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need help identifing a small shaper

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  • need help identifing a small shaper

    The nameplate on the machine has been painted over and damaged on a small shaper (7" aprox), causing the logo on the plate to have faded. What can be seen is a picture of a square tooth gear viewed on the face (2D, not 3D). What is the name of the maker? The machine is north-american and doesn't seem to have a native motor mount (so it was probably driven by water).

    Edit: my photos start on page 4: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...t=41996&page=4
    Last edited by Elninio; 09-25-2010, 12:38 PM.

  • #2
    A photo would help a million.

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by rockrat
      A photo would help a million.

      rock~
      Honestly, it wouldn't --- I'd be surprised if the camera could even pick it up in a way that the human eye can tell the colors apart. Its just the outline of a gear with square tooth, like in the logo for Lico Machinery (http://www.lipoco.com/images/LICOTM.GIF). Aside from that, all I remember from the previous owner is that the company was a very popular one, possibly made in Ontario (Canada).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Elninio
        Honestly, it wouldn't --- I'd be surprised if the camera could even pick it up in a way that the human eye can tell the colors apart.
        I think rockrat wanted a picture of the whole shaper and not just the nameplate. The folks around here can usually ID machines from an overall view of the machine.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by b2u44
          I think rockrat wanted a picture of the whole shaper and not just the nameplate. The folks around here can usually ID machines from an overall view of the machine.
          Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Elninio
            Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).
            So in other words, you don't really want help figuring out which shaper you have?

            Comment


            • #7
              Until I have photos, I will try to describe some features of the shaper:
              - I'm not sure if its a 7" or 8" model
              - it has box ways, except on the Z axis of the knife holder
              - the table Z axis coupling (between the feed screw[horizontal], and the screw that holds the table in place[vertical, it is fixed to the base and doesn't rotate, but rather the gear rotates around it]) is by helical gears,
              -there is a speed lever at the back that shifts a clutch inside the machine to one of three positions; the middle position disengages the clutch,
              -there is no chain drive on this machine; all mechanisms inside are gears
              -the machine was originally painted black (possibly the primer), then beige, then green, then machine tool gray; the black and beige layers seemed to behave like bondo when grinding it off with a wire brush, and the beige layer being approximately 1mm in thickness
              -the stand is all rounded and non-polygonal like that of ammco shapers; the top view of the plate that the shaper sits on looks like a semi-circle attached to a rectangle,

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              • #8
                How hard is it to take a picture and post it? Takes two minutes, one if you have a cell phone that takes pictures. Or go to lathes.co.uk and look there for examples.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Waterlogged
                  How hard is it to take a picture and post it? Takes two minutes, one if you have a cell phone that takes pictures. Or go to lathes.co.uk and look there for examples.
                  It would take a whole day actually since everything is in boxes, it would take me a couple of hours if I just opened all the boxes and left them open with items spilling all over the place. I can't upload photos from my phone for various other reasons.

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                  • #10
                    Elninio what does hahahahahahaha mean?
                    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Elninio
                      -there is a speed lever at the back that shifts a clutch inside the machine to one of three positions; the middle position disengages the clutch,
                      Except for this part of the quote, it sounds like every other shaper I have ever seen.

                      Does it look like a Jones? http://www.lathes.co.uk/jones/page2.html

                      rock~
                      Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        HAHAHAHAHAHA means something is REALLY funny.

                        hahahahahahaha means something is really funny but not nearly as funny as HAHAHAHAHAHA.

                        I think.
                        Mike

                        My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Elninio
                          Until I have photos, I will try to describe some features of the shaper:
                          - I'm not sure if its a 7" or 8" model
                          - it has box ways, except on the Z axis of the knife holder
                          - the table Z axis coupling (between the feed screw[horizontal], and the screw that holds the table in place[vertical, it is fixed to the base and doesn't rotate, but rather the gear rotates around it]) is by helical gears,
                          -there is a speed lever at the back that shifts a clutch inside the machine to one of three positions; the middle position disengages the clutch,
                          -there is no chain drive on this machine; all mechanisms inside are gears
                          -the machine was originally painted black (possibly the primer), then beige, then green, then machine tool gray; the black and beige layers seemed to behave like bondo when grinding it off with a wire brush, and the beige layer being approximately 1mm in thickness
                          -the stand is all rounded and non-polygonal like that of ammco shapers; the top view of the plate that the shaper sits on looks like a semi-circle attached to a rectangle,
                          Some similar elements, some not on this Swiss Torpex (which I think is a copy of a early Elliott or Alba design). But that's a bit like saying cars from different manufacturers have similar elements, like four wheels and an engine. A photo would be really helpful.

                          Last edited by Bob Farr; 06-18-2010, 08:55 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Elninio
                            Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).


                            Ok. I'd like to play this game. I'm trying to figure out what collets my mill takes. I've already got one but I'd like to buy more. What I can tell you is that its big on one end and gets smaller on the other. Oh, and its got a bar that you screw into the top. Anyone have any clue what taper it is?

                            Rodger

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rockrat
                              Except for this part of the quote, it sounds like every other shaper I have ever seen.

                              Does it look like a Jones? http://www.lathes.co.uk/jones/page2.html

                              rock~
                              Its definitely not a Jones; the table construction is a box mounted on two box ways which are connected by two helical gears to the Z screw.

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