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Microproto DSLS 3000 fully CNCd minimill .. any dirt on this? (Taig)

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  • Microproto DSLS 3000 fully CNCd minimill .. any dirt on this? (Taig)

    I think I've located what I need to do this guitar pedal lettering issue ....

    http://www.microproto.com/

    Here's a vid of it in use .....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX6hD...layer_embedded

    I've spoke with Kurt on the phone, he seems to think it can do one pedaltop every 120 seconds or so. Wahoo! I've sent him a sample piece for him to play with a bit. Part of the nice thing is that Chandler Az (their location) is only 3 hours from Yuma, Az (where I live). Sweet.

    Turnkey $3k. Comes with Mach3.

    Any info on this or these people?

    Thanks.

    Farmdirt..
    I make messes.

  • #2
    I have heard the Taigs are nice.

    Not sure how much more you will be getting from the VAR on this but it might save you money to get it directly from Taig. I don't think Mach3 for commercial use is $840 (diff between Taig and VAR).

    The fact that you get somewhat local support might be worth it for you but you probably won't need that much more than the web can provide already for free.

    Just my thoughts.
    "Work hard. Tell everyone everything you know. Close a deal with a handshake. Have fun!"

    -- Harold "Doc" Edgerton

    Comment


    • #3
      Encoders + high spindle speed is nice.

      But not rigid or powerful enough to cut real chunks of metal.

      Mainly good for engraving and other pansy artsy stuff.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by beanbag
        Encoders + high spindle speed is nice.

        But not rigid or powerful enough to cut real chunks of metal.

        Mainly good for engraving and other pansy artsy stuff.
        Great for small stuff like Gauge 1 steam locomotives
        http://www.thms.tedatum.com/BBoard/Hume01.html
        Last edited by RB211; 06-30-2010, 10:52 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by beanbag
          Encoders + high spindle speed is nice.

          But not rigid or powerful enough to cut real chunks of metal.

          Mainly good for engraving and other pansy artsy stuff.
          Haa Haa!! Well .. some of us make our livings off of artsy fartsty stuff.





          Didn't mean to take you from your manly-man metal cutting chores to answer this thread about peepee work there Beanbag ...

          (hey .. be careful, if that thing of yours gets TOO darned big y'might step on it! Could hurt! Unless it gets rigid and powerful enough, then you just might poke someone's eye out with it instead!).

          just kidding around ... (the door was just WIDE open on that one ... )
          I make messes.

          Comment


          • #6
            Great .. thanks folks. Looks like I've found the proper tool for the proper job. No use in buying $5k worth (not including CNC gear) of 3000 pounds of used manly-man tool just to do little artsy fartsty work, right? Wow .. what a misapplication of tooling, huh? Not to mention Gov't sized innaproppriate spending!

            Now I can get a real mill to do real milling work, and have a nice precise tool for nice precise work. When I gotta hog out some serious macho-metal, I can fire up the ZX45.

            Thanks again for the reassurance folks. Fun as always.

            All the best .. Brian
            I make messes.

            Comment


            • #7
              looks like a little mill will do the job. good for you, dont beat yourself up and hurt all night. that little mill will be just the ticket for you, if you need more you will buy it.

              best wishes to you and your work..

              Comment


              • #8
                You will find that Taig is one of those "just plain nice" companies to deal with.

                Good choice.
                Gene

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hardened leadscrews with split bronze nuts, which is nice.

                  Not a full servo control like you'd get on an industrial VMC, but it does do a limited form of closed-loop feedback with steppers: it sounds like they phase-lock loop the encoder pulse-train with the step pulses. Pretty neat on a system of this size/cost:

                  Digital Sync Lock Servo (DSLS) control technology

                  DSLS control utilizes a new advanced proprietary mathematical servo control algorithm that locks the encoder feedback pulse signal stream with the command pulse signal stream. If the encoder pulse rate deviates from the commanded pulse rate the algorithm forces the two signals back into synchronization. In this way the commanded velocity and position are always followed. With the addition of an optical encoder this allows a standard open loop stepper motor drive system using step and direction software to be turned into a true closed loop servo system.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lazlo
                    Hardened leadscrews with split bronze nuts, which is nice.
                    Don't think the screws are hardened, i know mine aren't and Lester Caine the UK importer is waiting new screws to replace worm ones at a couple of universities.
                    .
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just out of curiosity, are you planning on using the new CNC mill for the entire panel or just the engraving portion? Hopefully it will be the whole panel, as it will save you all of the manual panel work except for assembly of course.

                      You will have to post your results once you get going with it all. With some careful CAD work, no one will know the difference.
                      "Work hard. Tell everyone everything you know. Close a deal with a handshake. Have fun!"

                      -- Harold "Doc" Edgerton

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you haven't already been intimidated by my overflowing manliness, I would suggest you take another look at the two Tormach mills. Both can do everything that a Microproto can, plus is better than a ZX45. One of the features you want to look at is fast stage movement speeds. You don't actually need a fast spindle because you can bolt on a dremel to the nose of the spindle and get a REALLY fast spindle speed. With the faster spindle speed and stage movement speeds, and more workspace area so you can mount multiple workpieces on the stage at once (like a John Woo movie when the guy is using two guns at once), you get a lot done a lot faster. Leaving you with more time for your other artsy pansy hobbies, like knitting or whatever.

                        PS: Mikini Mechatronics also makes a similar mill, i.e. not fully manly like a VMC, but at least not pansy.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a Taig lathe and a manual mill (bought used) and have had great service from them. The people at Taig are very nice to deal with and take care of any problems you may have right away.

                          There is a wealth of information at Nick Carters site: http://www.cartertools.com/ . He is a Taig dealer and has a list of sites including many of the CNC sites.

                          The Taig community on yahoo is very friendly and very helpful to newcomers.

                          Yes, I do artsy-fartsy stuff with my Taig, you know, like prototype optical range finders.

                          Otto

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think you will get a lot of mileage from the Taig. Now all you need is a program that will tweak your lettering in a semi random manner so it looks hand punched.

                            bob

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rowbare
                              I think you will get a lot of mileage from the Taig. Now all you need is a program that will tweak your lettering in a semi random manner so it looks hand punched.

                              bob
                              Cut2D from Vectric or the more advanced VCarve pro.

                              Both will allow you to alter text by dragging node points to shorten, lengthen or otherwise alter any entities.



                              Bottom word is just dropped in in Ariel text.
                              Top word is the same but the J has been shortened, the O has been squashed sideways and the E has the centre part tilted, literally a minutes job.

                              Next stage from this is to select a cutter, enter depth of cut and cutting speeds and post the code.
                              If it's done on the same machine that is running the Mach controller it will automatically load the code up direct.

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                              Comment

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