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Motorcycle chain lube questions

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  • Motorcycle chain lube questions

    Just got back into the hobby and I am out of date.
    1) There used to be a chain lube that was sold in a metal tin, you would heat the tin up, the lube would turn to liquid. Lower the chain in and wait till it cooled. It was the best at the time and I think it was a British product. Does this still exist and is it available in the US? I thought it was called Linklyfe??
    ) Best other spray on alternatives? Many Thanks

  • #2
    That tin stuff was called link life or something. Don't know if it's still available.

    I use Rock Oil chain Lube applied after riding. I steer-clear of the anti-fling chain waxes, I think they are too gummy, don't lube enough and hold dirt too easily.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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    • #3
      Castrol GRIPPA 60S

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      • #4
        get a scott oiler...
        its a gravity fed oiling device with a vacuum operated dispensing valve.
        http://www.scottoiler.com/

        no connection with me except I've bought at least 4 ...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by derekm
          get a scott oiler...
          its a gravity fed oiling device with a vacuum operated dispensing valve.
          http://www.scottoiler.com/

          no connection with me except I've bought at least 4 ...
          Or go for the cheap manual alternative. A hand soap pump dispenser and a length of tube.

          A steady flow of oil to the chain will give better life than anything short of a FERC (fully enclosed rear chain) ,beloved of Aerials and MZeds.
          Paul Compton
          www.morini-mania.co.uk
          http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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          • #6
            If you've bought a new chain it might be an O-ring one. Each pin has O-rings on both ends to keep lube in. Applying oil or grease to these just makes dirt stick.
            I put WD-40 on my dirt bike O-ring chain on the advice of someone who has laboured through the endless debates on the subject.
            Mike

            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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            • #7
              Is this an O-ring chain or a non O-ring chain?

              There are lots of chains lubes out there. If you are running an O-ring chain, the product should say on the container if it is compatible for use on such a chain. Using the wrong lubricant can cause the rings to swell to the point of first a severe binding, then failure of the O-ring.

              There are lubes that can be used on both. That's what I look for, then there isn't any confusion as to what I grab.
              Last edited by topct; 06-14-2010, 06:02 PM.
              Gene

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              • #8
                I use the spray on anti fling stuff (Bel-ray) never had a problem and I put about 7-8000 miles a year on my bike. Sprockets and chains have always held up fine. I hate the scott oiler types as they fling oil all over the place. I clean and lube the chain thoroughly about every 2500-3000 miles and spray the chain about every 1000-1500 miles regardless.

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                • #9
                  Non-o ring chain. 54 pan. I was hoping Linklyfe might be available, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

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                  • #10
                    I used to use a product called racing chain lube, I think it was from Bel Rey. That was pretty good. Now I have something called champions choice chain life. That seems to be good also. I use it on my bicycle chain as well.

                    I think there needs to be a distinction- is this for a street bike or dirt bike- it would not surprise me if there's an optimuum product for each category. For the dirt bike you would want to shed dirt as much as provide lube. For a street bike you would likely want the lube to shed dirt also, but it should stay in place and provide lube for a longer period of time. Maybe there's a top quality lube that does both- supposedly that's what the Bel Ray racing chain lube was.

                    O-ring chains- I can understand the reluctance to lube them because of the possible damage to the 0-rings, but- what kind of lube do the rings keep in? Chain lube? I think you'd want to apply an external lube anyway for the sake of the sprockets and the links. What's the point of lubing the inside of the links if you're not going to lube the outside- seems odd to me.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      I have had a number of chain drive bikes and the chain was always problem. When the right amount of lub was applied it would throw it off.
                      A few years ago I found the perfect solution. I started buying shaft drive bikes. Works Great!

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                      • #12
                        I used to use a product called Chain Wax. It's very good. I used to use it, that is, until my former Harley Shovelhead developed an excellent transmission leak that was exactly the amount required to keep the chain nice and wet. There's no sense spendng money when you don't need to.

                        .

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jack772
                          I have had a number of chain drive bikes and the chain was always problem. When the right amount of lub was applied it would throw it off.
                          A few years ago I found the perfect solution. I started buying shaft drive bikes. Works Great!

                          You still need to remove your drive shaft on your shaft-driven bike now and then to lube the drive splines. I knew several Gold Wing owners who didn't do the necessary maintenance and the shafts wore loose in time. When I had my Gold Wing a few years ago, I would remove the drive unit and shaft whenever I installed a new rear tire. Honda makes a special Moly Lube for that job.

                          I do like a shaft-drive bike but the belt drive on my Harley-Davidson is also rather low maintenance as long as you avoid gravel roads. LOL.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by daryl bane
                            Non-o ring chain. 54 pan. I was hoping Linklyfe might be available, but that doesn't seem to be the case.
                            Now that sounds like pics reqd.............
                            Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

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                            • #15
                              For Hardtail, here ya go. Just doing alittle cleanup.

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