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? mount for a Hossfeld bender ?

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  • ? mount for a Hossfeld bender ?

    I'm looking for ideas on a good way to mount a Hossfeld metal bender to the floor and be removable.
    In my last rented shop I used 6 anchor bolts, that worked great.
    But now I moved my stuff to my home shop and have limited space.

    I thinking something along the lines of a receiver hitch. Just cement a piece of square tubing into the floor and make a cover to set flush to the floor when not in use.
    I shouldn't need a cross pin as there shouldn't be any up strain.

    Has anyone use something or seen like this ??

    Hal

  • #2
    The tube should work fine but, you will have to put some "heavy spider arms" on it and bury them about in the middle of the cement. You will have alot of torque about the square tube and possibly crack the hole in the cement. Kinda like an expanding fastener gone bad.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by squirrel
      The tube should work fine but, you will have to put some "heavy spider arms" on it and bury them about in the middle of the cement. You will have alot of torque about the square tube and possibly crack the hole in the cement. Kinda like an expanding fastener gone bad.

      I think you have a good point here.

      I have seen floor mounts for benders that were twisted out of the floor...no "spider arms".

      TMT

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      • #4
        You may want to check this discussion thread...some very good ideas here.

        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...ht=bender+base


        TMT

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        • #5
          I did that type thing. I broke out about one square ft hole in the concrete and used a post hole digger and bar to dig about 2 1/2 ft hole. I welded some lumps on the outside of the tube and poured cement up to about 3" below the floor level. After that cured I poured the quikset cement that expands on cure to finish out to the old floor. You can't tell that there is a patch there and nothing has ever moved. I would probably make a small recess for a cap to be flush with the floor when the socket was not in use.Weld a good plate on the bottom end then you can insert a pipe with a trailer ball welded on the end for a post that rotates easily. I had a hoist that could be used to pick up and position heavy objects. I am on the verge of doing that again in the new shop to lift and move heavy objects on the mill.
          Byron Boucher
          Burnet, TX

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          • #6
            I'd stick to using at least four of the six mounting holes (extreme corners) on the Hossfeld base. Depending on your floor (concrete? wood?) there are plenty of options to mount a flush-to-the-floor threaded receptacle. You could also use ball-detent pins for some of the holes (for torque) to speed up changes even more. Shouldn't take more than a minute or two to detach the bender and move it aside even if you have to spin out 6 bolts.

            One of my wood lathes has an outrigger (to prevent rocking with large pieces) that attaches to 1/2-13" T-nuts embedded in the wood floor from below in the crawl space.

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            • #7
              Years ago I bought a manual tire changing machine that was mounted on a 6 ft diameter ring made of ¾ inch pipe, the tire changer sat on a 16 inch square plate of steel about ½ inch thick, it was positioned in the center of the ring with four 3/8 x 2 inch flat bars (a big X) . you simply stood on the ring and worked the tire changer. Worked great and was portable. I still have the ring and I have my HF clone bender mounted on it. There have been a few times while bending heavy stuff that I put the front tire of the pickup on the ring to help hold it. Last summer I put 4 bolts anchors in the concrete driveway next to the shop. When I need to use it, I simply roll it to the boltholes and screw in a couple of bolts and bend away.
              _____________________________________________

              I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
              Oregon Coast

              Comment


              • #8
                why not put threaded inserts in your floor, so you can just bolt it down when you need it?

                I have big floor plates, 1 foot square, set flush with the concrete in my fab shop building- when the building was being built, I welded up a grid of 1" rebar, and then welded on 1' x 1' x 3/4" steel plates, each with 4 holes drilled and tapped in them for 3/4" bolts.
                The concrete guys then placed the concrete, and troweled it flush with the plates, which are on a grid of about 6' centers. (the building is 30' x 40')

                This works great, as I can bolt anything down I want, easily. Also, I can clamp a ground clamp to a bolt in one plate, and anything metal touching any plate is then ready to weld on.

                You could install a single plate, like mine- or you could just put in threaded inserts at the 4 corners.
                Like these-
                http://www.powers.com/product_09675.html

                You just drill the concrete, and set these anchors, and you have re-usable, threaded holes in your floor.
                I would go with as big a size as you can- Powers makes em up to 5/8", but somebody else might make bigger ones- 1" would be great.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hal
                  I'm looking for ideas on a good way to mount a Hossfeld metal bender to the floor and be removable.
                  In my last rented shop I used 6 anchor bolts, that worked great.
                  But now I moved my stuff to my home shop and have limited space.

                  I thinking something along the lines of a receiver hitch. Just cement a piece of square tubing into the floor and make a cover to set flush to the floor when not in use.
                  I shouldn't need a cross pin as there shouldn't be any up strain.

                  Has anyone use something or seen like this ??

                  Hal

                  When I had mine I didn't want to put holes in the floor so I mounted it on a bench I made to hold long stock. 12 foot bars to be exact.
                  Undernieth the bench top were racks to hold bar stock.
                  On any given day there was at least 4 tons of of stock under the bench.

                  Comment

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