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Shop Door - Overhead with entry door?

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  • Shop Door - Overhead with entry door?

    I have a single width overhead door as an entry to my shop.

    The shop itself is the size of a 2 car garage, 20x22, with the one overhead door to the left side. When the shop was spec'd out during our house build I had asked for carriage doors but nobody here in El Paso could supply them so I wound up with the typical aluminum sheet overhead type.

    Back in the 70's I remember an overhead type door with an entry door built in so you could use it without raising the door and loosing heat or cooling.

    Does anyone know if these are still made and if so what company makes them?

    Thanks,

    Tim
    Illigitimi non Carborundum
    9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade. Now I boil oil

  • #2
    I have only seen one overhead door with a small door in it and it was all wood and many years ago. Why did you let them build it without an entry door? If the garage is stick built you can have a side door put in but if it's concrete block it's a bit of a hassle.

    I would get a price for having an entry door installed.
    Last edited by Carld; 08-29-2010, 09:21 PM.
    It's only ink and paper

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    • #3
      They still make them.

      I just saw them listed as an option when I was shopping out steel buildings a couple days ago.

      A little googling should turn something up.

      Brian
      OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

      THINK HARDER

      BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

      MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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      • #4
        Hassle or not, I'd put an entry door in it. Too easy to get stuck in a garage with a single access. If something blows against the door, you're stuck! I don't even know how that passed code. It would be cheaper than buying a new garage door too.

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        • #5
          When You say ''over head door'' do You mean a sectional door of four or more panels , or do You mean a roll up slat or sheet door that is rolled up at the header?

          Sectional doors with a pass door are a little more involved than a roll up door with what they call a wicket door.
          Both types are still used , but usually in a commercial environment.

          What is the size of Your shop door ?

          Steve

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          • #6
            I'm not sure what you mean by "...the typical aluminum sheet overhead type."

            Does it tilt up in one section or fold as it goes up?

            I saw a metal folding garage door with a personnel door built into it years ago, but it was a horribly flimsy arrangement. I searched for a few minutes for an image, but came up with zilch. I expect putting any decent door in a tilt-up garage door would make it too heavy to open manually, and a strain for all but the most powerful openers.

            The bifold door for the airplane hangar I rented had a personnel access door in the lower panel. It was a typical exterior metal door with a steel frame around it. The extra weight didn't matter with the overall weight of the 40' x 16' door.
            Last edited by winchman; 08-30-2010, 12:11 PM.
            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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            • #7
              here is a starting place for ya to research.
              http://www.walkthrugaragedoors.com/

              Steve

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              • #8
                Had one at the old shop and maintenance was constantly working on it. If they were not, it was taped up with do not use tape on it. The building there was built in the late '50's and the doors were probably '80s era.

                They may be better built now days.

                rock~
                Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                • #9
                  Thank you doctor demo that's exactly what I'm talking about.

                  It's a shop and every inch of wall space has something on it or in front of it so another door was just a waste of space. Code says I cant have a door or window that faces a neighbor's property so that rules out 2 sides. I do have a window I could get out if need be.
                  The current door is the standard 4 section residential type garage door. The combo door in the place I worked at in the 70's worked quite well in everyday use so that is why I'm considering it. Honestly in a place with as many ranches and farms as there are around here it was a mystery why I couldn't get real carriage doors. After waiting 19 months for the county,town and builder to get their heads out of their butts and build our house we were relieved that the house came out OK ( some quality tequila goes a long way towards making the foreman have his crew do their best ) and were ready to sign off and move in. The shop door was the least of my worries then. Right now it's a convenience/efficiency thing that I am entertaining options on.

                  Thanks for the replies.

                  Tim
                  Illigitimi non Carborundum
                  9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade. Now I boil oil

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