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  • moving a surface grinder

    I have a few days left to move a surface grinder before the owner sells it for scrap. It is a chevalier fs2a20 .It is in a dark corner covered in junk and I have not been able to inspect it properly. Does anyone own one of these machines. I would like to know if it runs on ball racers ? I know nothing of these machines but for $50 I cant go to wrong. If I look under the table it looks like it runs on an inverted vee and a flat just like the ways of a lathe. Is there any special transport procedure to worry about if the table is not on ball racers? Would a pallet jack handle a machine like this as I have to get it out the factory.? Would I be guessing wrong if I estimated a machine like this weighs 800kg. I see it has got two threaded holes on each side of the machine They are 23mm in diameter but look like a fine thread. Is there a standerd eye bolt of this size as I would like to get there and be well prepared .Onother concern I have is if I hold the wheel in my hand and feel for play I cant feel any forward or backward play and it spins quite freely but if I grab the wheel and turn it and then stop suddenly and turn it back and forth it feels as if something knocks .It feels as if there is a continuing inertia like the wheel has stopped but the mass of the spindle is still rotating.Is this normal.? Also does someone know how I could get a electronic manual for this grinder as its hard getting info and even harder getting parts when one lives in africa
    Regards Eugene

  • #2
    Not familier with that make grinder,but I have moved a few.

    Best plan on the table is to lift it off and haul it seperately.If that isn't possible then I would tie the table on with rope so it's not able to move.

    VERY IMPORTANT-do not place binders or straps over the table or spindle,if you do the load exerted by the straps or binders is enough to warp the table.

    There should be lifing pegs or holes in the machine base,that is where it should be secured to the trailer or truck for transport.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      The local college has a Chevalier surface grinder. And yes, the table rides on ball bearings. The bearings ride in a plastic retainer and should be easy to remove by tipping one end of the table.
      When transporting the machine I would either remove the table completely or put some wooden wedges in the corners. This is to prevent the table from sliding around and to keep the bearings from denting the ways if you hit any hard bumps on the road.

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      • #4
        I have read on mulitple boards to remove the table before transportation. On a smaller grinder 2-4 guys could lift the table off and secure it on wood for transport. The bearings should be one bag per side and labled to know what side they came from.

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        • #5
          I recently had to move a Kent KGS-200 that has ball ways. I had to truck it about 120 miles in a short-wheelbase truck with a lift gate. I didn't have time to remove the table and ship it separately, so I just locked the table with it's binding screw (clamps on the reciprocation wire rope drum) and brought both table stops together at the middle bump stop. I then brought the spindle down gently to the table, on top of a large block of soft wood to keep things from bouncing around.

          No problems. I got it home, leveled it, dressed a new wheel and ground the chuck flat. Then I ground a 6" x 9" x 1/2" thick plate of soft steel to a nice finish. I see no indication of the table having peened the balls into the ways during travel.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by PixMan
            I recently had to move a Kent KGS-200 that has ball ways. I had to truck it about 120 miles in a short-wheelbase truck with a lift gate. I didn't have time to remove the table and ship it separately, so I just locked the table with it's binding screw (clamps on the reciprocation wire rope drum) and brought both table stops together at the middle bump stop. I then brought the spindle down gently to the table, on top of a large block of soft wood to keep things from bouncing around.

            No problems. I got it home, leveled it, dressed a new wheel and ground the chuck flat. Then I ground a 6" x 9" x 1/2" thick plate of soft steel to a nice finish. I see no indication of the table having peened the balls into the ways during travel.
            I'm guessing that you didn't notice Adapatap is in South Africa. As I understand it, some of the roads there can be downright hazardous. I have no idea if the route between the two locations is paved or not but a little caution couldn't hurt.
            Though Durban does appear to be quite nice! So maybe his trip will be just fine.
            Last edited by BillDaCatt; 09-02-2010, 12:36 AM.

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            • #7
              If very concerned about the ball ways, it wouldn't be difficult to lift the ends of the table one at a time and insert some wooden or plastic shims. That would be a good alternative to fully removing the table.

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              • #8
                Sure the roads are hazardous, paved huh, I wonder if they have any dirt roads,
                and then with trying to avoid lions, hippos and other large wild life could be quite detramental to such a machine.
                I wonder if Adap has any electricity to power this machine where he lives.
                I think this move should be avoided at all cost

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                • #9
                  verner I just think you are jealous that I am getting a surface grinder.I see that you are not brave enough to show where you live.I notice that there are very few s africans who share on this wonderfull site. And I do have electricty in my house , just not 3 phase. Why dont you travel on our dangerous roads and come visit Durban and teach me how to build a rotary phase converter.?
                  Yes Durban is a wonderfull city.
                  regards eugene

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                  • #10
                    Boys, Boys,---Boys

                    Showed up, as usual, on a Saturday AM to hang out at the shop, drink coffee and BS.

                    Carl had just bought a new Pontiac and was on his hands and knees looking under the rear end. Carl: Ain't no way in hades that anyone can put a trailer hitch under this thing.

                    Jim, the old, bold, division mechanic was in earshot and quietly turned away.

                    Carl suggested that we take my car and go get coffee.

                    Returned to find Jim was within 90% of completion of a dang good looking trailer hitch under Carl's new Pontiac. We approved of the installation, asking Jim why he had started the installation.

                    Jim: All I remember is someone said: 'This installation should be avoided at all costs'.

                    --G

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