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  • BWS
    replied
    George,check your PM's.

    Oh,and I shot a '72 Bear TD with "our" custom CF limbs,60# @ 29 for 10 years professionally.BW

    Leave a comment:


  • gmatov
    replied
    Some of you are getting the idea.

    30 years ago I told my partner on my electric buggy, machine repair, age 63, that he was working for nothing. We argued about that for a while. I crashed a car, broke some ribs, was off 7 weeks, went back to work, thought we would be a team again.

    No, he went to HR while I was off, they told him he would make more, after taxes and all other deductions, retired than he did while working. He was gone. Poor guy used to love fishing at Pymatuning Lake, near Lake Erie, and rolled his boat over and drowned about7 years later. 3 days before they found his body.

    He was a good partner, and knew his stuff.

    'Nother in the steel mill electronics dept., 64, 44 years service, NO OT in that dept., said he couldn't afford to retire. I gave him my estimate, he went to HR, they told him he was losing money working, HE was gone the next week.

    I don't like WalMart, but a lot of people COULD retire and be ahead of the game with their pension and SS and 8 bucks an hour as a WalMart greeter. They might be TEN bucks an hour ahead, part time. Don't ask me to back that up.

    danlb,

    I am kinda lazy. I don't do lots of tough stuff, unless my kids make demands of me. I didn't do any hard work before my shoulder went out. I THINK, I simply slept on it wrong, popped it out, and SHOULD have gone to the Doc next day. Didn't. Three months later, did, BFD, they don't see anything wrong.

    I don't think it is weakening of the muscles. I've worked for near 50 years. Right arm to boot, and that is my strong arm. But I get a click and I get a lock up when I move it in certain ways. Bad joint, I think.

    Cheers,

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • saltmine
    replied
    Putting seniors in prison sounds like a pretty good idea. And criminals in nursing homes would be "cruel & unusual punishment" (they deserve it, though)

    The other way would be to take citizenship from all seniors. That way, they would be illegal aliens, and could get free food, clothing, housing, education, and medical care, and not have to pay a dime for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • saltmine
    replied
    Funny, now that you mentioned that, Gaston. When I retired, I decided I'd keep on working. And, after a number of low paying jobs, I discovered it was costing me almost as much as I was making, to be working.

    Last year, I decided to quit trying, and when tax time rolled around, I didn't owe the government hardly anything. (the year before, I owed the IRS over $1000).

    Strange, I'm not working at all now, and I seem to get by just fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • gaston
    replied
    Quit "work " at 50 for mental health reasons (customers were driving me nuts) wife worked for 5 more years. its been 16 years and I haven't missed working at all. Its surprising how much money it costs to go to work. we hardly missed my pay.
    "retirement is doing what you want when you want to do it"
    if you want to work and you enjoy it then you are retired

    Leave a comment:


  • Hamilton
    replied
    Retire before 45. I am in the construction trades. Economy effected to say the least. I am layed off. I catch a day of work here and there Keep up with ever changing unemployment rules, worry about health insurance cost and eligibility. Work a little in my shop. I only spend money in the shop that is generated from the shop. Buy sell trade this and that. Attack the never ending honey do list. Looks like i have the same criteria for retirement. The only catch is when the job market picks up and i go back to work steady...I will have to work until the day i die.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Without prejudice

    This came in the email today - I've seen variants of it over a while.

    Without prejudice - or comment:

    A Concept to consider - 15/06/10

    Let's put the seniors in jail, and the criminals in a nursing home.

    This way the seniors would have access to showers, hobbies, and walks. They'd receive unlimited free prescriptions, dental and medical treatment, wheelchairs , hearing aids, etc., and receive some money instead of paying it out. They would be protected from the criminal element and scam artists who prey upon the seniors.

    They would have constant video monitoring, so they could be helped instantly if they fell or needed assistance. Bedding would be washed twice a week, and all clothing would be ironed and returned to them.

