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HELP! - bandsaw cutting too slow

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  • HELP! - bandsaw cutting too slow

    I posted earlier about breaking the Horror Freight bandsaw blade.
    But maybe I need a little help with my bandsaw's cutting force.
    The original plastic Chinese (lightweight) motor died on me, so I replaced it with a beefy 20Lb. motor.
    The heavier motor now acts as a counterbalance.
    It's a little 4X6 Enco bandsaw, with a fixed spring in the back for the cutting downforce tension.
    However, there is no way to adjust the tension. The spring is bolted at both ends to the saw.
    The new heavier motor causes the blade to BARELY drop... rreeeaaallll slow.
    So I added some weight to speed-up the cut, and the blade broke after 18 parts.
    HHMMM ????
    Is this a trial & error process?
    Or is there someway to gage the correct downforce?
    Anyone want to send me some free bandsaw blades to experiment with?

  • #2
    You guys call me names when ever I say it, but those little saws are junk.

    I know I have 1 and I've gone through all of the same misery. How ever I also have a Johnson 7 x 14 and a Grob 36

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    • #3
      I've had a little 4"X6" since 1975. It is a Dayton. I don't know if it is a rebadged import,but it has always worked very well. I even have accurately cut 6" and larger rounds by having a good blade(just 1/2" carbon) on it,and rotating the bar of steel.

      I think there is a learning curve with these saws. At first I couldn't get the saw to work well,but soon learned how much to tighten the blade,and it works fine. I now also have a Roll In saw. I go to the smaller saw usually,because it is a lot cheaper to use. I only have $40.00 bi metal blades for the Roll In. The small saw is quick and handy to use,too. I can weld 1/2" carbon blades,also.

      Where I worked we bought an import saw of the same type as my Dayton. We used it a lot and wore the top wheel until I had to re cut its edge square.
      It worked fine. Eventually,we got a Roll In,and traded the small saw off. Much of our cutting at the museum was cutting iron carriage tires that had been rolled into circles. The Roll In was very handy for that type work,with a few extra supports for 6' diameter tires.

      One time we bought a piece of brass 5" in diameter,and about 10' long. It was VERY heavy. We just took the legs off the little 4"X6" saw,and laid it on the floor. Then,we just had to get the brass up about 2" off the floor to saw it into more manageable lengths. That worked out pretty well. At that time,we didn't yet have the Roll In,but I didn't want to lift the brass that far anyway!!

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      • #4
        Usually on those saws there is a handle going to the spring with an eye screw that the spring is hooked to. You turn the handle to tighten or loosen the spring to adjust the feedrate of the blade. Kind of primitive, but it kind of works.

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        • #5
          Hang a chuck from the front end of the saw,or get a better motor.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Toolguy
            Usually on those saws there is a handle going to the spring with an eye screw that the spring is hooked to. You turn the handle to tighten or loosen the spring to adjust the feedrate of the blade. Kind of primitive, but it kind of works.
            Yep, doubles as the handle to move the saw around instead of having a knob or crank which might lead some who don't read the manual and aren't observant enough to think that is all it is for.

            If you missed that one, you might not have the blade tension, tracking, guides, etc. set right either.
            http://www.tinyisland.com/4x6bsFAQ.html

            Saw manual:
            http://manuals.harborfreight.com/man...3999/93762.pdf

            websites for vendors that specialize in bandsaw blades or manufacturers will often have technical info.
            http://www.metalsaw.com/Blade-Break-In.cfm
            http://www.toolcenter.com/mm5/mercha...creen=LENOXTSC
            http://www.simonds.cc/publications/b...otingchart.pdf

            Or the apparently defunct North American Sawing Association:
            http://web.archive.org/web/200703232...n.com/PUBS.HTM

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            • #7
              I mounted a counter-counterweight on mine, about 2 lbs of lead placed just above the upper blade guide. It's far enough from the pivot that the saw is back in balance with the bigger motor.

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