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  • Chinese re-cycling

    Probably 30 years ago now our old neighbor had one of the first Datsun cars imported to the states,probably 55-56' model.It was simple,well built and reliable,but one day it developed a short under the dash board.

    My uncle and I took the dash out to get at the problem and it was then that we noticed the backside of the dash was printed with color lithograph and was originally intended to be Sardine cans.

    Fast forward to the present-
    I've been buying these Chinese run flat hand truck tires,good tires and rims,but crappy bearings.I just knock the bearings out and replace them with some gokart bearings and all is well.

    I knocked out a couple today and before I tossed the bearings in the scrap bucket something caught my eye.

    The bearing cages had some color and markings-



    Red litho,parts of a bar code and Chinese characters printed on.Originally was going to be part of a tin can.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    My friend has an oil can - when he filled it, he saw it was a Chinese soup can turned inside-out.

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    • #3
      ...yet we keep buying this crap. Why? So we can continue to bitch about it?

      Jeepers-creepers post some names here so we know who not to buy from.
      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
      Plastic Operators Dot Com

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      • #4
        Anybody else out there old enough to remember the metal toy cars & trucks imported from Japan? They were stamped out of flattened beer & soda cans and you could see the lithographs on the inside of the toys. I understand they are quite the collectibles today.

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        • #5
          What bugs me is,they are made in a country where a much better sealed ball bearing can be had for $.20 each or less,yet these guys made they're own.

          Oh,water pipe races(no,really,ERW water pipe).

          Really,the tires and rims are fine,no complaints,just the crappy "bearings".

          I've found the same tires at MSC,TSC,Lowes,HF,Northern,Grizzly etc,all the same tires.So apparently the Happy Dragon Tractor,Bamboo Umbrella and Tire factory is well known

          Try to buy the same tire here and it's $60/ea. including a marginally better bearing.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wierdscience
            I've found the same tires at MSC,TSC,Lowes,HF,Northern,Grizzly etc,all the same tires.So apparently the Happy Dragon Tractor,Bamboo Umbrella and Tire factory is well known
            Take a close look at Coleman Powermate equipment and you'll see the same exact tires. I saw crates of them at the plant in NE. You can bet other "Made in the USA" equipment also uses them.

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            • #7
              The scary thing, to me at least, is that you are now meeting light trucks on the road that are rolling on Chinese tires. Shopping for tires for my Ram 3500 last year, I told the guy at the Goodyear store that the off-brand tires he was offering a deal on were probably made in China. He insisted they couldn't be, until he looked on the sidewall.

              We install a bunch of rolling element bearings in our shop. I have fought the suppliers over Chinese bearings until I'm about to give up. I refuse to put them in anything. That option is soon going to end, I'm afraid. I have also noticed the auto parts houses have begun to narrow the price between the Chinese and non-Chinese bearings. Most people don't know or care as long as they can save a buck or two.

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              • #8
                I call BS on the OP. Beer or whatever can metal is 10 thou or less, and I don't think you can find any bearing of the size that your pic shows with such flimsy material as a comb or separator.

                Stan,

                Yes, I well remember them. Smart of the Japanese to use the flattened cans for stock, rather than landfill them and buy new stock. They WERE trying to build up an economy. Who the hell cares what is on the inside of a pressed car toy?

                Maybe if they pressed them the other way and painted over the Bud lithograph we wouldn't have thought the Japanese were selling junk for so long.

                Why are people so pissed that people will use "waste" to make a product, when MOST of what we use daily IS made of what was once waste?

                Every road in our country is paved with "waste" from refining. Asphalt. That is the greatest part of the waste from oil refining, and if MacAdam, if there were such a person, had not developed mixing stone with this garbage, we would be ass deep in asphalt.

                Sulfur is another scrap product of refining. Somewhere around 3% of each and every bbl, over a gallon per bbl. Somehow, mankind finds a use for his garbage.

                Cheers,

                George

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dr Stan
                  Take a close look at Coleman Powermate equipment and you'll see the same exact tires. I saw crates of them at the plant in NE. You can bet other "Made in the USA" equipment also uses them.
                  We used to sell Herman rubber products wheels at work,made in Wisc,USA.

                  No kidding they retailed for $60/each for a 3.5x8.00 wheel.Only marginally better than the Chinese wheels that are running $13.00.Our wholesale price only left us $5/wheel profit.I have no real good idea why those little wheels cost more than a car tire,it's not like it's running 70MPH down the road.

                  Course I guess living in a country where tort payouts are only limited by a person's stupidity might have something to do with it.Some fool probably tried to run some down the road at 70MPH
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gmatov
                    I call BS on the OP. Beer or whatever can metal is 10 thou or less, and I don't think you can find any bearing of the size that your pic shows with such flimsy material as a comb or separator.
                    George,you off your meds again?

                    For scale,which there is none in my pic,my fault entirely,the balls are roughly 3/16 in diameter,the race bore .630"

                    The cage is tin can material and it's about .008".

                    For the record the Japanese made a workable product when they made the toys and the Datsun dashboard.

                    The Chinese made a useless POS when they made those bearings and they went to a lot of trouble to do it.Waste of even waste resources.

                    Those bearings will probably end up coming back as another product in a few months after our next scrap dumpster hits the yard.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dr Stan
                      Anybody else out there old enough to remember the metal toy cars & trucks imported from Japan? They were stamped out of flattened beer & soda cans and you could see the lithographs on the inside of the toys. I understand they are quite the collectibles today.

                      I have a Made in Japan wind up "friction drive" toy motorboat that my mother bought for me when I was child in Chicago. It's marked 39 cents on the box.

                      I can't get it apart since the top was crimped onto the hull. It dates from the mid 40's, I'd be willing to bet that it's recycled tin with lithographing on the inside. I had many other Japanese-made toys that I took part and they were printed inside. It's still in mint condition, too.

                      .

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wierdscience
                        Course I guess living in a country where tort payouts are only limited by a person's stupidity might have something to do with it.Some fool probably tried to run some down the road at 70MPH

                        Why else would they have the warning on the side of 8" wheelbarrow tires "Not For Highway Use"?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gnm109
                          I have a Made in Japan wind up "friction drive" toy motorboat that my mother bought for me when I was child in Chicago. It's marked 39 cents on the box.

                          I can't get it apart since the top was crimped onto the hull. It dates from the mid 40's, I'd be willing to bet that it's recycled tin with lithographing on the inside. I had many other Japanese-made toys that I took part and they were printed inside. It's still in mint condition, too.

                          .
                          Heck, the printing on the inside is a feature. It helps to prevent rust and so they last longer.
                          Paul A.

                          Make it fit.
                          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gnm109
                            I have a Made in Japan wind up "friction drive" toy motorboat that my mother bought for me when I was child in Chicago. It's marked 39 cents on the box.

                            I can't get it apart since the top was crimped onto the hull. It dates from the mid 40's, I'd be willing to bet that it's recycled tin with lithographing on the inside. I had many other Japanese-made toys that I took part and they were printed inside. It's still in mint condition, too.

                            .
                            You should try to get on Antiques Roadshow. I bet you'd be pleasantly surprised of its value especially since you have the box & its in mint condition.

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, but they're ABEC-7 bearings Darin! Hey, it's stamped on the bearing race so it must be true!

                              In the West (and Japan), quality bearing races and balls are made from 52100 (high chromium tool steel). I'd hate to think what pot metal they're using here...
                              Last edited by lazlo; 08-04-2010, 11:38 AM.
                              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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