Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

We need to design a better grease gun!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • We need to design a better grease gun!

    With all the knowledge available on this forum I bet you all could design a better grease gun. I hate grease guns. I have at least 10 different styles and designs of grease guns. Expensive, cheap, air operated with compressed air, built in air pump as well as the standard spring type to push the grease to the pump. I have never ever put in a grease cartridge and pumped it all out with out having to fiddle with the gun. Unscrew the end and do something to it.

    I think they need to have a better plunger. Mine all have just some rubber/plastic piston that always seems to get twisted and then it won't push the grease up to the pump. Why wouldn't some arrangement similar to a hydraulic piston work? It would be heavier and longer but I think something along those lines would be a big improvement.

    Anyone else ever experience these problems with grease guns? I want to build the ultimate grease gun. Machined to perfection!
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Black Forest
    I think they need to have a better plunger. Mine all have just some rubber/plastic piston that always seems to get twisted and then it won't push the grease up to the pump. Why wouldn't some arrangement similar to a hydraulic piston work? It would be heavier and longer but I think something along those lines would be a big improvement.

    Anyone else ever experience these problems with grease guns? I want to build the ultimate grease gun. Machined to perfection!
    If you've got air at the handle for a powered version, why not eliminate
    the spring (below the cartrigde) and make a aluminum piston, powered
    with air on the backside, get rid of that narly spring, and supply constant
    force all the way to the end of the cartridge.

    One of the problems I see, in making a better fitting plunger is the fact that
    the plunger interfaces with a disposable (low tolerance) cardboard
    tube. The caulking industry I see, has mostly changed over to nice plastic
    tubes, which if done by the grease industry, would go a long way
    to help this problem (which will probably never happen)

    Comment


    • #3
      I think your problem stems from the cartridge. What with mfg.
      tolleances and different mfgrs. etc. A properly made gun will undoubtly
      work if everything is is just so. I haven't used the old bulk filled ones
      but wonder if that method would be better. Anyone that has????
      ...lew...

      Comment


      • #4
        all my grease cartridges are plastic not cardboard. I wouldn't even mind emptying the cartridge into a gun that doesn't use cartridges if I could find one.

        I don't always have compressed air available when I have to grease some machines. So it would be better to have a self contained gun.
        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

        Comment


        • #5
          I have several grease guns and the one I use now is a cartridge type but I don't use the cartridge. I plunge the open end of the tube into the grease bucket and pull the handle up and lock it in place in the notch at the end of the tube. Then I fill the remaining open end with grease and screw the head on the tube.

          Be very careful you don't knock the plunger out of the notch before you screw the end on, it makes a big mess if you do.

          The biggest problem with grease guns is air in the grease. Even the ones that sit in top a barrel will get air and quit pumping grease.

          Keep working on a design and let us know how it goes.
          It's only ink and paper

          Comment


          • #6
            I got one of these,costs a good bit,but it's easy to use,one handed no less and it cleans the tube,only ever need a paper shop towel to cleanup after a tube change.

            http://www.lincolnindustrial.com/asp...seguns/12v.asp
            I just need one more tool,just one!

            Comment


            • #7
              I never have any trouble with my grease gun. I always take it with me whenever I have my car serviced.


              No good deed goes unpunished.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am 62 years old, and have been a gear head all my life. You know, in all that time, I don't think I have ever picked one off the rack to use, that hasn't required tinkering with to use.

                I did, however work for a shop, that had a rig that clamped onto a 5 pound can of grease, that had a spring loaded plunger, that you forced down, (required quite a push) and this fed a remote 'gun' that actually pressurized the grease. I can't remember the manufacturer, but it came with a large assortment of fittings, needle point, long 90 degree adapters, ect. It actually worked pretty well.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And I thought I was the only one!

                  The problem for me is almost always air at the pump inlet.
                  I drilled and tapped a 4-40 at the input side if the pump if I need it let the air out.

                  How about making a two section pump, one for the grease and one for air to move the piston. Make a pop-off valve for the air side to prevent over pressure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's been about 45 years since I first started servicing equipment on a serious basis and I too thought...there's gotta be a better way!
                    Well 45 years have come and gone and there hasn't been a whole helluva lot of new developments in the technology of greasing equipment.

                    But after having gone through literally thousands of tubes of grease during the ensuing years I have found what I think are some techniques that have made my days easier.

