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  • kiwi damage pix's O/T

    i got these froma friend. . .

    http://www.crashbang.co.nz/quake040910/index.html

  • #2
    Hey, thanks for that. I just posted the link to my daughter, who is volunteering in South Africa, but will be in NZ next year.

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    • #3
      Looking at all that fallen brick work is frightening. I guess I'll stop grousing about the required reinforcement that California building owners were forced to do. I've been in buildings that had huge metal plates on all brick walls so that they could not peel off in a quake.

      Amazingly, no deaths and only two serious injuries. Wow.

      I noticed in the pictures that many were of the same buildings from different angles. That tends to make it look like every building sustained extreme damage. I'm hoping that most have no to minor damage, like happens here when there's a sizable quake.

      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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      • #4
        Looks to me that a lot of the damage was cause by soil liquifaction. That is what happens when you build on saturated soils or fill.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          That one pic shows what looks to be a river of rubble covering the street. Wow. Where I lived in Africa, houses were largely built from brick or stone to withstand the impact from thunder (or possibly to lessen the impact of thunder inside the home) Those would have crumbled to dust in an earthquake.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            The thick brick walls are built with a fired hard brick on the outside and the rest of the bricks are not fired and they tend to crumble over time. Sometimes the mortar is not a quality mix and it to tends to crumble. Brick buildings are not real good in an Earth quake especially old ones.
            It's only ink and paper

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            • #7
              A magnitude 7 earthquake is a big one. It can cause very severe damage when it occurs close to the surface as this NZ quake did. Another example is from the Loma Prieta Earthquake of 1989 in the San Francisco Bay Area. It was the same size and similar depth and cause massive destruction for a large area. The local engineers learned a lot from that quake in respect of the lack of elasticity of concrete structures.

              This was the result in Oakland where miles of double deck Highway suddenly became single deck. Only by pure blind luck it didn't happen when the road was crammed to maximum capacity during rush hour or the death toll would have been staggering. Of the few that were trapped not many could be rescued as there was no possible way to get to them. Of the vehicles that were on the bottom span many finished up about 12 inches tall.

              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                There is a lot movement evidence of shear (slanted light poles), stress (open fissures), compression (serpentine rail tracks), subsidence, and liquifaction. It had it all save the dread tsunami.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Evan

                  This was the result in Oakland where miles of double deck Highway suddenly became single deck. Only by pure blind luck it didn't happen when the road was crammed to maximum capacity during rush hour or the death toll would have been staggering. Of the few that were trapped not many could be rescued as there was no possible way to get to them. Of the vehicles that were on the bottom span many finished up about 12 inches tall.
                  Seattle has the exact twin of that viaduct. It is slated for replacement if the money can be found, and there is a high tech campaign to urge the populace to buy into it. Much of the area on Elliot Bay is landfill so liquifaction is a major risk:

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWfwnkEbc4Q

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hos_uIKwC-c

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                  • #10
                    Excellent couple of vids that DP posted links to. Don't miss
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dp
                      There is a lot movement evidence of shear (slanted light poles), stress (open fissures), compression (serpentine rail tracks), subsidence, and liquifaction. It had it all save the dread tsunami.

                      My entire family lives in CHCH... as I did. The center and eastern portion of the city is built on a drained swamp - and got hit quite hard in places. Thanks to mostly timber framed houses and strict building codes, most of the residential structures built since the late 50's are intact. Older masonry shell buildings downtown.. well.. like Seattle, suffered. The damage is scattered - one street may be trashed, the next looks like nothing happened. My brother's house in Akaroa (20 miles further to the east) has a few cracks - two across the street are destroyed. Amazing that only two injuries in a city of 400,000, and an earthquake rivaling Haiti.

                      Luckily no Tsunami - the eastern suburbs (on the ocean) are only a few feet above sea level. No chance to go anywhere safe. My parents and sister live 1/4 mile from the sea!

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                      • #12
                        Gosh what a mess,glad no one was killed.

                        That's going to take a long time to fix that damage.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          Most of the spectacular damaged buildings are (were) un-reinforced, double brick cavity wall, as used in England, where most of the early settlers came from.

                          This type of construction relies entirely on gravity to hold together (CF the Ronan Point disaster in London, 1968). It has very little resistance to lateral forces and accordingly little seismic resistance. this particular earthquake shows evidence of ground movement of up to ~3 feet in some places!

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                          • #14
                            On last night's TVNZ news (search www.tvnz.co.nz for video) there were some shots of the fault that ruptured. A geologist stated that it last ruptured 16,000 years ago, and this time had moved laterally up to 4 metres (13 feet). There has also been some quite wild vertical movement.
                            The liquefaction is widespread, and will take a long time to clean up.
                            The preliminary estimates of the cost come in at around 2 billion NZ dollars (about 1.5 billion US). The cost in human terms in incalculable. This is a civilised country, where we take things like decent housing and reliable electricity and sewerage systems for granted, and live accordingly. The mental dislocation of this disruption to the fundamentals of life is terrible for those suffering it.
                            Christchurch is built on silt. Wellington is built on several major faultlines, and nearly all the flat land there is reclaimed from the harbour. (What isn't flat is either vertical or overhanging.) Auckland is build on 32 supposedly extinct volcanos. And I live beside a sink hole on a lava flow that arrived only 10,000 years ago... Were this not such a wonderful country, we should all have to be accounted quite mad to live here!

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                            • #15
                              For those in the USA that think it's all over...

                              From the Press web site :
                              >>>>>>>>>>>

                              Canterbury has received 270 aftershocks or magnitude 3 or above so far since Saturday's earthquake, according to GNS Science.

                              However, GNS seismologist Brian Ferris said people would have felt about 150 of those aftershocks.

                              About 10 aftershocks were between magnitude 5 and 5.5, 60 between 4 and 4.9 and 200 between 3 and 3.9, he said.

                              Since midnight there had been 18 aftershocks.

                              That includes this morning's violent magnitude 5.1 aftershock. Initially believed to be as powerful as 6.1, it hit Canterbury at 7.49am at a depth of 6km in the Lyttelton area. It was preceded by a 4.1 magnitude shock and followed by a 3.8.


                              >>>>>>>>>>


                              My family is getting a bit frayed... hard to sleep when you keep feeling the earth move, then this morning they has another - my Mom thinks it felt stronger then the main quake (it was MUCH closer and shallow). The kids are really upset.

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