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Lathe Turning of Rubber Seals ????

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  • #16
    The size of these seals are .437 od x .220 id and the height is .188. I found some Buna tube, 7/16" od x .250 id, I'll cut some 1/4" segments and put one in a 5C collet and mount it vertical on the surface grinder and square up the end, flip it over and grind down the other end to the .188. I think that will work. I did try to punch these out of a piece of Buna sheet. I have a Mayhew punch set that will do various sizes of id and od combinations all in one shot but what happens when you punch them out is they tend to skew to one side or end up hour glass shaped. In case your wondering what these seals are for ...... I have an old Blackhawk 4 ton port a power, the seal is in the ram half of the coupler.

    JL....................

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    • #17
      I have turned alot of polyurethane for suspension bushings on cars. I start with a solid rod. Cut it down to four inch lengths, freeze them and drill and bore them one at a time out of the freezer. Then I mount them on a mandrel, they are at room temp now. And use a belt sander to take down the OD. Works for me. Oh, I cut to length with a bandsaw, my tolerances are not nearly close to yours. Thank God. If they made choppers like I make cars they would be outta pilots JR
      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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      • #18
        I don't think the tolerances are that critical on something that is going to be compressed as most seals are. I think if I'm with in + - .010 of an acceptable fit it will work just fine. Have you ever checked the tolerances of O-rings, thier very gracious.
        I'll post some pics if I get the time.

        JL...................

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        • #19
          Make yourself punches, and punch the seals.

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          • #20
            I had to make a rubber bush for a gearbox out of urathene (the part cost $500 to buy as you had to buy a complete gearstick assembly)

            I used a shackle bush and ground it with the dremel (used the drum sanding attachment), with huge success.... Turning it was a complete failure... You can freeze it but it will thaw in seconds...
            Precision takes time.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Ringer
              I had to make a rubber bush for a gearbox out of urathene (the part cost $500 to buy as you had to buy a complete gearstick assembly)

              I used a shackle bush and ground it with the dremel (used the drum sanding attachment), with huge success.... Turning it was a complete failure... You can freeze it but it will thaw in seconds...
              You are spot on Ringer, freezing sounds good in theory does not work in practice, unless you have liquid nitrogen maybe. I have had good results grinding rubber and silicone rubber on a cylindrical grinder.

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              • #22
                As others may have said, I use an Xacto knife in the toolpost, or a sharpened tube for holes.

                Soapy water, oil, WD40, anything for lube.

                .

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                • #23
                  You could keep it cold while turning by directing a stream of compressed "greenhouse gas" at it. or wear gloves and use a stick of dry ice to get it cold again between cuts.

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                  • #24
                    I finally had some success in making the seals. I ended up grinding the ends flat on the surface grinder after I cut the segments out of some buna tube. The first picture is my first attempt to punch out the seals from buna sheet. As you can see I can't control the shape. They end up with an hour glass shape or a slant. Hard to punce compressable material.
                    The second picture is the finished product which was ground.
                    The third picture is the ram and hose coupler halves and a look down inside the female coupler of the ram. You can see the thin washer that sits on top of the seal. The way this deal works is much like the way a garden hose washer seals againt it's mateing parts. The male end of the coupler compresses the seal when the tightened and a small portion of the seal kind of blurps up through the center of the washer making flat contact with the face of the male coupler. The washer allows the ram to piviot with little resistance on the hose coupler. This is really a low grade or poor design for a hydraulic coupler, it would have been much better to go with a quick detach type like on a snow plow, but they are big and expensive. So anyway..... it seems to be holding. The problem with the original seal was that it leaked when not preassurized, when preassurized it was OK.

                    JL................






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                    • #25
                      This thread is very informative to me. I have several connectors of that type and have a feeling some are going to leak when I try to use them.
                      Don Young

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