                    Fist off I think most will agree that air pockets are probably the biggest source of frustration. When I service some of the trucks or equipment that I operate I typically go through 3-6 tubes of grease per session so minimizing those air pockets is a priority.
                    When the gun runs out of grease, stop pumping immediately. Unscrew the head without pulling the plunger up, after the head is off pull the plunger up and remove the spent tube. Insert the new tube of grease, screw the head on 1-1 1/2 turns max, release the plunger give it a twist so that it is solid, apply as much pressure to the plunger as possible, (I usually hold it against my body while holding onto the grease gun with both hands and pulling it towards me) then drop the plunger into the cartridge and screw the gun head on the rest of the way.

                    This procedure while sounding rather convoluted is intended to minimize and release air pockets.
                    However another source of air pockets are those from the facility that packages the lubricant. I have found some suppliers of grease that have absolutely zero air pocket inclusions and yet other suppliers have products which are consistently riddled with air inclusions and of course frustration.

                    Also my weapon of choice is a nice Lincoln gun with a quality 36" high pressure hose between it and the coupler. The 36'" hose allows me to access grease fittings more easily as I can leave the gun in a handy spot rather than trying to hold it, the coupler, and pumping at the same time. I find the long hose gives more freedom of movement especially to some of those almost inaccessible fittings that are found all to often.

                    I have tried air and electric operated guns and don't much care for either as they are not only cumbersome but also lack the pressure capabilities of a good lever operated gun. Perhaps they work in applications where one can just walk by and grease fittings that are easily accessed, I haven't been blessed with that kind of luck.

                    Lastly, remember that while greasing maybe a pain at times, it's still a lot easier and cheaper than replacing pins, bushings, bearing, u-joints, etc., etc.
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A good Lincoln will work if you do your part. Lincoln also makes some cheapies that don't work very good. The good ones cost significantly more than the cheapies. One of my suppliers had the cheapies on sale and I bought several. They work OK for greasing wheel bearings on boat trailers. I had one of the Air type systems that set on about a 30 gallon drum. I put a flex hose on it and it worked very well. It should it was expensive. The old bulk guns that filled from a five gallon can could be converted to cartridges by reversing the plunger diaphram. In the old days the grease cans had a follower plate with a center hole a little larger than the gun. You stuck the gun into the grease thru that hole and pulled the plunger filling the gun. There was allways some grease to wipe up after filling but that system worked real good. The last couple of buckets of grease that I have bought don't have the follower plate. Sure is nice to be retired and not have to start the day greasing the drilling rig. Now if I could figure some way out of having to sweep the swarf out of the shop that would be even nicer.
                      Byron Boucher
                      Burnet, TX

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My grease gun of choice is the same as saltmine's and I should have bought one it the late fifty's when they were cheap. Of course when I read the subject of this thread the first thing I thought of was the grease gun of WW II and a mighty fine grease gun it is. I was wondering how in the world you could improve the grease gun.
                        It's only ink and paper

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Grease guns- I always have thought there should be a better way. One I have now is laying on newspaper, slowly oozing its slickness all over itself and the newspaper.

                          I had an idea for a better gun, but first of all, how much pressure is required from a grease gun? Likely to be more than could be supplied by a typical shop air system I suppose- otherwise we could have all manner of air pressurized holding tanks and dispensing guns. I wouldn't mind having the gun connected to the tank via a hose, as long as the whole thing is easily portable and quick to wrap up and store.

                          I would go for a decent sized tank, maybe 20 lbs or so, and make it non tippable. Give it a vacuum port, or figure out a way to spin it to de-air the contents.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by darryl
                            Grease guns- I always have thought there should be a better way. One I have now is laying on newspaper, slowly oozing its slickness all over itself and the newspaper.

                            I had an idea for a better gun, but first of all, how much pressure is required from a grease gun? Likely to be more than could be supplied by a typical shop air system I suppose- otherwise we could have all manner of air pressurized holding tanks and dispensing guns. I wouldn't mind having the gun connected to the tank via a hose, as long as the whole thing is easily portable and quick to wrap up and store.

                            I would go for a decent sized tank, maybe 20 lbs or so, and make it non tippable. Give it a vacuum port, or figure out a way to spin it to de-air the contents.

                            I welded up the grease piping for a vehicle maintenance building for the military, it was all sched 80 seamless pipe and socket weld fittings. The officer in charge wanted it hydro-tested at 5000 psi, ... I pointed out the fittings were good for 3000 psi, he allowed us to test at that pressure. I'm not sure how indicative this is of the pressures needed, but clearly they get pretty high.

                            rollin'

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A couple years ago I got an Alemite grease gun from mcmaster, they don't seem to be selling it at the moment- but its been remarkably free of air pocket issues. It has a vent which does a nice job of clearing most of the air after putting in a new tube. The pump hasn't had any trouble with air-locking like my el-cheapo 3oz gun does. Haven't had to mess around with adjusting the tip either.

                              Greg

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X