit that does an absolute minimum of rubbing and has the sharpest possible edge. A brand new high quality carbide drill bit will work as I know from personal experience but may only last a few holes. Once the edge chips it is finished. Drilling holes will not compromise the armor unless somebody manages to shoot a round through the hole.

          edit: You need a powerful drill motor and a chuck that will not slip on the bit. Use very heavy pressure and some cutting oil at low rpm.
          Last edited by Evan; 06-14-2010, 08:52 AM.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            I've never heard of CADLOY, but it's probably Milspec 12560 (Rolled Homogeneous Armor). There are class ratings (1 through 3, maybe higher?) with corresponding penetration specs.

            http://www.aasteel.com/military.html

            I'm told that it machines like Hasteloy, but a common substitution is 4340 HT. Think you'd have to EDM the holes/threads for something that hard.
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              I drilled a bunch of holes in AR plate with a common masonary drill and coolant.You'll have to sharpen up the edges on a SC or Diamond wheel first,use lots of pressure and a low speed.

              It would be better if you had acess to a mag drill also,it's gonna be hard to get enough pressure with a hand drill.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                Darin, did you drill the armor plate after it was hardened?? Wow!
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  If it's anything thing like drilling holes in a Hummer, Evan and Darin are definitely right.

                  Here's some tips for drilling holes into the Hummer's armor plate.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Willy
                    If it's anything thing like drilling holes in a Hummer, Evan and Darin are definitely right.

                    Here's some tips for drilling holes into the Hummer's armor plate.
                    Neat page, but they're using HSS drills and drilling/tapped before heat treat:

                    "After drilling, the plates are formed and shaped for installation. Anniston Depot had been using cobalt-high-speed-steel (HSS) drills while performing the drilling on a number of different machine tools."
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      Robert, I gotta run run right now but will get back later with some evidence, but I remember reading an article, in I think Modern Machine Shop, a while back about armored vehicle manufacturing processes, and the plates were drilled and tapped in the hardened state as received from the mill prior to being formed.

                      Maybe I'm wrong, you know what they say about the mind being the first to go...well maybe not the first.

                      The link I gave though also gave me the impression that the plate was hardened already. I would think on large sections quality control of the end product would be more easy to maintain by procuring sheets from the mill in the hardened state rather than doing this in house.
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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                      • #12
                        It would be better if you had acess to a mag drill also,it's gonna be hard to get enough pressure with a hand drill.
                        If it is manganese steel it is non magnetic.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          If it is manganese steel it is non magnetic.
                          RHA is definitely magnetic. When I worked for Army Research Labs, we installed sensors on the M1 and Bradley armor with magnetic clamps.
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #14
                            Hi All and thanks for the quick replies. Just a little more information...
                            Cadloy is a trade-name for the armor alloy used by the manufacturer of the vehicle which is Textron Marine. There is very little info on this alloy on-line. I only have to drill a few holes to mount the radio equipment so I think that I will try to sharpen a masonry bit and cross my fingers. The metal is magnetic if that helps. It is also supposed to be able to stop up to 7.62 mm AP rounds so I don't think I want to be that close to it if I tried to poke a hole that way . The ricochet and shrapnel might ruin my day. I understand that it is fairly easy to weld to the armor plating but they have already sent the rig to the paint shop so welding is out for now. I will keep you posted on my progress next week. Thanks to all for the replies.

                            Robin
                            Robin

                            Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ckelloug
                              Howabout a .243 armor piercing round
                              Hmm he mentions 0.250 holes required though, thats a little undersize.

                              Can you buy a 0.250 +-0.001 reamer round?
                              Or are you just hopeing for the 0.243 round to bore oversized? :P
                              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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