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Keeping cool in the shop..what works and what doesn't

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  • #16
    I only use it a few days a year. I don't keep the temp out there down in the summer like I keep it up in the winter. My machines and gear have to suffer in 85+ heat (sometimes it gets hotter, but it's insulated pretty good), but part of that is from the dehumidifier running all the time.

    I'd really like to find a way to make the dehumidifier's heat vent outside (like an AC does), but I haven't looked into it yet.

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    • #17
      Big honkin azz York at work here.........reason for post however is squirrel cages.Can't seem to pass them up either,whether its on the "curb" or in a bud's HVAC trash.Anyhow,mine is part of our overall clean air system.Fabbed up a sweet inlet plenum to accept 24x24 $$3M filters..........It was on a rollaround for a cpl years.Heck,even used it as part of a fold-spray booth(see below).Nowadays its hung w/dogchain from ceiling and is switched from a convenient location.When dust collector isn't sucking or whatever,its mighty handy to hit the squirell switch.The filtered exhaust blows on assembly area.




      Note:Hillbilly squirell cage portable paintbooth.Took 3 discarded,albiet matching of course,doors.Think,one centered and the others hinged on this cnt dr so the whole thing folds up.Squirell cage was on a rollaround that matched height of hole cut in center door.Assembled,a pc of E conduit was screwed as spreader bar on fr/top leading edge of drs,this serves for hanging parts.Clear plastic and a flourecent light makes top.The mtr on blower is out of airstream for fume reasons.How do those Brits say it....Works a treat?BW

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      • #18
        AC is the only way!

        Originally posted by Jim Shaper
        I'd really like to find a way to make the dehumidifier's heat vent outside (like an AC does), but I haven't looked into it yet.
        I use one of those portable air conditioners that blows the hot air through a hose run out the window. Yesterday was 85, but the humidity made it feel like 105. My puny little 6000 BTU AC kept the shop (20x24) around 77 with 45% humidity. I run the condensate drain into my shop sink, and there was a continuous stream running from it. It uses a similar amount of electricity as a mid sized dehumidifier, but gets the heat out of the room. Seems to remove just as much moisture from the air too.

        I spend a lot of time out there, and with the equipment I have, consider AC a necessity. It only takes a tiny bit of rust on a toolholder taper, and I can run into a stuck tool situation on my VMC spindle. Collets, lathe chucks, welding table, tooling, are all reasons to keep it dry. I HATE rust, and being comfortable is a bonus!

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        • #19
          I have a 18K BTU A/c in the end wall of my shop. You know how hot it is by my location. My largest bill so far was $46. It runs everyday..My shop is about 600 sq ft..the 32 X 32 metal roof I installed over my shop and apron area helps greatly..

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          • #20
            Originally posted by BWS
            Note:Hillbilly squirell cage portable paintbooth.Took 3 discarded,albiet matching of course,doors.Think,one centered and the others hinged on this cnt dr so the whole thing folds up.Squirell cage was on a rollaround that matched height of hole cut in center door.Assembled,a pc of E conduit was screwed as spreader bar on fr/top leading edge of drs,this serves for hanging parts.Clear plastic and a flourecent light makes top.The mtr on blower is out of airstream for fume reasons.How do those Brits say it....Works a treat?BW
            Good idea.

            TMT

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Prototyper
              I use one of those portable air conditioners that blows the hot air through a hose run out the window. Yesterday was 85, but the humidity made it feel like 105. My puny little 6000 BTU AC kept the shop (20x24) around 77 with 45% humidity. I run the condensate drain into my shop sink, and there was a continuous stream running from it. It uses a similar amount of electricity as a mid sized dehumidifier, but gets the heat out of the room. Seems to remove just as much moisture from the air too.

              I spend a lot of time out there, and with the equipment I have, consider AC a necessity. It only takes a tiny bit of rust on a toolholder taper, and I can run into a stuck tool situation on my VMC spindle. Collets, lathe chucks, welding table, tooling, are all reasons to keep it dry. I HATE rust, and being comfortable is a bonus!

              What brand is your portable air conditioner?

              Any problems with it?

              TMT

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools
                Having sweat run down your back tends to distract from the fun of working in the shop.
                Did you read this on someones blog? Yahoo news?

                I wasn't aware that you actually work in a shop.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by snowman
                  Did you read this on someones blog? Yahoo news?

                  I wasn't aware that you actually work in a shop.

