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building up a shaft with spray weld powder

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  • #16
    Had a rotatec sprayer.Results were very good.To spray a shaft u turned down the worn part to clean the metal.Then u cut threads in the area to be sprayed(nothing special just use a threading tool & cut threads fine about .020 to .030 deep.Light torch heat shaft checking with temp stick 300 degree(use the stick beside where u are going to spray,not on area to be sprayed)when sick starts melting start spraying.Check the shaft every so often with a 550degree temp stick if stick melts u need to stop spraying & let the shaft cool a little.After part cools turn shaft down.Used to spray several times a week,never had any problems

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    • #17
      Originally posted by bborr01
      I have been thinking of starting a thread about spray welding, but it looks like I won't need to.
      Likewise -- I've been wondering if it's feasible to do thermal spray in a home shop with surplus Ebay gear, but based on the comments here, it sounds like a PITA.

      So how does buildup with thermal spray compare with just welding it up like John does? I gather it's colder and much less likely to warp, but doesn't build up nearly as much thickness?
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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      • #18
        Last week I had a shaft that the seal had worn a groove into.

        I thought about trying out the spray welder on it but found out that the price for a new one was over $1500 if I messed it up.

        So I tig welded it with stainless rod, turned it down and polished it. Turned out great. I welded the shaft a little at a time, alternating sides so it wouldn't warp. It didn't.

        Got the guys machine up and running in no time.

        Brian
        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

        THINK HARDER

        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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        • #19
          When we were just a job shop we Spray Welded for one particular customer. It wasn't profitable for us, as about 30% of the time we had to do it over, and sometimes over and over, for it to work. You could do EVERYTHING EXACTLY the way it is supposed to be done, and still flake off. We returned the equipment and either stick or tig welded shafts, and sleeved bores (Also welded some of them too). There is a bit of a trick to welding a shaft, but if done properly, it works well, and doesn't warp enough to be a problem. We routinely welded shafts from about 3/4 inch on up. Smaller ones we just made new.

          The other problem was the mess it creates. I was never a fan of using a torch on my machines, and spraying that crap around just confirmed my feelings about the practice.

          I think even the "successful" spray welders, have a fair number of do overs. You just don't see it, because most times you just drop it off, and pick it up tomorrow or the next day or later...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by oldbikerdude37
            Its very cold so warping is not an issue and not magic, its just expensive is all and getting a good bond is the whole trick.

            you spray the tool and part with brake cleaner and sure as hell dont use any cutting oil.

            Not very cold and warping is a huge issue. The heat builds up as the layers build up.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by davidh
              has anyone done this on their lathe, at home ?


              are there any words of encouragment out there. or discouragment ?
              I wouldn't do it on my lathe !!!!!!! I would rig a set of centers to turn the part on and do it outside. I Have two different spray weld setups, one is I think Roto Tec, and several different powders. The powders are not cheap.

              JL.......................

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              • #22
                Warning

                you spray the tool and part with brake cleaner and sure as hell dont use any cutting oil
                DO NOT USE fluorinated/chlorinated brake cleaner!!!! One good sniff of the fumes from the slightest trace left on a part being heated or welded can cause permanent lung damage.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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