Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

import lathe disappointment (do they use their own?)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • import lathe disappointment (do they use their own?)

    I was turning down a 9.5" square base plate as an adapter between my 4" chuck to a 10" rotary table, down to 6.5" today on a 10x22 import lathe. I took 200 passes at 5 thou , then 50 at 10 thou, over a distance of 5/8". The material was probably hardened judging by the chips (red, then blue), and the sound [ if it wasn't, at least it was some hard steel ]. I used the compound entirely because the piece was too big for power-feed.

    The compound was poorly centered and had the best adjustment I could do had a tight spot and a loose spot, or no tight spot and a very loose spot. My index knuckle is cut and blistered from rubbing on the sharp edges of the dial, and slippage from the tight spot. The lathe was on low speed (using the timing belt), and the 1hp motor would nearly grind to a halt as the cutter was plunged into the material.

    If I had that sharp and brown lathe I'm looking at buying, I could do it in 3 passes, and one finish pass [it is also a 10x20].
    Do you think they use their own quality of tools to make the import hobby machine tools? That would be some tragedy ...

  • #2



    Fat-girl angle shot on the import lathe. I made a post about how Syil machine tool does this to their tools, on cnczone, which got removed.
    Last edited by Elninio; 08-16-2010, 11:42 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      If the metal was as hard as you said, it would not have been easier on any other lathe. Cutting a square plate to round is always a hard job and if the metal is hardened it is very hard to do.

      If you had clearance to use the compound you should have used the carriage to hand feed it. Using the compound is not the best way to do what you did.
      It's only ink and paper

      Comment


      • #4
        Would you ever reasonably compare an import 10x to a Brown and Sharp?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Tony Ennis
          Would you ever reasonably compare an import 10x to a Brown and Sharp?
          that would be like comparing a Yugo with a MB or BMW.

          Comment


          • #6
            "import" is meaningless.

            yep, an $800 chinese 10x20 is a lot lower in quality than a browne and sharpe.

            but a browne and sharpe is a lot lower in quality than a $40,000 Schaublin "import" of the same size.

            You get exactly what you pay for.
            If the Browne and Sharpes were still made today, judging from current prices for HLVH's and 10EE's, they would be in the range of $50,000.
            Its kinda a no brainer that a $50,000 machine will do a better job than a $1000 machine, no matter where they are made.


            And no, they dont use 10x20 hobby grade lathes in factories in China- they buy a LOT of very good machines from Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Germany, and, yes, the USA- the chinese were buying over 100 Haas machines a month a couple years ago, probably less now. But the chinese are not dumb- when the job requires a big, quality machine, they buy em.

            Comment


            • #7
              "Fat-girl angle shot on the import lathe. I made a post about how Syil machine tool does this to their tools, on cnczone, which got removed."

              Will someone please explain what this means?
              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not talking about build quality or precision. Asian import lathes took old proven designs and weakened them, as long as they ~look~ the same, and that's the 'scam' they're running. They could have reinforced this lathe with extra iron, and I'd be paying probably only $500 more.

                Comment


                • #9
                  ???

                  Was the square material "flame cut" (ie with an O/A "gas-axe")?

                  If it was it sure would have been hard in the "axe-cut" zone.

                  Just what material was it?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm not sure, but it was used as a baseplate for a vice (they vice didn't have a key-hole for alignment, so they mounted it on this plate). I broke a 1/8th endmill cutting it (gently of course), and the carbide that was brazed into the holder of a face mill was removed during a 200 thou deep cut when I was begining to round the corners while it was mounted on the rotary table. That's when I decided I could just put it in the lathe (after cutting a bit of the corners on the bench grinder). The plate looks to be cut by a plasma torch.

                    Comment


                    • #11


                      This is the source of the plate. The plate has positioning pins in it as well, so it's original purpose was probably not for this vice (it doesn't use the pins). Notice the pin in the bottom of the right-ward vice jaw (it is not touching the vice at all).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Buy a Haas!
                        I have been hard turning (HRC 50) on mine and the parts came out smoother than the ground original.


                        Nick

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Erm, the lathe Elninio pictured is not a Brown & Sharp but an (imported) UK Smart & Brown 1024 — see here:

                          http://www.lathes.co.uk/smartbrown/page6.html

                          Joe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Flame cut generaly means harder then nails around the area thats cut. Clean the cut up and grind some metal away (being carful not to overheat the metal) to make it MUCH easyer to machine (in the future...)
                            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Elninio
                              I'm not talking about build quality or precision. Asian import lathes took old proven designs and weakened them, as long as they ~look~ the same, and that's the 'scam' they're running. They could have reinforced this lathe with extra iron, and I'd be paying probably only $500 more.
                              It's not a scam... sure, they may be selling cheapened down copies of 'western built' machines, but they're selling them for pennies on the dollar. How is that a scam?

                              "Here, buy this lathe from me, it's half as good as a South Bend, but it costs one tenth as much!"

                              Pretty straightforward, I think. They're selling to a lower end market and building accordingly. For most hobbiests that's just fine. I'm tickled pink with my chi com 12x36 that I bought for $2200 to stick in my garage and run three maybe four hours a week. If I were trying to run a business with that machine it would suck hard eggs, but that's not the target audience for the machine.

                              It just is what it is.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X