    A guard would check on them every 20 minutes, and bring their meals and snacks to their cell. They would have family visits in a suite built for that purpose. They would have access to a library, weight room, counseling, pool, and free education.

    Simple clothing, shoes, slippers, P.J.'s and legal aid would be free, on request. Private, secure rooms for all, with an exercise outdoor yard, with gardens.

    Each senior could have a P.C., a T.V., radio, and daily phone calls.

    There would be a board of directors to hear complaints, and the guards would have a code of conduct, that would be strictly adhered to.

    The "criminals" would get cold food, be left all alone, and unsupervised.Lights off at 8pm, and showers once a week.They would live in a tiny room, and pay $5000.00 per month and have no hope of ever getting out.

    Justice for all.

    Leave a comment:


  • gmatov
    replied
    Money's funny. You make XX dollars and you simply don't have enough.

    Now, this will hit a raw nerve here, or maybe over there, but in my latter, with more seniority, years, and I WAS Union shop, I took VLO, Voluntary Lay Off, rather than let a younger man be laid off. They might not be called back. I would.

    My UC was approx. the same as my while working takehome, if you ignore the money that was going to the CU and the money that would have gone to the 401, which I would have seen even greater losses over the last couple years than I did see.

    I was probably ahead of the game. I drove 20 miles to work, say 3 gallons at 3 bucks per day, so 9 X 5 is 45, per week. That I did not contribute to either the CU or the 401 didn't and doesn't bother me one bit. Over 5 years and I haven't touched the 401, so I think I can do without it. Will probably be part of my estate.

    My income is enough for me to live on, and to help my kids, and still build up more than I need. I don't want to die with the biggest bequest to my kids. I would rather help them while I am alive and they need help.

    Cheers,

    George

    I'll tell you about a couple guys who said they couldn't afford to retire in a future post.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1937 Chief
    replied
    I guess I can I am offically retired from the Unisys computor co. after 36 years. I do have a business cutting fire brakes here in S. Calif., but the good thing, it is only around four months, and as of now it is 2/3 over. I can start, or stop any time I want, or take a day off. without anyone asking any questions. Life it great. Stan

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by gmatov
    Exercise is not, I think, what I need, for this shoulder. Unless you think that "no pain, no gain" is still the goal of exercise. I can get lots of pain with little effort just lifting to horizontal. I should be gaining lots.
    IIRC, The concept behind the exercise is to strengthen the muscles that hold the shoulder together while also stretching tendons that may be restricting movement.

    Surgery CAN be of benefit in many cases, as can various injections.


    Back on topic...

    When I was an independent consultant during the dot-com boom I would routinely have many months between jobs. During that 7 years I was able to enjoy being semi-retired. I delved into many area that had piqued my interest, including machining, locksmithing, exotic flashlight collecting and building. Now that I'm back to work the only new skills I've picked up lately is MIG and OA welding.

    I really look forward to being able to retire again.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    It's wise to retire while you can still move without too much pain. I had a terrible orthopedic problem with my left hip and it took a long time to fix. While I was recuperating, I looked around and checked my finances and determined that I was not going to work anymore.

    Now that I'm not workng, I notice that I still have all of my possessions and the sun comes up in the morning as before. I have the good, quiet time in the early mornings to do the things I like to do, only one of which is HSM. While I'm not rich by any means, I have finances enough to get by and just enough of everything I need.

    Part of being able to retire is the ability to look at one's situation and determine what is really important and what is really necessary. You may already have all of the elements necessary to be able to retire. Try it, you'll like it.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • gmatov
    replied
    BWS,
    In my prime, a 45# recurve was about all I could draw. THAT one, if you can believe, that GD and a Gson managed to break one of the limbs off in my basement, playing, not with IT, I don't think, but just playing. They were maybe 6 and 3.

