Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What filler for lawn mower blades?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What filler for lawn mower blades?

    When the timing belt on my lawn tractor let loose, the blades smacked together several times before stopping. I want to TIG fill the gouges and regrind. What would be better, stainless filler or regular steel filler?
    Eric
    Eric Sanders in Brighton, Michigan
    www.scope-werks.com
    www.compufoil.com

  • #2
    I'm not sure what to recommend for filler, but I just forged a knife out of a lawnmower blade last week It's 5160 -- spring steel.

    I think either filler would work, but not sure of the advantage of the stainless filler.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

    Comment


    • #3
      Welding on blades is generally not a good idea. Get some new ones.

      Comment


      • #4
        A lot of blades are heat treated 1095. Welding that may lead not be a good idea. Why do you want to fill them?

        Comment


        • #5
          Ordinary steel filler will be softer than the original metal - and will wear away quickly. Indeed, heating to weld heat will anneal the blade in the area of the heat, making it softer and less wear resistant.

          Attempting to heat, quench to full hardness and draw to temper may produce iffy results. the worst case is a blade that is almost file hard and will shatter into fragments if it hits a hard object.

          Back in my kid days, I've brazed hardfacing rod (nickel, chromium, manganese alloy) onto the cutting edge of blades and reground, but never really quantified the result.
          Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
          ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

          Comment


          • #6
            Grind them down and balance. Otherwise buy new blades. It is a major safety issue and you don't want somebody hurt.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              Definately grind them down and do not weld, Infact, don't even grind out the gouges, just sharpen them. Call it a serrated lawnmower blade if it makes you happyer, the grass does not care.

              Blades are disposables, $20~40 each Don't risk your safty with a weld weakened blade.
              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm still using my dead fathers 30 year old Monkey Wards riding mower and recently decided to replace the blades which were missing chunks from the edges. I have just about the most miserable piece of property that continuously extrudes cantaloupe sized cobbles to the surface so I'm hard on this. The old blades seemed like really tough stuff. Long story short I found some blades at wallyworld that fit which seem to be made of paperclip metal. After about a week I hit a cobble and the blade turned Ito a pretzel. Maybe they have decided to use annealed metal to prevent explosion risk. The other non-rock damaged blades edge was rounded over from cutting grass and weeds. I guess you get what you pay for. Anyone have an online source for the 1095 steel so I can make my own blades?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Harrow disks. 1095 is too brittle, use 1075 if you cannot buy decent blades. You will still have the problem of cutting without destroying the properties. Look around for some decent blades before you try to make your own. I have the same problem here. The hard clay is full of glacial till and erratics. New ones come up every year. I make sure that the blade sits 1/2 inch higher in the housing than the lip of the housing. That way the housing hits the rocks first.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Oh oh: Solution!
                    What you guys really need, is a mod for your lawnmowers

                    Stick this puppy on front:

                    Grind all the rocks down for ya before they damage the blade..

                    Hmmm. Carbide indexable lawnmower blades...

                    Or maybe just a couple of ganged 9" abrasive masonary disks up front.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Weston Bye
                      Attempting to heat, quench to full hardness and draw to temper may produce iffy results. the worst case is a blade that is almost file hard and will shatter into fragments if it hits a hard object.
                      5160 is super forgiving to heat treat, which is why it's traditional for smiths to forge their first knives out of lawnmower blades.

                      I annealed mine, forged it to shape, normalized it, reheated it to non-magnetic, quenched in oil and tempered in a toaster oven, and it came out great.
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        lawn mower

                        I purchased a lawn mower back in 2003 after the big fire in San Diego.
                        mine got toasted. The new lawn mower is a pile of junk. the blades
                        are soft so it dulls quickly or easily. it falling apart.
                        the old weed mowers would run & run , as long as it was stored out of the weather.

                        the motor was marked as 6 HP but cuts more like 2 hp.

                        It is possible the blades on some lawn mowers are induction harden at the cutting edges, so it cutting edge is hard while the rest of the blade is
                        core harden.

                        Leesr

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeah, all this new fangled stuff is crap. Whatever happened to the good old days...

                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had a cousin that bought a used bush hog. I was visiting his dad one day when he walked in white as a ghost. The previous owner of the bush hog had apparently welded the balade and he was using the machine when the weld let go. He said the blade past his head doing about 200 MPH and he came inside to lay down for a minute. It was too much for him. Get new blades. Fred

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I wasn't going to be welding the blade together in any way, just filling in a few gouges on the sharp edge. I hadn't considered that it might be heat treated however.
                              I'll just sharpen gouges like a cerrated knife and rebalance like someone mentioned before. John Deere wants $60 for a set of two blades!
                              Eric Sanders in Brighton, Michigan
                              www.scope-werks.com
                              www.compufoil.com

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X