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Size and sourse for VFD

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  • Size and sourse for VFD

    I know I'm going to get a lot of replies recommending Teco VFDs but at least explain why. Personally I prefer and work with Allen Bradly 400 / 300 series Power Flex drives, but never fed from a single phase sourse

    I'm looking for a "Good Deal" on a VFD for my 5-Hp Leblond motor that I'll be powering with 240v single phase. I'll need to derate the VFD properly as to allow the 240v line side supply. I was thinking a 7.5-Hp or 10-Hp VFD would be adequate.

    Additionally which features do you find the most beneficial in the operation of your LATHE, - accel time, breaking, ect, ect

  • #2
    Try automationdirect.com. Have three and work fine.

    Comment


    • #3
      How rude of me, here is the link.
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc/Home/Home

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by quadrod
        How rude of me, here is the link.
        http://www.automationdirect.com/adc/Home/Home
        Great website but they don't have any thing for a 5-Hp motor with a single phase input

        Comment


        • #5
          Breaking is a nice feature,stopping the chuck in one rev from 1,000 rpm is nice.

          As for the AB drives,I like them too,but never tried 1~ input to one.It might be possible I have some AB's that I rescued from the scrapyard,440vac inputs,but in programing I noticed a que for voltage and explored it,it listed 220 and 440 as options,so I selected 220 and it worked.It derated it by 1/2,but since I got the things for free who cares right?

          Here are some VFD's being sold as 1~ input units,but I have to wonder if they are really derated 3~ being sold for more money.

          http://www.driveswarehouse.com/Drive...37a02c3a4cb4b0
          Last edited by wierdscience; 09-12-2010, 01:28 PM.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            You may find that a VFD may not be your best resort, Joe.

            When you get into the 5HP range, a single phase powered VFD usually doesn't offer 'constant torque' (sensorless vector), is extremely pricey and sucks some sizeable power, taxing older residential power installations.

            Your best bet might be a rotary phase converter (and that's coming from a big VFD fan).

            Good luck,

            Fred

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            • #7
              I wish some one here would buy a Phase Perfect and then post a schematic for a DIY version.Sadly they cost a mint

              http://www.phaseperfect.com/
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pherdie
                Your best bet might be a rotary phase converter (and that's coming from a big VFD fan).

                Good luck,

                Fred
                My RPC is rated for 7.5 Hp but no single motor over 3 Hp

                Question being is it better to build a larger RPC or look for a VFD that will handle the job

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                • #9
                  how often is that LeBlonde actually going to be pulling 5hp ?

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                  • #10
                    What do you guys think of this 1

                    http://cgi.ebay.com/4KW-VARIABLE-FRE...item3cb00a0b1c

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                    • #11
                      Your could make/buy a larger rpc, or add a secondary (say 7hp) idler (that's different to what the manf is refering to "max starting hp load" to your existing rpc (increase fuse and/or breaker sizes...). Then if you like, run that into the much cheaper surplus 3 phase only vfd's...

                      Specs... my commercial rpc is supposed to start a 5hp load, but it won't start my 4hp lathe in higher gears. Well... it will, but the voltage sag on the generated leg is so much that the thermal trips on the lathe pop (just as well).


                      There are several 5hp single phase input vfd's available. Ignoring the Chinese non-major-brand "shipped direct from Hong Kong" models, most are about $600.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeFin


                        I looked at those when I was trying to decide what to do.

                        It's your money... personally, I won't buy that stuff. Yes, it's half the cost of the USA made stuff, but I won't risk my motors etc. Ask them if it's UL approved. When they say yes, ask them for the testing and approval numbers...

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                        • #13
                          I have a 1θ to 3θ AB VFD that just kicks butt. It's only 1HP, but all I need is 1HP. Very feature rich including the much appreciated braking by winding the frequency down to 0 Hz while powering the motor. No big resistors needed.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeFin
                            That's a router spindle drive,notice the 400htz upper.

                            Could you see an 1800 rpm motor running at 400htz

                            There is another seller in Hong Kong goes by Happy,lucky sunshine or some such that sells 0-120htz models,I think EVguru has bought from them.
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What do you guys think of this 1

                              http://cgi.ebay.com/4KW-VARIABLE-FRE...em3cb00a 0b1c
                              In my opinion there is insufficient information in the posting to use that unit. There is no mention of derating when utilizing single phase power and no mention of actual maximum input power required for quoted output, a real "pig in a poke."

                              5 HP requires a lot of electrical power (from a residential standpoint), especially to get a motor started, and the old US motors really made their rated power, necessitating adequate input power.

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