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More facemill exercises. Make you own for a buck.

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  • #46
    Not yet but it will work just fine. This isn't the first such tool I have made. I make most of my tool holders with the exception of collets. There are many ways to skin the cat. A fly cutter type of tool is nothing more than a lathe bit that rotates instead of the work. You can recycle worn out end mills by grinding the end in the approximate shape of a regular lathe tool lying horizontally with some relief. It will do a very nice job of taking light cuts.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #47
      I expected as much but -had- to ask!

      The fly cutter I use in my little benchtop mill has never done a satisfactory job IMHO. That is a good size for the material I work with mostly. Thanks for the post!
      Mike N

      Occasional maker of swarf.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by PaulT
        I would suspect its probably case hardened in the seat area, if you think about it there's no reason to do any more than case hardening on most tooling. But as I stated earlier, its still surprising how much high end tooling is not made from a particularly hard steel or even has case hardening.

        Paul T.
        It may be easier to just make it out of a hardenable tool steel and heat-treat the whole works. Case hardening isn't really so much easier than any other process.... it used to be a lot cheaper, but these days the process time likely costs as much as material is cheaper.

        I have a Sandvik cut-off tool that I needed to trim the shank of, because it was a size too big for my toolpost (5/8 instead of 1/2). That thing was harder than the hobs of hell, and it was hard right through.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #49
          Just saw this thread - glad to see I'm not the only nut making bits from bolts. Mine was a quick one-use wood bit, turned on the mill and hand filed but not hardened:





          It's posted as a quick part of a long repair "blog" - -

          http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Blog...8/37d28_1.html
          Cheers,

          Frank Ford
          HomeShopTech

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          • #50
            Are you guys not concerned with the bolt threads damaging your collets, or have you removed the threads?

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            • #51
              They don't damage a lathe chuck. A collet clamps near the opening with little force much past that.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #52
                If you are concerned about the threads, why not get a long bolt and cut them off...?

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Tony Ennis
                  Are you guys not concerned with the bolt threads damaging your collets, or have you removed the threads?

                  Not me. You may notice that my bolt is just a regular one, not hardened.
                  Cheers,

                  Frank Ford
                  HomeShopTech

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                  • #54
                    That would booger an ER type collet if gripped on the threads....
                    Mike N

                    Occasional maker of swarf.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Twmaster
                      That would booger an ER type collet if gripped on the threads....

                      Right. See my post # 52.

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                      • #56
                        It would do and even better job if it spun

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