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Improvised low tech rotary table

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  • Improvised low tech rotary table

    Had to make a phenolic wahser with ears but no rotary table available. Cut a blank oversize with hole, tunr to major od and thicknes (that stuff really stinks when you machine it), put in drill spindle on lathe, used the crossfeed to set depth, mill to marks on the chuck rotating chuck by hand. Not terribly accurate but solved the problem. Filed ears to final shape. If I were to do again I'd put a collar behind the bushing to keep the cutter from sucking in.


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    Last edited by fishfrnzy; 09-06-2010, 12:06 PM.

  • #2
    OK, why cant I get my 2nd of 3 pics to show?

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    • #3
      They're showing now.

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      • #4
        I like your 'milling spindle' more then the rotary table idea

        Hope you let that chuck rust on real good to prevent it comming off if your gonna mill with it.. :P

        (Little bit of acid or even skin moisture/sweat on a JT taper is by far the best and most common (accidental) way of insuring a JT chuck will never come off, short of destorying the chuck.) Well, that or drill and tap a screw to secure it.
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          Thanks Moons but no worries. Just put the chuck on there for this use and its already off( its a threaded chuck BTW on a straight shaft). Only using an 1/8" cutter and taking off about 1/16 DOC so the cutting forces were very small.

          I have a milling machine but no RT. Now upon reflection though I could have used a rotary indexer with a little more set up time.

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          • #6
            Clever solution.

            You could have done it in the mill also. The fact that you only needed 180 degree indexing is the key. Mount it vertically in the vise and center it under the spindle. Cut one side and raise the spindle. Go to the other side and cut it in the opposite direction.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Having a degree wheel (with or without the vernier) on your lathe would make that a lot easier.

              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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              • #8
                winchman: like the degree wheel/vernier.

                If you have manual change gears, they can be adapted for indexing. You can lock a gear or add a pawl and loosen the banjo to slip the appropriate number of teeth. With a single 96 tooth gear, for example, you can divide a circle into 2,3,4,6,8,12,16,24,32,48, or 96 equal divisions. Other change gears can give other common ratios. By combining two gears and selectively slipping teeth on both gears, you can get 1 degree or finer indexing. Note that you can't just multiply the numbers of teeth on each gear because any submultiple of both gear sizes will only count once rather than twice. Thus a 72 and 20 tooth gear will "beat" together 4 times per revolution giving 1degree rather than 0.25 degree resolution. Slipping teeth on the 72 tooth gear gives you 5 degree resolution and also slipping teeth on the 20 tooth gear allows you to subdivide by 5 to get 1 degree resolution. Take out the backlash, of course, and lock the spindle (or the chuck if it is a screw on).

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                • #9
                  Nice-'n'-simple

                  Originally posted by fishfrnzy
                  Had to make a phenolic wahser with ears but no rotary table available. Cut a blank oversize with hole, tunr to major od and thicknes (that stuff really stinks when you machine it), put in drill spindle on lathe, used the crossfeed to set depth, mill to marks on the chuck rotating chuck by hand. Not terribly accurate but solved the problem. Filed ears to final shape. If I were to do again I'd put a collar behind the bushing to keep the cutter from sucking in.


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                  http://i875.photobucket.com/albums/a...washer2res.jpg
                  x
                  http://i875.photobucket.com/albums/a...washer3res.jpg
                  I have no reservations about using a Jacobs chuck in that situation - at all.

                  I would have supported the fibre disk with brass (optional steel) washers so that the helix on the cutter did not "pull" the fibre disk.

                  As the OP said he didn't have a rotary table, I presume that inasmuch as he didn't say that he didn't have a mill that he has a vertical mill.

                  In that situation, I'd have used my "Spindexer" clamped vertically to an angle plate. My Spindexer has a C5>ER-32 collet adaptor, so i could hold any shaft between 2.0mm (~0.080") and 20mm (~0.800").

                  The index marks on the Spindexer are good enough to "eye-in" the required angular settings to about +/- 1 degree.

                  Just use the collet fastening handle to rotate the Spindexer spindle and the job.

                  The Spindexer is one of the most versatile and under-regarded and under-used tools in the shop.





                  If I need to index on my lathe, I measure the outside diameter of the spindle flange, multiply it by "pi" (3.1416) which gives me its circumference, draw a line that long on a bit of paper, and divide it into the number of divisions I need, and then tape it to my lathe spindle flange. I use a scriber/pointer on a magnetic base (on the lathe bed or the carriage), set it to the scale and away I go.

                  If I want to fix my head-stock spindle for - say - drilling, etc., I just wedge a bit of wood between my lather bed and the chuck or spindle flange, do my drilling etc. knock the wedge out, go to the next hole, re-insert the wedge ............. etc.

                  All too often here stuff is "over-thought" and quick, easy solutions are not only over-looked but are not even looked for.

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