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  • Just Joined

    Hello to anyone who takes the time to read this! I have just joined this forum and received my license to post. I am a relative newbie to precision metal work but I have a long association with woodworking (sort of like soft metal but less precise).

    I am 72 years old and so I am under more pressure to advance my knowledge quickly than a younger man might be. I have progressed from using a Unimat beyond its capability to an under equipped but growing shop with a 9x20 lathe and an HF X2 mill. I have never made an engine using someone else's plans, although I make use of other peoples methods and procedures that are shared on forums like this.

    My engine stable ranges from a very crude single acting, single cylinder air engine, to a more advanced but still crude inverted V4. I have designed and created several axial (wobble plate/swash plate) engines which can be seen on the web. I am presently deeply involved in a more demanding project, a scale reproduction of a steam powered hoist (donkey) from the early 1900's.

    I do not claim any expertise, but I do have opinions and an open mind. I look forward to participating in discussions on this forum.

    Jerry
    There are thing you can do and things you can't do. I never know which is which.

  • #2
    Welcome Jerry!

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    • #3
      what a smart guy - put his location in without being asked

      Welcome aboard captain, there's lots of skilled guys here to help you come up the curve...but I suspect you might have more to teach than you're taking credit for
      .

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      • #4
        Welcome, Jerry - I'd just posted a link to your Donkey project in another thread. Very nice work. I like the way you worked around the clutch issues!

        Your gear cutting method is one that comes up often and as gear cutting is always of interest here, your experience is very topical.

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        • #5
          Welcome aboard, Jerry! Definitely post a link to your project!

          Originally posted by dp
          ...as gear cutting is always of interest here...

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          • #6
            Hi Jerry! Nice squash plate engine........... Dean
            www.neufellmachining.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Building the Donkey

              Thank you all for the welcoming messages. I am happy to post a link to my project on the HMEM website although I see from DP that he has already done so. Thank you for the mention, DP. the link is:

              http://www.homemodelenginemachinist....p?topic=9212.0

              In that topic, I mentioned that it would force me to make some gears. The method that I devised was touched on very lightly in my thread because my experience was at level zero. To my great consternation, others picked up on the method and proceeded to repeat my methods without having a full understanding of them. I accept responsibility for that since I did not go into excruciating detail of the entire process. For that reason, I hesitate to post that link as a gear making guide. It is more of a gear making adventure.

              We crawl before we walk and we reach to greater heights by standing on other peoples shoulders. In climbing on other peoples shoulders, we sometimes step on their toes. One reason that I did not go into great detail in my description is that most of the ideas that I presented had been presented so many times in the past that I did not know where to place credit. There was one step in the process that I think is entirely original and that has not been given any discussion.

              I'm not going to present it at this time because I take off for the hills of North Georgia next week with my wife and there is no web access where we are going. We'll be gone for two weeks and I suspect that there may be some discussion on my comments and I would hate to miss them.

              Meanwhile, I'll just get my feet wet around here and read some of the previous discussions.

              Jerry
              Last edited by Captain.Jerry; 06-22-2010, 04:49 PM.
              There are thing you can do and things you can't do. I never know which is which.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Jerry! Nice donkey, but you forgot the tail
                john
                John

                I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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                • #9
                  Jugs,

                  I'm working on the front end. The tail is on the other end. I'll get to it.

                  Jerry
                  There are thing you can do and things you can't do. I never know which is which.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice intresting little engine to make Jerry, Possibly you could run it on air, for letting any vistors see it operating, Instant results, Will be a fascinating little historical machine as well Welcome to the forum.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oil mac
                      Nice intresting little engine to make Jerry, Possibly you could run it on air, for letting any vistors see it operating, Instant results, Will be a fascinating little historical machine as well Welcome to the forum.
                      It will run first on air, to prove the engine construction. It may at some future point It may include a working boiler and run on steam. For demonstration purposes in a setting that has neither air pressure or steam available, I plan to operate it with a concealed electric motor, battery powered. This is not to far from historical accuracy. American Hoist provided these machines with complete steam plants or bare, for installation of user supplied air or electric motors.

                      Jerry
                      There are thing you can do and things you can't do. I never know which is which.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        welcome Jerry........

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