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Ebay's "Buy It Never"

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools

    Originally Posted by D_Harris
    The "BIN's, reserves, premiums and all the other crappola..." are all part of the "free market auction".

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.



    Actually they are not.

    They are attempts to weight the transaction in the seller's favor.

    Wise buyers strive for a level playing field...knowing that it is their money that makes the system work.

    Any item is worthless if no one is willing to buy it.

    TMT
    TMT, Darren is correct; let me explain what a free market. its one where buyer and seller are free to act in their own best and price is set as they may agree vs say a government (marketing board) imposed price/terms. There can be any number of terms and conditions involved, buyer and seller's position are in tension and its expected many buyers and sellers won't reach a deal. It could be a cash transactions for rutabagas in the Casbah or a 100 page supply agreement between two corps - so long as they're agreed to without third party interference they're free market

    You've proffered an environment on the other hand where sellers are not free to offer things as they see fit, which is not what a free market is....in your version of a free market sellers can only hit the bid and are never allowed to post an asking price (reserve or whatever you want to call it)? you'd have to sell a Harig fixture for $10 if no one else that day happened to want one? Your thoughts seem only to factor the demand side but it takes supply and demand to make a market

    Think of how a stock market, a common (mostly) free market, works. A seller can put an ask out or hit a bid - and is free to put that ask at anything they want. Also, for a great deal of the time a market will sit stalemated between the bid and ask before a side moves, do you thank that disqualifies it as a free market?


    Any item is worthless if no one is willing to buy it.
    Sort of but time and market exposure factor in. I've had ebay listings expire only to sell them months later for lots of dough - they were hardly worthless on the first go around, just that there was no demand at that time or the market was so narrow the right buyer just hadn't seen it
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-07-2010, 08:01 PM.

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  • squirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by Farbmeister
    I'd really like to know where he lives... the 'I rarely pay listed price' or whatever it was bears some explanation. Commodities are generally not negotiable. Luxury items somewhat.

    Every now and again there are some locals that simply are easier to deal with by giving them a nickle off a can of soup than listen to them blather on about prices. When I ran my business you would not believe how much 'good will' can be bought by reducing the price $1. But not for everyone. That adds up to thousands very quickly.

    I guess if you go to an actual MARKET for food you can haggle... but I have better things to do that try and talk down an extra quarter off some banana's or beef.
    I was wondering about that too. The great deal was the $20% off new when Haas had the big blow out sale last year and we picked up a VMC. Wish I had more money at the time and I would have bought more. Other than that it is full price for Solidworks, Mastercam and all the other items. The other recent good deal is Cabela's, they have a sale going on now for 500 rounds of .223 for $109 and that includes a plastic ammo box.

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  • Farbmeister
    replied
    I'd really like to know where he lives... the 'I rarely pay listed price' or whatever it was bears some explanation. Commodities are generally not negotiable. Luxury items somewhat.

    Every now and again there are some locals that simply are easier to deal with by giving them a nickle off a can of soup than listen to them blather on about prices. When I ran my business you would not believe how much 'good will' can be bought by reducing the price $1. But not for everyone. That adds up to thousands very quickly.

    I guess if you go to an actual MARKET for food you can haggle... but I have better things to do that try and talk down an extra quarter off some banana's or beef.

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  • squirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by JCHannum
    I find as often as not that when I list an auction with the BIN option, people will bid it up past what the original BIN price was.

    I will say that eBay sales are usually sluggish this time of the year, but they seem to be more so this year than previously.
    They are down considerably, when they dumped all the "eBay store" items into core search & category sections it is now like wee-wee-ing in the ocean. The lathe section went from average 800 listings to over 4500, too many for any one to browse. Now buyers are overwhelmed with cheap crap that did not sell and was "hidden" in the eBay store. The only reason it was listed was due to the low .10 cent fee per month, so who cares if it would sell. Sellers that optimized inventory and paid the higher listing fees are now lost in the sea of junk. Our sales dropped 65% within a couple of days of the change and they are still holding at about 45% down.......Seasonal drop would only be in single digits, even in 2008
    Last edited by squirrel; 07-06-2010, 09:04 PM.

