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  • Drill bit assembly

    I bought a set of Sears Craftsman Cobalt drill bits today that according to the package were proudly assembled in the USA! It just makes me feel good to know that I have helped all those skilled US workers keep their jobs assembling drill bits here in the USA.

  • #2
    That reads a bit sarcastic. Are you thinking that maybe 'Usa' is a Chinese town or that maybe the 'assembly' consisted of putting the drill index into a cardboard box?
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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    • #3
      What else could it mean? There isn't much else to do with a drill but put it into an index.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MotorradMike
        That reads a bit sarcastic.


        Definitely meant to be sarcastic as I would think it was just a lame attempt to make people think they are buying USA made drill bits instead of Chinese, I mean after all how the dickens would somebody "assemble" a stinkin drill bit? As far as placing them in an index these things were just in a plastic package in a blister pack so "assembly" could not mean anything except packaging, why couldn't they just say "packaged" in the USA? When did packaging an imported product become assembly?

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        • #5
          Two possibilities:

          One: it is, in fact, an intentional misleading, with the assumption that "putting the bits in their packaging" constitutes "assembly", and therefore by the letter of the law they can state so.

          Or Two: They have the graphics 'template' for the packaging, since the same general bubblepack is used for a variety of parts, bits and tools. Some items are indeed assembled, others are single parts like drill and screwdriver bits. So 'assembled' fits more products than 'made', considering even the assembled stuff typically uses some overseas components.

          Or, a third possibility; I see a lot of things like that as entirely separate stickers, presumably because the same packaging is used for other countries that don't have the same legal requirements for labelling, or because sometimes parts of the assembly come from more than one place.

          In this case, it's possible somebody just slapped on the wrong sticker, or they're just using one sticker for everything.

          Doc.
          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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          • #6
            I'm afraid your right.

            They can print "assemble" on the stinken package and hope enough gullible people believe that they are actually supporting American industry, when in fact the drill bits were only assembled, or brought together in the US.

            Just like most salesmen...tell the public what they want to hear, just make sure it's not an outright lie and you'll get away with it.
            Deceit is a lot harder to enforce.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #7
              I saw a Rubbermaid storage container set at Walmart yesterday that said "Made in USA from foreign components." They're plastic Rubbermaid containers, not some complex assembly with multiple moving parts. Did the raw material come from someplace else or are they saying it's made here because they put all the bottoms and tops together here? BTW, this was in a big red, white, and blue display with "American Summer" emblazoned everywhere. This was the only thing I saw with Made in the USA on it. Everything else was Hecho en China.
              Stuart de Haro

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hornluv
                I saw a Rubbermaid storage container set at Walmart yesterday that said "Made in USA from foreign components." They're plastic Rubbermaid containers, not some complex assembly with multiple moving parts. Did the raw material come from someplace else or are they saying it's made here because they put all the bottoms and tops together here? BTW, this was in a big red, white, and blue display with "American Summer" emblazoned everywhere. This was the only thing I saw with Made in the USA on it. Everything else was Hecho en China.

                According to wikinvest.com, Rubbermaid outsourced 75 percent of it's manufacturing to China in 2007. Perhaps the other 25 percent is there now.

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                • #9
                  it is a sad state of affairs when our companies have to resort to an "assembled" clause to either appease and confuse the customers or avoid an import tariff. we've given in to the fact that if we want a tool, we won't be buying traditional american made quality anymore, because it's just too expensive to even manufacture them now. we go the route of the asian import, and then analyze the nation of origin to try to determine which is the lesser of the evils.

                  for the last 30+ years we've let everything be done overseas to save a buck at the manufacturing level and the consumer level, without a thought of the future generations. i barely remember a time when japanese autos were still inferior to ours, but now they are considered to be superior on many levels. the same happened with machinery. when i was younger, we joked about the quality of anything made in taiwan. now when we look for a machine tool, we choose the taiwan tool because it is likely to be a little better quality than the chinese. in a few decades, chinese made may well be the cream of the crop. the one thing to remember through all of this... when we talk about american made machinery, we're generally referring to something made in the 40's through the 80's. we're still using a lot of these tools now, but what about in 20 more years? our manufacturing legacy will be pretty well gone.

                  make no mistake about it - i'm not advocating that we boycott anything foreign - i'm not against foreign industry, and in some ways it's probably been the driving force to bring some developing countries into the age of the middle class. i'm all for capitalism, but not at the cost of a poverty stricken foreign country. what i'm against is big business as a whole. they outsource our work then sell it back to us at a huge markup, and pocket the difference as nice fat executive bonuses. rich get richer, middle class get poorer. if they outsource for a dime on the dollar, sell it back at the same rate and take a reasonable profit.

                  sorry for the rant, i'll grab my soapbox on the way out.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lost_cause
                    [The] rich get richer, middle class get poorer.
                    -Just a pet peeve of mine, but this oft-repeated nugget is complete horsecrap.

                    The supply of money is not "fixed". It's not like a company that earns $100 million a year, reduces the total stock of money by that much.

                    The fact of the matter is, the "poor" in the US make more money, and have a better standard of living than ever before.

                    And yes, that's despite record CEO salaries and hefty industry profits. When Wal-Mart earns $10 billion, do you think they keep it all in a big Scrooge McDuck style moneybin? Of course not- it's in banks (which lets banks loan it back out to others) in stocks (which helps the companies operate and expand) and other investments.

                    The reality is, when rich companies get richer, so do thousands of others. The much-derided 'trickle-down' economics is far truer than people give it credit for.

