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  • #16
    Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools
    ***
    I would like to SEE what others have to move a machine from a trailer to the floor of their shops...dock plates, end gates, ramps, etc. *** TMT
    I think that the most useful and powerful tool for moving heavy machinery is patience. Then, the right equipment. I've rented a drop-bed trailer from Sunbelt Rentals that drops the whole bed down to 4" off the deck. Easy soll on and off with just pipes and straps. That's a 1,500lb Gorton O-16/A mill in the in the pallett wrap caccoon. I've also moved a 3,000lb Hendey shaper with this trailer:



    Sunbelt also rents a device called a Roll-O-Lift. Basically a small forklift in its own right. A pair get strapped to the machine, then jacked up a few inches and moved as a unit. It was very convenient:





    Once on the shop floor the machine could be rolled to its resting place by one man. Well worth the investment.

    Bob

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bob Farr
      I think that the most useful and powerful tool for moving heavy machinery is patience. Then, the right equipment.

      Sunbelt also rents a device called a Roll-O-Lift. Basically a small forklift in its own right. A pair get strapped to the machine, then jacked up a few inches and moved as a unit. It was very convenient:

      Bob
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      Nice gear Bob. It sure beats the heck out of dropping the wheels off the trailer and running on bare rims which I have needed to do in the past. 1, was to get the machine inside the shed, and 2, to get the machine down to a safer level for of unloading.
      Ken.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by speedy
        It sure beats the heck out of dropping the wheels off the trailer and running on bare rims which I have needed to do in the past. 1, was to get the machine inside the shed, and 2, to get the machine down to a safer level for of unloading.
        Ha ha, have never had to do that but we did once dig holes for the trailer wheels so that the trailer was flat on the ground, worked a treat!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
          Ha ha, have never had to do that but we did once dig holes for the trailer wheels so that the trailer was flat on the ground, worked a treat!

          That's a new one, heard of flattening tires though to get in under a garage header.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools
            Thanks for the picture.

            In the recent moves I helped with, the machines were from private owners hundreds of miles away where one bought what you thought you might need...but without seeing the actual location one is always guessing. One cannot assume that the seller has any rigging or moving equipment.
            TMT

            You described that move to a T. It was over 400 miles each way. I knew I had to bring everything with me. You are also right in that it is slow going. I personally would be willing to pay hansomely to rent one of those drop bed trailers, but there are none around here to rent that I know of.

            ME

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Michael Edwards
              I personally would be willing to pay hansomely to rent one of those drop bed trailers, but there are none around here to rent that I know of.
              I rented one to move my mill and it was only $65. Well worth it.
              Stuart de Haro

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Bob Farr
                Sunbelt also rents a device called a Roll-O-Lift. Basically a small forklift
                in its own right. A pair get strapped to the machine, then jacked up a few
                inches and moved as a unit. It was very convenient:





                Once on the shop floor the machine could be rolled to its resting place
                by one man. Well worth the investment.

                Bob
                I have seen a variation of the Roll-O-Lift used to move large vending
                machines, but your photos have the first images I recall seeing of a tool
                that could move a lathe.

                Is there a stated lift capacity?

                .

                Comment


                • #23
                  I have been in the middle of moving my shop for the last couple of months and roll-a-lifts are one of the handiest things to use. The heaviest thing that I have moved with them is my Kaltenbach saw at about 2200 pounds and it took about 45 minutes from when I unhooked it from power to having it strapped down on the trailer.





                  While the lifts are easy for small things, I did get riggers for the big girls.







                  For big stuff (the Okumas are almost 11K pounds with the 4th mounted on them) a serious forklift and a good operator come in handy.

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                  • #24
                    I like those Roll-O-Lifts, did not know such a thing existed.
                    I googled a bit and found no place to buy or rent.
                    Is there another name or brand?
                    Plans for making my own?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Rex
                      I like those Roll-O-Lifts, did not know such a thing existed.
                      I googled a bit and found no place to buy or rent.
                      Is there another name or brand?
                      Plans for making my own?
                      paste this into Google:

                      "roll-a-lift": site:craigslist.org

                      there is a pair posted on CL in Albany, New York. Go here:

                      http://albany.craigslist.org/tls/1788041149.html

                      Seems to be a good price given they retail for over $1K a pair. However, looking at the pic it should not be too difficult to reverse engineer these lifts. That said, sometimes its better to buy a welded product (i.e. a receiver) just to avoid the potential liability issues.

