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Holy Metal spinning Batman!

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  • Holy Metal spinning Batman!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsCFz...eature=related

    Notice all the distractions on the wall behind the Lathe

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soCh9...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THsFM...eature=related
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    LOL I was looking at a calender at the shop today 2006 and she doint look a day older.

    From Rockmount Research Alloys, Inc.
    Last edited by oldbikerdude37; 08-18-2010, 11:50 PM.

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    • #3
      I have similar 'distractions' on the wall behind my lathe.
      By the way... What was the finished product?
      They never showed the end result of all that spinning.

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      • #4
        The guy is sure confident in what he is doing and he still has all his fingers. I still wonder how many times the thing has grabbed him and slung him into next week.
        _____________________________________________

        I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
        Oregon Coast

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        • #5
          Nothing like putting on the loosest fitting clothes you can find, a pair of gloves and then lean on the spinning part while hand sanding it.
          Or taking a big old wood lathe style chisel and slicing off a nice chip with no eye protection, and then check for burrs with a bare hand while the part is still at speed.

          These could be training films on what not to do while at work.

          Steve

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          • #6
            I was thinking Cat in a clothes dryer

            Can't find a picture of the finished product,also couldn't find the video of the 1st step,oh well still neat.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              I have one of those spheres on my Tesla Coil. It makes 12 foot long sparks. My sphere is 3 ft diameter. Setting in the back yard I can make a 27 foot circle of lightning sparks and arcs. It is pretty amazing.

              http://home.earthlink.net/~gary350/tc10-4.jpg

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              • #8
                Interesting to see metal appearing so pliable. The domes in the background
                are further examples of the art.

                No doubt that method gives the principal more versatility and reduces
                fixturing/set up. But I felt squeamish thinking about the possibiilties and
                consequences.

                Edit: oops - domes formed in subsequent links.

                .

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                • #9
                  Relatively simple form for a metal spinner, the forming tools are under the C/L of the machine and the metal is rotating away from the tool so it can't "Grab" in the conventional sense and the forming tools are polishers rather than cutters, the exception being the one used to trim the stretched edge.The one "Sanding" it is using a "Scotchbrite" polishing pad which is an open cell plastic scrubbing pad impregnated with a polishing compound and although the object in question is Aluminininium, other metals can be spun.

                  Don't suppose many on the Forum would feel happy about swinging around on high steelwork, the experts make it look easy, those of us that watch see all the potential hazards. Surfice to say, it's a much safer worksho than the ones it is being replaced with in "Warmer" climbs.

                  Still a few artisans left in the good ole U of K.

                  Regards Ian.
                  You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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