                    Doc.
                    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                      -Just a pet peeve of mine, but this oft-repeated nugget is complete horsecrap.

                      The supply of money is not "fixed". It's not like a company that earns $100 million a year, reduces the total stock of money by that much.

                      The fact of the matter is, the "poor" in the US make more money, and have a better standard of living than ever before.

                      And yes, that's despite record CEO salaries and hefty industry profits. When Wal-Mart earns $10 billion, do you think they keep it all in a big Scrooge McDuck style moneybin? Of course not- it's in banks (which lets banks loan it back out to others) in stocks (which helps the companies operate and expand) and other investments.

                      The reality is, when rich companies get richer, so do thousands of others. The much-derided 'trickle-down' economics is far truer than people give it credit for.

                      Doc.
                      I agree, if the boss goes broke so does his workers.

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                      • #12
                        I don't understand the problem. The unions in USA created many of the manufacturing outsourcing events.

                        I think just because you can reproduce doesn't mean you should. Too many people think they are owed a living.

                        I took all the risks in my investments and in business. When a worker loses a job he goes and gets a new one. When a business owner goes broke he loses everything. If I take the risks I feel I am entitled to the gains.

                        My father had a small business with thirty men working for him. Many for a long time 20+ years. He paid for weddings, operations, college for a lot of the kids of his workers. Some paid it back, most not. Then the workers decided they were going to join the union and make it a union shop. My father did not want the union in his shop for many reasons. The workers actually made more money than they would by union pay scale.

                        So anyway, they had meetings and such and finally they had a vote to go union. My dad was at this meeting. When they finished he asked if that was their final answer about the union. They said yes. Then he told them the company was closed and they were all terminated. He told them to leave all the company trucks in the yard and not drive them home like they normally did. Call their wives to come pick them up.

                        He then told them he only kept the company going for the workers and when they think they are going to tell him how to run his company then that was not an option for him. The enjoyment of running the company was over. Company closed.

                        His three longest employee's that were with him when he started the company he helped them to set up their own company and gave them all his contracts and financed their startup. Those three voted no on the union deal and tried to tell the other workers that they had it better how it was. The others didn't listened to them and told them they had the "right" to go union. They told them it would not go over with my father. They bowed up and said my father couldn't stop them.

                        I learned that lesson when I was very young. It was a great lesson.
                        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                        • #13
                          Black Forest, that story is a classic "Don't bite the hand that feeds you". Sorry your father had to go through that, but seems he handled it well. As a small (VERY SMALL) business owner I can relate. Employees, that have taken ZERO risk and invested ZERO equity, who don't even know of the YEARS of sacrifice and long hours, want to come in and tell the owner how to run the business!?!?!?! Two words come to mind...YOUR FIRED!
                          James Kilroy

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                            -Just a pet peeve of mine, but this oft-repeated nugget is complete horsecrap.

                            The supply of money is not "fixed". It's not like a company that earns $100 million a year, reduces the total stock of money by that much.

                            The fact of the matter is, the "poor" in the US make more money, and have a better standard of living than ever before.

                            And yes, that's despite record CEO salaries and hefty industry profits. When Wal-Mart earns $10 billion, do you think they keep it all in a big Scrooge McDuck style moneybin? Of course not- it's in banks (which lets banks loan it back out to others) in stocks (which helps the companies operate and expand) and other investments.

                            The reality is, when rich companies get richer, so do thousands of others. The much-derided 'trickle-down' economics is far truer than people give it credit for.

                            Doc.

                            Really, well have you looked around lately 'cause it ain't trickling down fast enough, the rich are getting richer and there are more of the "well off poor" then ever.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                            • #15
                              I don't get much chance to read the labels on stuff at stores. I leave the house to buy groceries and maybe get clothing at the thrift store, and most of that stuff has no packaging so no labels indicating where it comes from. Made in China, Hencho en Mexico, Assembled in USA. Makes no difference to me. I guess they slap those on new merchandise. Sorry - I don't bother going where that stuff is. Last thing I bought was a welder from a garage sale. After I fixed it up I needed the money worse, so I sold it to pay a bill.

                              Interesting that the folks in agreement that things are just fine for the waged worker are actually business owners. I'm sure you work and maybe even work hard. Yaay for you. That's cool and all, but you aren't union candidates anyway, being in charge of your own destiny to begin with. Throwing a blanket over the powerless masses and saying "shame on you" for preferring union support only demonstrates that you have your head in the sand. Sure there are morons who want to screw their employer. Most employers I've ever met want what they want and don't care about their workers other than how much cash they generate. So half the world is all screwed up. That's nothing new. Just don't forget about the other half. (OK maybe it's more like 90/10, but I'm just saying...)

                              I'd prefer to have built up a business of my own too, but apparently I'm not wired to deal with that correctly. So I'm just destined to work all day to bring home about 75% of what it takes to stay alive and indoors. I guess in your eyes, even though I work pretty hard and am pretty good at what I do, I don't deserve to have anything or even survive anyway, so screw me. You have the right to think that if you want. Don't bother asking for the time of day though.

                              Call me crazy, but I am of the opinion that if I work a full time job and near the top end of a skilled trade and live frugal than anybody else I know, seems like I should expect money to be less of a problem as time goes by. I'll tell you this - nothing is trickling down. Every year gets tougher and I've never seen it go downhill faster than the past five years has brought. I kid you not when I say in a few years I expect to own next to nothing and be camping for a living. And there are an increasing number of folks like me.

                              Wealth is trickling down huh? Dream on. Unbelievable. You probably ought to clam up before somebody hands you your sign.

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