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  • OT,Drain plug

    A neighbor called yesterday asking how do you remove a oil pan drain plug that's got the hex head all chewed up. I showed him how to use a bottle jack and chunk of wood to apply upward pressure to a pipe wrench so the jaws wouldn't slip off.Worked great.Needs a new drain plug anyway.

  • #2
    Nice trick!!

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    • #3
      That works good if the plug is on the bottom and exposed. Not so good for plugs on the side that are countersunk on cast aluminum pans. You can't even get a pipe wrench on those. I take my air cutter and cut a slot in the head of the bolt. Then use a hammer-driver with a large screwdriver bit.

      I'd like to remove the cojones of folks that use pliers, channel locks, pipe wrenches or air wrenches to remove/install a drain plug in the first place.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CCWKen
        I'd like to remove the cojones of folks that use pliers, channel locks, pipe wrenches or air wrenches to remove/install a drain plug in the first place.
        Which is why I continue to change my own oil rather than taking the car to a Jiffy Lube.

        After a lifetime of trying, I still have not achieved the perfect oil change (with no spillage on the garage floor).
        Allan Ostling

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        • #5
          Doing my own oil changes is the last thing I do myself these days. Getting too old!

          I'd like to meet the guy that put the drain plug in the front of the pan on my car!

          Jack it up to get the plug out. Let it down to drain the oil. Jack it back up the reinstall the drain plug & change the filter.

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          • #6
            I have used a Vise grip with sharp teeth. It works well when you have to replace the plug anyway.

            Have to go with both aostling and mcskipper.

            I'm too old to do oil changes but I do them anyway because I don't trust the clowns at the oil change places.
            Did one today and still hurting from only 4 times up and down.
            Last edited by KIMFAB; 08-08-2010, 02:02 AM.
            Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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            • #7
              My oil drain plug is a little valve that has a lever on it.

              I usually change my own oil, but if I am feeling too lazy, I take the car to a mechanic (not oil change place).

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              • #8
                Many years ago, I had an 86 Escort with a 14mm hex on the drain plug. The plug was soft as baby poop and even with a 6 sided socket, the hex was starting to strip. After I got it out, my solution was to weld to it a big hex nut that took an 1-1/16" wrench. From then on, you could use a crescent wrench.


                --Doozer
                DZER

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                • #9
                  I had the same problem as Doozer on a Jeep transfer case. The older ones had a huge plub with a 30 mm hex, perfect. The new ones have something like a 13 mm. hex that disappears in use. I ended up welding an allen wrench in. Then found the old style plug to replace it. I also keep a bucket of cheap chinese and other off-brand sockets which I can modify, turn down or weld up whenever I need a fairly sturdy square socket on a tool or a drain plug. In places where it doesn't matter whether it protrudes, this can be very handy. Just weld a socket onto the face of the plug, and you'll never chew it up again.

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                  • #10
                    " Just weld a socket onto the face of the plug, and you'll never chew it up again. "


                    Pure Genius!!!
                    Me likes!

                    --D
                    DZER

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KIMFAB
                      Did one today and still hurting from only 4 times up and down.
                      I just drive the Forester up onto a pair of plastic ramps, bought at WalMart. I trust these for the purpose of merely feeling under the engine for the drain plug. If the slight inclination of the vehicle causes imperfect drainage, I am not aware of it.
                      Allan Ostling

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                      • #12
                        You still have to get under to drain and remove the filter and then put the plug back with new filter.

                        I have ramps too but I seem to always have to get out and readjust them. It's easier on my back to drag the floor jack out and it also gives a nice tilt to the van that helps drainage.
                        Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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                        • #13
                          Here's another little tip that I started using years ago when changing large heavy and hot oil filters on large trucks and heavy equipment.

                          Some of these filters hold over a gallon of oil and when they are hot they are a b*tch to change because as soon as you start to unscrew them you've got hot oil running all over the engine, frame rails and suspension, and of course down your arm all the way to your armpits. All the while trying your darnest to not fumble it and end up wearing the whole mess in your face!

                          Simply use an awl or ice pick to puncture the filter in a spot where you can cleanly drain the filter into a container. Also don't forget to punch a hole into the side of the filter near the top in order to allow air to enter the filter so that it can drain faster . I use this technique on everything now as it's so much easier and cleaner to unscrew a filter that is empty.
                          Last edited by Willy; 08-08-2010, 05:32 PM.
                          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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                          • #14
                            Many years ago I had a Vauxhall Viva with a chewed-up oil plug in it's tin sump. No spanner was going to fit it and it was also chewed to a taper so that stillsons wouldn't even grip. I had no welder at the time but I did have a small electric concrete breaker in my works van with a new chisel. Hit the plug with that for a few seconds and it screwed straight off.
                            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                            Monarch 10EE 1942

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Willy
                              Simply use an awl or ice pick to puncture the filter in a spot where you can cleanly drain the filter into a container.
                              I'm going to try this. The perfect oil change may finally be in my grasp.
                              Allan Ostling

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