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    I find as often as not that when I list an auction with the BIN option, people will bid it up past what the original BIN price was.

    I will say that eBay sales are usually sluggish this time of the year, but they seem to be more so this year than previously.

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  • D_Harris
    replied
    That can of Pork n' Beans on the supermarket shelf has a reserve price on it. But I'm sure they'll take more if you give it to them.

    I decided to cancel my initial auction, which had no reserve, but did have a "Buy-It-Now".

    It now has a reserve and no "But-It-Now.

    There is one bid at this time and I don't care if it goes no higher.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=140423535581

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by squirrel
    You are 100% correct on that, your statement brought back memories when we switched over from all .99 NO RESERVE auctions to fixed price. We had over 25 NASTY EMAILS telling us how dare we go to fixed price and its "their right to buy at auction" and we will never buy from you again, we even had a few morons actually call the office and yell my staff and tell us how dare we do that, I was shocked. One of the guys was pretty decent and said he was buying from us for years and reselling it on the PM site and eBay and would hope that we would go back to the auction format.

    No bidder has any such rights over your property. The owner has all right, title and interest in his or her personal property. Until the sale is complete title to said property does not pass. Then, when the item is received by the happy new buyer, he or she can do anything they wish with it, including selling it at reserve or maybe burning it.

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  • squirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by Farbmeister


    If you don't like the price, then pass. As one guy stated all the pissing and moaning about price simply means that you want it but cannot afford it, or need it and cannot wait. Neither of those issues are a sellers problem.
    You are 100% correct on that, your statement brought back memories when we switched over from all .99 NO RESERVE auctions to fixed price. We had over 25 NASTY EMAILS telling us how dare we go to fixed price and its "their right to buy at auction" and we will never buy from you again, we even had a few morons actually call the office and yell my staff and tell us how dare we do that, I was shocked. One of the guys was pretty decent and said he was buying from us for years and reselling it on the PM site and eBay and would hope that we would go back to the auction format.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Farbmeister
    TMT is trying to cherry pick the best (or worst) or each market system to his own advantage.

    I don't know where hes from, but YES, some parts of the world haggling (not bartering) is expected and essential. While that definitely falls into the 'free market' it generally is not widely used in the USA. Although it never hurts to ask a manager for a 10% 'Managers Discount' the odds of getting one are less than even.

    Most US retailers ave gone to great lengths to determine a price that cover costs and provides profits for the future. 40% of a business plan is figuring costs and the other 50% is marketing, with 10% fluff.

    Back to e-bay.. reserves are a vital part of an items value. If you sell a rare X and its won for $0.99 then the next rare X's value is compromised.. past selling prices can dramatically affect valuation (look at housing prices... the cost of other houses on the street has a very strong influence on the value of the house for sale).

    If you don't like the price, then pass. As one guy stated all the pissing and moaning about price simply means that you want it but cannot afford it, or need it and cannot wait. Neither of those issues are a sellers problem.

    Quite right. As I mentioned in an earlier post, there are some items, usually collectibles, that have a known price. Selling them at auction might have great risk if there were no reserve set.

    Take a look at the Christie's Auction site. Many of the valuables sold there will have reserves set. It simply means that the owner will not take less. If it sells for reserve or more, fine. If not, then he takes it home to wait for another day.

    I'm mainly interested in musical instruments and have been collecting (and playing them) for more than 40 years. While I don't often bid, I do watch the auctions. Within the past year, Roy Rogers' 1930 OM-45 C.F. Martin guitar, the one he played with the Sons of the Pioneers and elsewhere was put up for auction at Christies. It sold for $375 plus the buyer's premium, a total of more than $400,000.

    I don't recall the exact reserve that was set. It might have been around $100,000. This shows that when an item has a wide appeal among collectors, a reserve makes absolutely no difference.

    His other personal items from his museum, including his Horse, Trigger (stuffed it was) are also going up at Chiristies. Should they list that at 99 cents to make the bidders feel good?

    I only use a reserve when I know that something is unique. So what? If you don't like a reserve, don't bid. No harm, no fault. No sense carping and bitching about what someone else does with their own, rightfully bought property.

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  • Farbmeister
    replied
    TMT is trying to cherry pick the best (or worst) or each market system to his own advantage.

