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  • Forklift forks

    Do any of you folks know what kind of steel is used to make forklift forks?
    The reason I ask is that I just ordered a new set of forks that are a foot longer and will have two old forks to use for wharever.

    Evan: I made the phone calls to the actual factory in Guelph Ontario and was reassured that they are indeed made in Guelph or Lima Ohio. Everything is NOT made in China as some people think!

  • #2
    Originally posted by klemchuk
    I made the phone calls to the actual factory in Guelph Ontario and was reassured that they are indeed made in Guelph or Lima Ohio. Everything is NOT made in China as some people think!
    That way they can slap a ''made in the USA'' sticker on the import fork lift.

    Not sure what steel is used but the tapered tips make nice wedges that come in handy on all sorts of projects.


    Steve

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    • #3
      They are made of different types of steel. Sometimes HSLA A572-50 (high strenght low alloyed) steel, 1045-1060 heat treated material, T1 heat treated steel and others. May or may not be weldable. Sorry, may only be good for counterweigh or similar.

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      • #4
        Good forklift tines are made from 4140 and 4340 -- great material.

        The only reason I know is I've been dumpster diving for anvil materials, and several of the local blacksmiths tell me forklift tines make great anvils
        Last edited by lazlo; 08-25-2010, 11:00 PM.
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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        • #5
          Ditto Lazlo. Chrome Moly

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          • #6
            Used forks here are worth $100/fork for ITA mount and $150-300/fork if they are rod mount depending on size.

            Or you could cut them up
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wierdscience
              Used forks here are worth $100/fork for ITA mount and $150-300/fork if they are rod mount depending on size.

              Or you could cut them up
              Yah, I was looking for one that was crashed or worn out, so I could plasma or flame-cut a 1 foot section off it.
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by doctor demo
                That way they can slap a ''made in the USA'' sticker on the import fork lift.

                Not sure what steel is used but the tapered tips make nice wedges that come in handy on all sorts of projects.


                Steve
                Could you expand on how you use the tips for wedges?

                I am always looking for another project to make.

                Thanks

                TMT

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lazlo
                  Yah, I was looking for one that was crashed or worn out, so I could plasma or flame-cut a 1 foot section off it.
                  That may be hard to do.

                  Many yards now will not sell any used fork, complete or partial, because of liability.

                  TMT

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Too_Many_Tools
                    Many yards now will not sell any used fork, complete or partial, because of liability.
                    Bummer. They apparently work well as a poor-man's anvil:

                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      Home made Anvils

                      That was interesting. I recently saw a small anvil someone sculpted from a piece of Rail Road Rail. It was small but reflected some real talent. Would a larger piece of rail upside down work like the fork lift tine? I posted this a while back but I mounted my anvil on a piece of 12 3/4" well casing and filled it with concrete. It is heavy and stable but it is easy to roll/walk it around.
                      Byron Boucher
                      Burnet, TX

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marquejohn
                        Steel forklift forks are the answer to all problems. I have a couple of them but am not sure though whether the steel used is HSLA A572-50 or not. I particularly don’t care if forks are made in China or not, as long as they are good quality and durable!
                        Nice spamming, please get your things and get out.
                        Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                        • #13
                          What a dick-wad.
                          He's selling forklift forks and he doesn't have a clue what they're made of!
                          Yeah give me a dozen of those.
                          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                          Location: British Columbia

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                          • #14
                            I use a couple of pieces about a foot long milled and surface ground parallel and equal thickness for work supports on my hydraulic press. I know they aren't going to bend or break.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                              Nice spamming, please get your things and get out.
                              huh? did I miss something? this thread is three years old!
                              Last edited by lakeside53; 09-27-2013, 01:14 PM.

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