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                      • #26
                        Rex,

                        MickeyD started a nice thread regarding Roll-A-Lifts a short time ago. There are some detailed pictures in his thread, but no construction plans that I'm aware of:

                        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41713

                        Another option that I've seen is to use what appear to be rolling jacks designed for a trailer tongue. Here's a pisture of them being used on a Monarch 10EE, which isn't a lite machine. I don't know the gent in the picture (I found it on the web, linked in another forum) so I hope he doesn't mind me reusing his picture here. A strong L-shaped bracket bolted to the jack would do the trick:

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Michael Edwards
                          *** I personally would be willing to pay hansomely to rent one of those drop bed trailers, but there are none around here to rent that I know of. ME
                          Michael,

                          The drop trailer is GREAT: it eases loading, keeps the center of gravity low (below the frame of the truck), and has a good assortment of strapping points. I don't remember the manufacturer's name but if I find it I'll let you know. Like Hornluv mentioned it was cheap to rent at around $65. The capacity on this single axle unit is 4,500lbs, and a double axle unit is available too. Here it is with a 3,000lb Hendey shaper:



                          TMT,

                          I don't have a picture of this lift with machinery on it, but I have used my motorcycle lift for putting small machinery and other heavy items into the truck. It happens to raise up to bed level so it's pretty easy to slide stuff onto and then lower it down to ground level. The problem is that the lift itself is quite heavy and takes up a lot of space in the bed of the truck:



                          I've seen larger scissor lifts at the shipping docks of some industrial parks. Perhaps such a unit could be adapted to a trailer axle to create a hybrid lift/trailer setup.

                          Bob

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                          • #28
                            I've considered the scissor lift. For me, the bending moment on those arms is too high to really trust a tall heavy machine to move 1 foot downward.

                            Unloading off the trailer is a process for me. First thing I do is jack the trailer UP. Remove all wheels. Put trailer back down, on frame. Disconnect from truck with jack, now jack tongue up, making whole trailer one large ramp. Not until then do I start to unstrap machine, with support to a comealong or winch to slowly let it off trailer. Then I just do the pipe roller method. It works.

                            Small vertical distances such as an inch are done with shims. There is an inch difference in the concrete getting into my garage. I now use 1" black pipe as rollers. I get the machine going, slide it into the garage...as long as it makes it two inches, I can again crowbar the front of the machine up and put another roller on it.

                            Larger vertical distances are done with shims. It's the same as the prior method, only you go up a crowbar lift at a time, shimming along the way, until you are a foot in the air. The first six inches is two timbers that are placed parallel to the direction of travel. This is your new rolling surface for your ramp. Down is the same way.

                            It's not hard, just take your time and be safe. Some of it may look dangerous, but if you take the time to understand your load and plan each inch, it's pretty safe.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              yep. Shims, lots of blocking, 4' long crowbar, rollers, 2x4's as tracks on soft ground is how I got my lathe/mill into the basement.. given a week or two time and effort

                              Oh, and a really good BRAND NEW tarp with 0 holes to go over it every night, or every time it was a little rainy.
                              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Great ideas

                                Dr Stan, thanks for the links. I'll start watching for those.
                                And thanks for reminding about a great way to search CL nationally.

                                Bob, I really like that trailer jack setup. I have seen some really HD versions at Northern tool for about $50. I'll be doing some shopping on those too.

                                I have been eyeballing those lift tables and Mcycle lifts at HF, but have yet to see one like yours. Where did you get it?

                                Do you guys have a pallet jack? Those things are very useful for moving machinery. I'm currently using mine for a mobile base under the Millrite.
                                You can buy them used for $50, sometimes less. I may have to get another to put under my lathe

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