                  LOL...have you paid your dues yet? ;<)

                  TMT

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                  • #24
                    The machine shop used to be an apartment when we were building our house. 24K BTU in 15x40 (600 sq ft) set at 84 when not occupied and 80 when working in the shop. also use a dehumidifier. It adds heat, but gets the moisture out. No rust! Bill for late July thru late Aug was $75. area was 10 degrees above normal for the past couple of months. Highest bill in several years.
                    Heated by propane in the winter, but only to 55 degrees.
                    I love being able to work comfortably in the shop. I make less mistakes when comfortable.
                    John Burchett
                    in Byng OK

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                    • #25
                      +1 for the 18000BTU AC set in the South wall. It has been close to 100 degrees here with similar humidity. AC is a must here on the Texas Gulf Coast. It makes life so much more pleasant.

                      Randy
                      Do yourself a favor and see if your TV carrier has America One News Network (AONN). 208 on Uverse. It is good old fashion news, unlike the networks, with no hype, bias or other BS.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Prototyper
                        I use one of those portable air conditioners that blows the hot air through a hose run out the window. Yesterday was 85, but the humidity made it feel like 105. My puny little 6000 BTU AC kept the shop (20x24) around 77 with 45% humidity. I run the condensate drain into my shop sink, and there was a continuous stream running from it. It uses a similar amount of electricity as a mid sized dehumidifier, but gets the heat out of the room. Seems to remove just as much moisture from the air too.

                        I spend a lot of time out there, and with the equipment I have, consider AC a necessity. It only takes a tiny bit of rust on a toolholder taper, and I can run into a stuck tool situation on my VMC spindle. Collets, lathe chucks, welding table, tooling, are all reasons to keep it dry. I HATE rust, and being comfortable is a bonus!
                        My wall ac unit has a dehumidify mode, but I question it's efficiency.

                        75 dollars a month for electricity isn't bad at all. Our local power plant switched from coal to NG a couple years back and stuck us with the fuel cost surcharge even though it saves them millions in labor. We're at $200, but 60 of that is the surcharge. We keep the house at 74 all the time, I only cool the shop down when I'm going to be out there for an extended period. I've got a whole house fan installed out there, so I can suck out the hot air so long as it's better outside.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by KIMFAB
                          No choices here.
                          We had a few 120 degree days this summer, it has cooled down to the low 110 area now so central air in both shops is mandatory.

                          I will only turn it on in the shop I am using tho.
                          Ditto the above, almost exactly.
                          Pahrump, NV, 8 miles from the edge of Death Valley, 50 miles from Furnace Creek CA(Highest reported air temp in USA, 136° F).

                          Guy who built my home (3,800 Sq Ft) and the 2,700 Sq Ft, 2 story shop next to it (built it himself, for himself, and did a superb job of it) was cautious.
                          He didn't want any equipment failures resulting in uncomfortable living conditions I think.
                          Shop has two 5 ton central HVAC units, one handles it, second is a backup, and then he installed a large Swamp Cooler that can have its output directed to just the part of the shop you are in. I don't use that as much, generally just for the second floor where there are no machine tools to rust.
                          There are also a couple of big wall fans on each wall of the shop, and I have lots of floor fans as well. Keeps it very comfortable if I don't open the big roll up doors during the day.

                          House is similarly equipped.

                          Electricity here is outrageously expensive, so I try to keep things shut up and shuttered to keep the temps down inside. Fortunately he also built both buildings with 2x12 walls and heavily insulated the walls, attic and the undersides of the roof as well. And the house has a 15 Ft wide porch all the way around it.

                          We added sun cloth sun shades to the outer edge of the porch, keeps the last little bit of sun from hitting the exterior house walls directly in the summer. That was good for about a $50 reduction in the summer cooling/electrical bill.

                          Still the average electrical bill for both buildings runs right around $400 a month during June, July, August and about half of September. Rest of the year runs $250 a month. Place is all electric unfortunately, if we had gas heat it would be a bit cheaper in the winter.

                          Have been thinking of a combination of solar panels, wind generator and battery backup to help ease the costs. This is our retirement home, so spreading the cost over the 30+years we expect to be here, could help out a bit. We get more than enough wind to make the wind turbines effective, and the local electrical coop is going to be offering zero interest loans (so they say!) to help get both of these systems installed here in the valley in residences.
                          Steve
                          NRA Life Member

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