    This shoulder has been screwed up for about 16 months. I thought it was bursitis. Had that once before. Later decided to go to the Doc. I don't go there often. He says "Gotta get an Xray before you are allowed to get an MRI. Tech who shot it said, "Yep, that's a dislocation." Doc says "No, the guy who reads them says it's not dislocated." I asked why in the hell does it still hurt after near a year and he says he doesn't know.

    Exercise is not, I think, what I need, for this shoulder. Unless you think that "no pain, no gain" is still the goal of exercise. I can get lots of pain with little effort just lifting to horizontal. I should be gaining lots.

    Love being retired. Hope some more of you can get here before you die. I, for one, never thought I wanted to die in harness.

    Never saw a headstone that was inscribed "I wish I had spent more time at work."

    Cheers,

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • BWS
    replied
    George,about ripped my left arm off my body 1 1/2 years ago in a MC wreck(head to toe race leathers saved big time).No docs,but in talking with several athletes who'd been through same....and a little research found that any surgery was mainly for cosmetic reasons.Maybe if I was 18 but no way in mid 50's...it's too intrusive of a surgery.

    Bought a Smith machine and worked through it........shoulder's good enough that I can still shoot traditional archery equip(50# recurves).Best of luck,BW.

    PS,I tried retirement....lasted about 5 minutes.Nothing really changed?Still in the shop everyday.

    Leave a comment:


  • gmatov
    replied
    JR,

    Enjoy that little girl. My only granddaughter has graduated, is moving a couple hundred miles to live with her Dad to go to school. She's been my Soccer Buddy for more than 12 years. Took her to ALL her practices, left work early every Saturday to take her to games, and watched her play in every game in High School.

    No more of that, and I am at a loss. I have 2 grandsons coming up, 7 and 5, and have possibly 12 years of encouraging them, but past 65, I don't know if I will be there.

    If you want something for the baby girl to do in the shop, try a jig saw. Reciprocating bench top. The beauty of them is that they are less prone to cutting fingers off. Band saw will cut your hand off, pushing too hard. Jig saws reciprocate, you get bit, the blade rises and you can pull your thumb back without losing it.

    I've been a shooter all my life. Bought the boys Remington Bird Hunter for the Wii yesterday. They and Mom and Dad love it. The boys want me to teach them to shoot, Mom wants me to teach them to shoot, even take them to trap shoots, which I did for a good few years.

    I think I have found where to will all my guns. My Grands. My kid is less PC, I guess, than most mothers. I took them to a store some time back and tried to buy them cap pistols, the 7 YO said "Mom would never let us have GUNS." I told Mom that and she said "I LOVED capguns when I was a kid."

    Trouble is that they are all crap, today. They don't shoot, they don't feed.

    I don't KNOW if I can buy an air rifle that is child sized. I know I can buy a .22 that is. I think Mom is OK with that. Dad, I don't know. He was pretty well sheltered in his upbringing.

    I'll see. Personally, I am no longer into cased cartridge shooting, today. I'm more into BP revolvers. I think I could let the boys shoot a .36 with minimal loads.

    Cheers,

    George

    Ps, Ain't a one of them gonna hold up my 4 pound 9 ounce Walker. Dislocated shoulder a year ago, and not treated, Doc said Xray says No, I have trouble holding it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by dockrat
    They might move out of the house but they still live in your wallet LOL
    Hahaha.. Other than school they are on their own after they move out. We have a school account set up for each of them. And we started when they were young. Well, they are young. But younger, when they were born. And its a drain on the income.

    I was against it, I never went to college. But my wife was in college for 9 years and is all for college. I was thinking the military is good enough. So anyway, she won that battle. But there is a compromise. If the kids dont go to college then that money will be our vacation travel fund. The kids dont get it unless they go to school. No sitting around on their azz living off the money while trying to figure out what they want to do in life. Life just hit you at 18. Live it or die trying. Im hoping they live it and go to school. JR

    Leave a comment:

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