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Loading/Unloading a Machine On/Off a Trailer

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  • Loading/Unloading a Machine On/Off a Trailer

    Recently I helped a friend load/unload several machines on/off his trailer.

    The loading/unloading process was to say the least an exercise in creativity.

    While he had a dock plate to allow the machines to be skidded/rolled on and off the trailer, the differences of an inch or so between the trailer/dock plate made it an interesting effort trying to shim the differences of height.

    I would like to SEE what others have to move a machine from a trailer to the floor of their shops...dock plates, end gates, ramps, etc.

    Also I would like to see anyone who has a dock at their home shop...another project that I am planning on building this year.

    Thanks

    TMT

  • #2
    Loading a 2800# shaper a few years ago. Not much weight. Steel ramps, pipe rollers and a come-a-long. Piece of cake.

    loading pic


    ME

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    • #3
      It seems every piece of equipment take a different approach, used, tubing like Micheal, come alongs, forklifts, cherry pickers, dollies, brute force, anything, everything.

      No dock here, my biggest plus is the fork lift but that only gets it off the trailer/flat bed, still have to get it inside where there is no room to maneuver any fork lift.

      Have out side (covered) awaiting room inside, shaper, surface grinder, and two drill press's.

      Comment


      • #4
        Let me down easy,
        Let me down slow.
        Let me down easy
        When it's time to go ...
        .
        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by TGTool
          Let me down easy,
          Let me down slow.
          Let me down easy
          When it's time to go ...
          That would qualify as a "Oh Crap" moment!

          Comment


          • #6
            Easy job

            I had my last machine delivered on a truck that came with a fork lift on the truck. He was marvelous - knew exactly what was needed done and did it. Put the machine exactly where I wanted it. Cost OZ$300 ~ US$255 - his trip was 2 x 45 Km (say 55 miles). I was not sure that my 1 ton hoist would have the reach or the lift to do it to get it off my trailer. The hoist did it easily once it was on the floor slab.

            My days of buggerising around and taking unnecessary risks for the sake of a few $ are long gone.

            Easy job.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ken_Shea
              That would qualify as a "Oh Crap" moment!
              No, no problem. The winch cable is easing it off with the kind assistance of gravity. Near the bottom it needs to be reared back a little to start the rollers. Once down, the winch cable loops through a pulley to a lally post and starts pulling to head it on over toward the building. Everybody was happy here. If I took pictures of the 3800 lb Milwaukee later taking the same trip I can't seem to find them.
              .
              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by TGTool
                No, no problem. The winch cable is easing it off with the kind assistance of gravity. Near the bottom it needs to be reared back a little to start the rollers. Once down, the winch cable loops through a pulley to a lally post and starts pulling to head it on over toward the building. Everybody was happy here. If I took pictures of the 3800 lb Milwaukee later taking the same trip I can't seem to find them.
                That's a relief, the picture looks like it was all bent/twisted/broke out of shape, so I thought.

                Comment


                • #9
                  TGTool
                  Gravity is a bitch.
                  Hanlon's Razor: "Never attribute to malice, that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."
                  Applicable in most Human Interchange.
                  K Lively
                  Last edited by polepenhollow; 06-22-2010, 02:42 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ken_Shea
                    That's a relief, the picture looks like it was all bent/twisted/broke out of shape, so I thought.
                    Well, the fact is the machine has it's problems but they're not immediately apparent. There's a mount for an overhead motor and 4sp gearbox that was connected to the horizontal flat belt drive that's been broken off from a fork lift accident earlier in its life. The Bridgeport head on the overarm is just rotated down for travel and the table is swiveled for no particular reason. The remaining parts of the overhead drive are still on the trailer.

                    Since getting it unloaded and placed I've repaired several small things, some from the drop and some other machine crashes and poor fixes. The vertical head is now on a VFD and I'm thinking of hanging a DC motor onto the table drive from the horizontal spindle.

                    Before it could be a horizontal mill again the spindle also needs repair. The original spindle is a B&S taper but it's been smacked so badly at some point there's a lump on the ID. I'm torn between re-establishing it as original and converting to a NMTB40 which there's just about enough material for. Otherwise there's very little wear on the leadscrews though the table has sagged over the years.
                    .
                    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TGTool
                      Let me down easy,
                      Let me down slow.
                      Let me down easy
                      When it's time to go ...
                      Looks familiar to me, and quite safe. You have it well secured and are using gravity as the power source. I purposely built my 6 X 8 heavy duty trailer as a tilt bed for such occasions and it works quite well.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use an engine hoist for light machines, use my car hoist for heavy machines.


                        I have used my car hoist for all kinds of lifting heavy things off of trucks or trailers.
                        Andy

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Michael Edwards
                          Loading a 2800# shaper a few years ago. Not much weight. Steel ramps, pipe rollers and a come-a-long. Piece of cake.

                          loading pic


                          ME
                          Thanks for the picture.

                          While this approach does work (it was the same that we just used in shimming, rolling, etc.), it takes a lot of time and the right stuff being present to do the rampping, shimming, height adjusting. In the recent moves I helped with, the machines were from private owners hundreds of miles away where one bought what you thought you might need...but without seeing the actual location one is always guessing. One cannot assume that the seller has any rigging or moving equipment.

                          And as usual, there is no forklift available at either end of the journey.

                          Has anyone built a trailer end gate/dock plate that works well as a ramp to offload machines? If so, I would love to see it.

                          TMT

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TGTool
                            No, no problem. The winch cable is easing it off with the kind assistance of gravity. Near the bottom it needs to be reared back a little to start the rollers. Once down, the winch cable loops through a pulley to a lally post and starts pulling to head it on over toward the building. Everybody was happy here. If I took pictures of the 3800 lb Milwaukee later taking the same trip I can't seem to find them.
                            One of the machines I helped move was a small radial drill...and it reached the point that your machine is at it wanted to tip forward (and over) because of its high center of gravity and the relative steepness of the ramp used. Anticipating this, I made sure that I was there as the counterweight to prevent it from doing just that.

                            Just one more reason why I am looking for a better solution.

                            TMT

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools
                              One of the machines I helped move was a small radial drill...and it reached the point that your machine is at it wanted to tip forward (and over) because of its high center of gravity and the relative steepness of the ramp used. Anticipating this, I made sure that I was there as the counterweight to prevent it from doing just that.

                              Just one more reason why I am looking for a better solution.

                              TMT
                              You're a bigger man than I am then. I wouldn't trust myself as a counterweight for a radial drill. Still that was probably better than positioning yourself as a stop block on the downside.

                              You might notice that the mill was belayed above just for that eventuality. The strap can be loosened as needed while the winch is doing the controlled lowering.
                              .
                              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

                              Comment

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