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  • Atlas 7B Shaper Stand

    Hi folks,

    I'm new here and am the proud owner of a "new" Atlas 7B Shaper sans/legs. The machine has had very little use, and other than some crispy wiring due to age, it seems to be in excellent condition.

    I was going to just build a stand, but since it's such a beautiful machine I thought it would be nice to have the original stand to go with it.

    Does anyone have a stand or legs they would be willing to sell?

    I'm anxious to get the wiring issues resolved so I can start making chips!

    Thanks,

    Mike

  • #2
    welcome to the forum, that's a nice little shaper

    I went through the whole acquire legs, make the wood top/shelf routine. Even did the wood via hand planing and gluing - started with rough sawn hard maple, a lot of work. By the time you ship the legs 100lbs, buy the hardwood and do all the work, well, its a lot effort expense. the results look great though.

    network and watch ebay for them.

    the best alternative i've seen is Docs base - http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...ghlight=shaper

    I was going to replicate Doc's efforts...but buying the material, outsourcing the bends and plasma cutting it was going to cost as well although maybe a little less than the legs
    .

    Comment


    • #3
      You might look for some cast iron legs for a Logan Lathe. I've seen them on ebay occasionally for not too much and they would probably make a nice stand.

      Comment


      • #4
        Mcgyver, I saw your woodwork on the stand.... very nice! I actually used to make stands very similar to Docs, for large machines though.... the side plates were of 1/2" steel. Many years ago I worked at a fab shop while going to college and gained a lot of excellent experience with all phases of fabrication. It actually ended up doing me more good than college.

        I've got the tools to make one like his now, but thought I'd go the original stand route, more like what you did, if I can find the parts.

        Firbikrhd1, I'll try the Logan lathe search on ebay and craigslist.

        Thanks, Mike

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        • #5
          http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_nkw=atl....c0.m270.l1313

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          • #6
            Waterlogged,
            LOL,Great find, Can you do the same for me for a set of pulley guards for a Atlas horizontal mill? I'd send you a finders fee.

            Pete
            Last edited by uncle pete; 08-30-2010, 05:54 PM.

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            • #7
              Be advised that when the Atlas 7B was sold, the pulley guards and stand were OPTIONAL extras. This means that, even allowing for scrapping machines, there are more shapers out there then there are either legs OR belt guards.
              In an earlier post I explained that my machine came with guards, but without legs. Considering that, for the original purchaser, money was of no real concern, I concluded that the legs were deliberately not purchased, possibly because the unit was to be mounted on a bench.
              Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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              • #8

                Wow! Prices on those have certainly gone up since I last saw them. If you like those you may have to watch for a while but I bet sooner or later a less expensive pair will show up.

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                • #9
                  I had an Atlas shaper for a short time, but didn't feel I could justify the space it would take up and sold it. However, before I did, I had to try it, before getting a manual. And broke something, I forgot exactly what. After getting a manual (reprint) off eBay, I found out how to run it and the order in which various adjustments must be made.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't think all of the Atlas Shaper stands were cast Iron.
                    I have what i was told is a Shaper Stand, and it is steel fabrication
                    as you can see in these photos.
                    I have assumed that the square cut out (factory) was for the table mechanism, or drive (?)

                    Rich



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Rigidity

                      One of, if not the main, problem/s with stands for shapers - as opposed to lathes and/or mills - is that the relatively heavy shaper ram reciprocates and due to its mass and momentum transmits all that reversing energy to the floor/slab via the stand/table. This can be quite considerable - particularly at maximum stroke length and speed. It puts a lot of stress on the stand/table and if the stand/table is inadequate can cause the stand/table to oscillate as well.

                      Many stands are cast iron and so - if they are fastened to the floor/slab - have the mass and stiffness/rigidity to resist those forces either entirely or "mostly".

                      I am not at all sure that a "table" - or a set of lathe legs - will be adequate.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Tiffie, I had the same concerns. When I got my shaper, it came on a "locally built" stand consisting of welded 2" angle legs and stretchers, and 2" lumber shelf and top. To prove its military origins, the top was covered in "battleship" linoleum. At full stroke and speed it tended to go "walkabout."
                        I built a stand in the shape of a pyramid with a vertical front. The top is large enough to hold a sheet metal tray, and the shaper sits in it, bolted to the stand. The footprint is such that the entire motion of the shaper is whithin it. Finally, the sides are glued and screwed chipboard, making it very rigid, (and ugly.) At full stroke and speed, it shakes a bit, but does not move around.
                        By the way, do not bother to put drawers in the front. I cant remeber to close them and they catch chips! A rack to hold short stock is good .
                        Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It is correct that the cast iron legs were not the only "stand" offered originally by Atlas. The other most common one is out of sheet metal, which sounds like it would be flimsy, but it is 13ga. and is heavier than it looks! This stand was also shared with the small horizontal mill by Atlas. The correct mounting threads are there for both machines. I prefer the sheet metal one for the inclusion of the chip pan, myself. With the lower shelf (also 13ga.) and the wrap around ends, it is very well cross-braced. I have mine bolted to the floor as well.

                          See here: http://www.flywheelmachinetools.com/...s7bshaper.html
                          Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 08-31-2010, 12:30 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Duffy
                            Be advised that when the Atlas 7B was sold, the pulley guards and stand were OPTIONAL extras. This means that, even allowing for scrapping machines, there are more shapers out there then there are either legs OR belt guards.
                            In an earlier post I explained that my machine came with guards, but without legs. Considering that, for the original purchaser, money was of no real concern, I concluded that the legs were deliberately not purchased, possibly because the unit was to be mounted on a bench.

                            I did not know that the belt guards were optional...interesting.

                            TMT

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Duffy
                              Tiffie, I had the same concerns. When I got my shaper, it came on a "locally built" stand consisting of welded 2" angle legs and stretchers, and 2" lumber shelf and top. To prove its military origins, the top was covered in "battleship" linoleum. At full stroke and speed it tended to go "walkabout."
                              I built a stand in the shape of a pyramid with a vertical front. The top is large enough to hold a sheet metal tray, and the shaper sits in it, bolted to the stand. The footprint is such that the entire motion of the shaper is whithin it. Finally, the sides are glued and screwed chipboard, making it very rigid, (and ugly.) At full stroke and speed, it shakes a bit, but does not move around.
                              By the way, do not bother to put drawers in the front. I cant remeber to close them and they catch chips! A rack to hold short stock is good .
                              Hmm....I really like machine bases with storage in them.

                              How would the group build a machine base for a small shaper that incorporates storage (drawers)? I have an Delta shaper in storage that needs a base built for it. I have seen the OEM wooden cabinet and did not like it.

                              TMT

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