    I don't know where hes from, but YES, some parts of the world haggling (not bartering) is expected and essential. While that definitely falls into the 'free market' it generally is not widely used in the USA. Although it never hurts to ask a manager for a 10% 'Managers Discount' the odds of getting one are less than even.

    Most US retailers ave gone to great lengths to determine a price that cover costs and provides profits for the future. 40% of a business plan is figuring costs and the other 50% is marketing, with 10% fluff.

    Back to e-bay.. reserves are a vital part of an items value. If you sell a rare X and its won for $0.99 then the next rare X's value is compromised.. past selling prices can dramatically affect valuation (look at housing prices... the cost of other houses on the street has a very strong influence on the value of the house for sale).

    If you don't like the price, then pass. As one guy stated all the pissing and moaning about price simply means that you want it but cannot afford it, or need it and cannot wait. Neither of those issues are a sellers problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • squirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by D_Harris
    Ok, perhaps where you live it is different, but the barter system is not in effect over here. When I walk into a super market or any store I have no choice but to pay retail.

    As far as the exodus from eBay, Perhaps it is the high fees they charge along with all the system "improvements" that make the buying and selling experience worse with each change.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
    You are correct on that, its more policy BS that prompted our own website. When they removed the sellers ability to leave negative feedback for buyers that was the motivator for us.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Is it a fact that there is a mass exodus from eBay by account holders? Does anyone have a link showing this to be a fact? I've heard people speak about this but I'd like to see some data.

    I've been on eBay since 2000 and my only complaint is that the fees have gone up for sellers. I don't sell much anymore but when I buy, I don't seem to have any trouble.

    If everybody leaves, maybe it will be easier for the rest of us who aren't leaving. Ya think?

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  • D_Harris
    replied
    Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools
    I rarely pay what the retailer intially wants.

    Smart buyers rarely do.

    The way capitalism works is that sellers TRY to get the MOST they can while buyers TRY to pay the LEAST they can.

    As to the original subject Ebay Buy It Nevers, sellers are hiding behind Buy It Nevers in an attempt to shore up prices in a deflationary economy...and buyers are sitting on their wallets waiting for prices to fall..as they will.

    As I said, I have ceased spending money on Ebay with their silly Buy It Nevers since I can and do go to other selling venues and get better value for my dollars. I am not alone in this exodus from Ebay.

    TMT
    Ok, perhaps where you live it is different, but the barter system is not in effect over here. When I walk into a super market or any store I have no choice but to pay retail.

    As far as the exodus from eBay, Perhaps it is the high fees they charge along with all the system "improvements" that make the buying and selling experience worse with each change.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by D_Harris
    Well, since you want to put those rules in place. Let's take all the price tags off of all the merchandise the next time you walk into any store. After all, those are just "reserves" put in place by those fearful sellers to weigh the transaction in their favor.

    And going by what you are saying, if anything is left on the shelf by closing time then regardless of it's price tag, this would mean that the "free market" finds it worthless.

    In all formats sellers have always tried to "weight the transaction" in their favor. That's capitalism at work.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
    I rarely pay what the retailer intially wants.

    Smart buyers rarely do.

    The way capitalism works is that sellers TRY to get the MOST they can while buyers TRY to pay the LEAST they can.

    As to the original subject Ebay Buy It Nevers, sellers are hiding behind Buy It Nevers in an attempt to shore up prices in a deflationary economy...and buyers are sitting on their wallets waiting for prices to fall..as they will.

    As I said, I have ceased spending money on Ebay with their silly Buy It Nevers since I can and do go to other selling venues and get better value for my dollars. I am not alone in this exodus from Ebay.

    TMT

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by gnm109
    You do sound bitter. You must have had some trouble sometime on an auction. Out of deference to you, I think I'll start using reserves again on my auctions.

    You don't like being insulted and I don't like having everything I say contradicted for no reason.
    Not bitter...just honest. ;<)

    Do what you wish with your auctions...it is your stuff to sell and my money to spend...that is if the "right" auction comes along.

    And that "right" auction won't have a reserve. ;<)

    Good luck with your efforts in this recession where cash is king.

    TMT

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