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More facemill exercises. Make you own for a buck.

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  • More facemill exercises. Make you own for a buck.

    It's a face mill with only one insert. Hey, isn't that a fly cutter? Why yes, it is and so is a facemill. This took about an hour to make and I was slowed down because I work slow and was taking pictures.







    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    Nice. I'd like to build one. I wonder which insert number you are using?

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    • #3
      The insert is a Tungaloy TCMT11024-PM, Made in Japan
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        and i have a ****t load of those kind of bolts i am going to scrap . . . . . .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Evan
          The insert is a Tungaloy TCMT11024-PM, Made in Japan

          Thanks. I have a set of TCMT lathe holders and lots of spare inserts. I'm tempted to make a face mill unit like yours. Good photos!

          I've had an R8-mounted 1-1/2" facemill for some time. It uses 3 TPG-32 inserts and does a pretty good job. Nonetheless, I like the idea of producing my own tools so I'll have a go at it soon.

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          • #6
            Evan, that is ELEGANT! I have one silly question. Given the cut loads, does it really need a grade 8 bolt? It seems to me that just about ANY 3/4" bolt-shaped object would be more than adequate for a tool carrier.
            Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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            • #7
              The one reason for the grade 8 bolt is for the threads to hold the insert. Cheese metal just doesn't hold up.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Of course! Silly of me to not think of that.
                Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                • #9
                  Evan, I Googled on that part number and nothing came up except for your post.

                  Is the rake and relief built into the insert or have you milled the bolt with these attributes in mind?

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                  • #10
                    Wow evan, did you use HSS to cut that grade 8 bolt??

                    If so, what feed/speeds/DOC/WOC where you using?

                    I allways thought grade 8 bolts would be too hard for HSS mills/HSS bandsaws blades/etc and allways only used abrasives on them.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tony Ennis
                      Evan, I Googled on that part number and nothing came up except for your post.

                      Is the rake and relief built into the insert or have you milled the bolt with these attributes in mind?
                      It might be Tungaloy TCMT110204-PM
                      http://www.tungaloyamerica.com/pdf/700%20L.pdf

                      Great project Evan

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                      • #12
                        Evan - nice project. Always good to see ideas for making tooling.


                        Originally posted by davidh
                        and i have a ****t load of those kind of bolts i am going to scrap . . . . . .
                        What? scrap perfectly good bolts.... What?

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                        • #13
                          The inserts are positive-positive so no additional rake or relief is required. That makes the project that much easier. About the only thing that is somewhat critical is accurate placement of the tapped hole. FYI, the inserts require a 4-40 holding screw.

                          Grade 8 bolts in that size are easy to machine since they don't cool quickly after forming operations. You might run into some that are too hard to work easily but that isn't very common. In order to meet the strength specification they must have a certain amount of ductility since they must be able to be stretched when installed. They cut just fine with HSS tooling as you can see from the pocket I made with a cheap end mill.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Nice one Evan,

                            John
                            John

                            I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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                            • #15
                              Face Mill

                              I have made a lot of different insert tools out of drill rod. Face mills, Drills, Chamfer tools, End Mills, and Thread Mills. When drilling and tapping for the screws, I find the center of the hole in the insert with the pointed end of an edge/center finder on an insert seated in the pocket, then go .003 toward center and .003 upward so the screw holds the insert firmly in the seat when tightened. I have found that a center finder with the point ground off a little can be a very handy item. Center finders are cheap. I have several.

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