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I'm sure there was some machining involved in the making of this

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  • Circlip
    replied
    In UK back in the late 50s/early 60s the one I had was probably the first use of injection molded Nylon for a "Toy". After finding soaking your mates with the "Jet" efflux got boring (for both parties) after a while, its eventual use was as a retrieval vehicle when the muddle boat ran out of fuel on the local lake.

    Long length of fine string fastened to the nozzle, zig zag laid on lake side (Concrete) in preparation, roket filled but not pressurised and when the boat engine cut, it was "Thunderbirds are go" over the boat and draw back.

    Double the fun and the rocket fuel was free.

    Regards Ian

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by krutch
    I had a plastic rocket when I was a kid that you would fill with water and fix to a pump that worked like that. IIRC, the 'rocket' was about 8" tall and it would rise some height. Nothing like that or I'd have gotten in a lot more trouble than I did. It was amazing it lasted as long as it did, being plastic, but I had a good time with it. Can't remember what company made it. It worked pretty good as a gun, too. Wonder I didn't hurt someone with it.

    yep, had a set like it. Rockets were blue on lower half, and red on top part, clear plastic. Back in the 1950's or very early 1960's. One was a 2 stager.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Back in the late 50s I had one like that, krutch. Mine was a neat little toy that had three rockets that you lined up in a row on a strip launchpad and you pulled a string to slide the locking mechanism aside to launch them, either one at a time or if you pulled the string fast, almost simultaneously. I had a lot of fun with that, until a neighbor girl came over and broke it! I quickly figured out that if I turned it on it's side, I could use it to shoot at my older sisters. Trouble was, I couldn't refill fast enough to keep them at bay after the first volley! I've seen very similar ones for sale recently but only the single rocket ones.

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  • krutch
    replied
    I had a plastic rocket when I was a kid that you would fill with water and fix to a pump that worked like that. IIRC, the 'rocket' was about 8" tall and it would rise some height. Nothing like that or I'd have gotten in a lot more trouble than I did. It was amazing it lasted as long as it did, being plastic, but I had a good time with it. Can't remember what company made it. It worked pretty good as a gun, too. Wonder I didn't hurt someone with it.

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  • Duffy
    replied
    Somewhere back in the early issues of Projects in Metal, (I think,) are the plans for the launching mechanism for these "soda bottle" rockets. There was no mention of how much they weighed at their apogee, and I assumed that it was just an empty plastic bottle falling back. Evidently Brian, you found that the bottle still had a fair bit of water in it!

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I made one of those using a plastic 2 litre coke bottle. Its amazing how high they will fly on 100 psi of air. Its even more amazing, the size of dent they will put in the hood of a brand new toyota when they fall from 150 feet!!!

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  • tumutbound
    replied
    Makes ya proud to be an Orstralian!

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  • Deja Vu
    replied
    http://www.aircommandrockets.com/

    building details: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9Gyg...layer_embedded#!
    Last edited by Deja Vu; 08-14-2010, 07:34 AM.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Wow what an obsession --- makes me feel like rounding up about 5 plastic deep rock jugs and throwing one 40 mm nozzle on the bottom with about 175psi

    gotta hand it to the guy, lots of trail and error to create that beast.

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  • Brett Hurt
    replied
    cool

    That was very nice Brett

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  • I'm sure there was some machining involved in the making of this

    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=30e_1281684001
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