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  • Silver and Demming Drill Bits

    I've always wondered about what Silver & Demming means.

    Does S&D mean anything other than the fact that they always seem to be 1/2" and larger and have a reduced 1/2" shank? If there is nothing else special about them, why would they not just be called reduced shank bits?

    Does anybody know the answer? Google searches just seem to come up with hundreds of sets of bits for sale.

  • #2
    orginally a brand name i believe, they've come to mean (larger) drill bits with a turned down, cylindrical shank that are of a size where a standard drill bit would have a taper shank
    .

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    • #3
      One particular type of reduced-shank drill bits are Silver & Deming (S&D) bits, which have a 1/2" reduced shank, and are 6" long with a 3" flute length which are designed for slow-speed (350rpm or less) large-scale boring.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill_bit_shank

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      • #4
        Drill

        Silver and Demming is the brand name of a company that produced the familiar short length drills with the cut down shank. The name has been commonly used for that style of drills and is similar to people calling and adjustable wrench a "Cresent" wrench.

        JRW

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        • #5
          And they fit one of these, which the company, or part of it, also made a version of, IIRC

          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            I believe that Silver and Demming were two blacksmiths back in the 1800's who developed that large type drill bit. Back then holes were punched out in steel that was heated red hot. Somehow the name stuck.

            JL...............

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            • #7
              Here is the history of Silver & Demming Manufacturing...http://www.owwm.com/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=1017

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              • #8
                There is only one "m" in "Deming".

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                • #9
                  Silver and Deming has simply become a generic term for that style of drill bit. Up here in the Great White North we generally call them "Prentiss" drills. Means the same thing...
                  Keith
                  __________________________
                  Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                  • #10
                    I've often wondered aloud why Silver >> OR << Deming couldn't have come up with idea.

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                    • #11
                      Interesting, i too often wondered about this but never tried to research it.

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                      • #12
                        S & D drill go back to the time before drill chucks were to be had.

                        You either used a taper shank, like a Morse or collets. The S & D drills could be used with out always having to change the collet.
                        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for pointing that out. I often wonder how gents who profess to machine to a "thou" can't spell correctly.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by marinusdees View Post
                            Thanks for pointing that out. I often wonder how gents who profess to machine to a "thou" can't spell correctly.
                            ??
                            Because one has extraordinarily little to do with the other. I will refrain from comment regarding sentence structure.
                            Location: North Central Texas

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by marinusdees View Post
                              Thanks for pointing that out. I often wonder how gents who profess to machine to a "thou" can't spell correctly.
                              ... can't spell fashionably.

                              there I fixed that for you.
                              --
                              Tom C
                              ... nice weather eh?

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