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  • Show us your small home built machines !

    I hope this topic has not been covered at any time in the recent past

    Show us your small home built machines. I'm talking small, precision drill presses, small lathes (think Levin size or so), small milling machines (Evan's is too big to qualify ), grinders and more.

    It would be especially interesting to see special or limited purpose small machines such as a tiny lathe that is based on a 5C collet as the main work holder but tiny in all other respects. Or maybe a drill press for #60 and lower drilling. Perhaps a tiny horizontal mill for a special use.

    I guess I'm thinking 1 to 1.5 toasters in size.

    Den
    Last edited by nheng; 06-21-2010, 09:41 PM.

  • #2
    I set up my Unimat to use WW collets

    Removed the spindle, bored it to take a draw bar. Tapered the spindle nose for the WW collets. Made a draw bar out of SS. Now I can turn an eye lash. Started to make a block so that I can use my dremel hand piece to use as an ID / OD grinder. BTW a light dimmer makes a nice speed control. Also got onto the motor so that with a flick of a switch I can run the lathe in reverse.
    The unimat is my first lathe, 1968. Now have a 10EE. and a B'port

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    • #3
      Here are several pictures of a drill press I built for drilling pc boards. It has an x-y table which if I'm not mistaken has a range of 6x8 inches, or maybe it's 8x10- I don't remember. I built this about 25 years ago. I don't think I've posted this before-









      The thing is built from 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch mdf, and is heavily fiberglassed. The green coloring is something I had left over at the time, so I used it. Mistake- it took the better part of ten years to finally cure to a non-tacky finish. It was dry and hard to use after a couple days, so no problem, but the tackiness stayed on- and on- and on- it was the fault of the color, not the hardener or the resin- strange, but true. Anyway, the motor is something I made up from parts in my usual way- doubled up the length of the armature stack and the magnet stack, rewound of course, etc. The slides are drawer slides, same on the x-y table. The slide assembly itself can be repositioned up or down, then the motor head can be cranked up or down like a drill press. I made the helical rack for that myself, and it's spring loaded so you can let go the knob and it stays where you leave it. Between the two motions I've got about a 5 inch vertical range of motion.

      Underside you can see the threaded rods which are my leadscrews. I get .050 per full turn of those knobs, so it's easy to get .1 inch spacing for the dual inline ic packages (remember those?). There's a couple of buttons that you can press to release the split nuts and rapid traverse the tables.
      Last edited by darryl; 06-22-2010, 02:16 AM.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #4


        You might be able to see the drill bit in it right now. Maybe not- it's pretty small. I got a set of those carbide drills that have 1/8 inch shanks and come in several bit sizes. That's normally what I use for pc board drilling. Easy enough to mount with that dremel type collet chuck.





        Somewhere there you can see a green wire coming off the motor. I feed it from an adjustable power supply, and normally use about 30 to 40 volts. In one of the pictures I have the tables moved full left and rearwards. In another pic I have the table full right and forward. I was trying to show the range of motion- .



        I've had pretty good luck using drawer slides for things like this. The motor assembly is somewhat pinched in there, and there's no play but it operates smoothly. If this wasn't the case, I'd be snapping carbide bits like toothpicks. My lathe drill press also uses these slides, under some pinching as well to remove slop, and it's been good.

        I dunno- does that fit the 1 1/2 toaster size category?
        Last edited by darryl; 06-22-2010, 02:23 AM.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          How about a 20,000 rpm spindle that fits inside an R8 collet?

          I kind of promised George I would write an article on how to build it but I haven't gotten around to it yet. Maybe I will if enough people want to see it. For some reason I really don't like writing articles for publication. I have in the past for other magazines and it really takes me a long time.

          Last edited by Evan; 06-22-2010, 03:22 AM.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            I think there'd be a lot of interest in that Evan. Handy to be able to use a small carbide cutter in a conventional mill, if that's what it allows!
            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
            Monarch 10EE 1942

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            • #7
              Which bearings and drive source Evan, no, seriously.

              Regards Ian.
              You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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              • #8
                Darryl,

                Love the PC board drill press. I'm curious about how the button to release the split nuts works. Could you post a close up of that mechanism?

                Also, how do you operate the up/down motion of the drill?
                Lee

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                • #9
                  Darryl,
                  As usual a very nice piece of work.
                  Evan,
                  I would definitely be interested in learning more about your spindle. It looks like the perfect solution for engraving etc.
                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    Evan, That is a 3/4" R-8 collet. Could your spindle ALSO fit an M-3 collet? Then I would want the build article on my wish-list too.
                    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                    • #11
                      What is the ID of an M-3 collet?
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Which end??
                        You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                        • #13
                          i posted this a little while ago, but here it is again. a little CNC lathe for doing woood turnings. I have only used it to make the pawn from the emc2 sample file, but eventually it will be used for pens, chess pieces, mini baseball bats, and anything else i can think of to fit.





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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Evan
                            How about a 20,000 rpm spindle that fits inside an R8 collet?
                            Want!!!!!!

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                            • #15
                              OK, I'll do the article. It may take a while though. I will say that there are no special order parts.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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