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More facemill exercises. Make you own for a buck.

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    It would do and even better job if it spun

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Twmaster
    That would booger an ER type collet if gripped on the threads....

    Right. See my post # 52.

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  • Twmaster
    replied
    That would booger an ER type collet if gripped on the threads....

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  • Frank Ford
    replied
    Originally posted by Tony Ennis
    Are you guys not concerned with the bolt threads damaging your collets, or have you removed the threads?

    Not me. You may notice that my bolt is just a regular one, not hardened.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    If you are concerned about the threads, why not get a long bolt and cut them off...?

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  • Evan
    replied
    They don't damage a lathe chuck. A collet clamps near the opening with little force much past that.

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  • Tony Ennis
    replied
    Are you guys not concerned with the bolt threads damaging your collets, or have you removed the threads?

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  • Frank Ford
    replied
    Just saw this thread - glad to see I'm not the only nut making bits from bolts. Mine was a quick one-use wood bit, turned on the mill and hand filed but not hardened:





    It's posted as a quick part of a long repair "blog" - -

    http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Blog...8/37d28_1.html

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by PaulT
    I would suspect its probably case hardened in the seat area, if you think about it there's no reason to do any more than case hardening on most tooling. But as I stated earlier, its still surprising how much high end tooling is not made from a particularly hard steel or even has case hardening.

    Paul T.
    It may be easier to just make it out of a hardenable tool steel and heat-treat the whole works. Case hardening isn't really so much easier than any other process.... it used to be a lot cheaper, but these days the process time likely costs as much as material is cheaper.

    I have a Sandvik cut-off tool that I needed to trim the shank of, because it was a size too big for my toolpost (5/8 instead of 1/2). That thing was harder than the hobs of hell, and it was hard right through.

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  • Twmaster
    replied
    I expected as much but -had- to ask!

    The fly cutter I use in my little benchtop mill has never done a satisfactory job IMHO. That is a good size for the material I work with mostly. Thanks for the post!

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  • Evan
    replied
    Not yet but it will work just fine. This isn't the first such tool I have made. I make most of my tool holders with the exception of collets. There are many ways to skin the cat. A fly cutter type of tool is nothing more than a lathe bit that rotates instead of the work. You can recycle worn out end mills by grinding the end in the approximate shape of a regular lathe tool lying horizontally with some relief. It will do a very nice job of taking light cuts.

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  • Twmaster
    replied
    Evan,

    Have you tried this tool on mild steel?

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  • PaulT
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers
    I have some Dorian insert tooling and it is "reasonably" hard.......
    I would suspect its probably case hardened in the seat area, if you think about it there's no reason to do any more than case hardening on most tooling. But as I stated earlier, its still surprising how much high end tooling is not made from a particularly hard steel or even has case hardening.

    Paul T.

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  • Evan
    replied
    My question to Evan was why so slow a feed that the cut per tooth was in the tenths, with carbide inserts? Inserts are not usually good at "dusting off tenths".
    I missed that you asked me a question.

    The feed was slow to maximize the finish regularity although if you look I also ran a pass at only 500 rpm and 5 ipm which shows no discernable difference.

    On the 6061 piece I ran 3 passes back and forth with no change in depth of cut to eliminate, as much as possible, any irregularity from machine vibration. There isn't much vibration with my machine since I am using a 24 volt DC 3 phase brushless motor with closed loop speed control as the main drive motor.

    These particular inserts are very sharp and will cut regardless of the light chip load. They are high positive rake but are also very fragile compared to standard neutral rake inserts.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by PaulT
    In my experience, most tooling is not made from particularly hard steel, even the high priced stuff. Grab one of your most expensive non-chinese or indian pieces of tooling and draw a file edge on an inconspicuous spot on it and you'll see what I mean.

    Paul T.
    I have some Dorian insert tooling and it is "reasonably" hard......

    I agree very hard is not needed, but that is off-topic.

    The point is that grade 8 is not usually so hard that one should be concerned about cutting it. if it IS that hard, there may actually be a problem with it, it may be off-spec for strength.

    Originally posted by bnm109
    I have an excuse. My big Webb tops out at 4,200 rpm....but your theory is good.
    The speed is fine, it's the FEED I was questioning.

    My question to Evan was why so slow a feed that the cut per tooth was in the tenths, with carbide inserts? Inserts are not usually good at "dusting off tenths".

    I would expect a couple-three turns just rubbing, and then a cut, then 2 or 3 more just rubbing, then a cut, etc, etc.

    Is there some question about the tool that suggests the tiny cut, or is it just "what happened"?

    He could have increased the feed, or slowed the speed. Either could easily increase the cut per tooth to 0.001 or so which is more in the usual range (and 5 times what he had).

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