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  • So guess what this will make...

    Here is a shot of the bottom half of a rubber injection mold...

    See if you can guess what it is I'm making here.

    Give you a hint... if you were an old-school lineman you'd be shocked to find out that they are made of polymer now, not ceramics.





    Everything is arriving on schedule, we should be able to restart production end of October.
    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
    Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
    Plastic Operators Dot Com

  • #2
    Looks like a high voltage suspension insulator.

    RWO

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    • #3
      Looks like High Voltage insulators, I can remember calculating the charge in electromagnetic theory class!

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      • #4
        Well, that's three of us that guessed correctly.

        It helped that I knew what a 'lineman' is, but I already had an inkling.

        Dan
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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        • #5
          Any shots of the finished product?

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          • #6
            What plastic are you injecting into those?

            Should'nt they have a slight mushroom shape to the rain seperators to keep it from forming a wet path as the droplets can travel along vertical surfaces? I thought thats why the old ones where basicly bowl shaped seperators.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              Suspension insulator / "dead-end" insulator depending on the hardware we install on the ends.

              I'll have to post pictures of a finished product later.

              They are shaped in such a way that the water will flow off of the sheds, and the material also plays a roll in the water-flow dynamic as well.

              The material... a special "flavor" of EPDM rubber. The core consists of a fiberglass rods, the rubber forms a "boot" and "shed" structure over the rod. On the ends of the rod... depending on the customer, the desired application and other deep mojo we crimp/silicon-bond metal hardware. The most common design is a Eye And Clevis design.


              Now specifically, this is a 25KV rated insulator. I will also be molding a 15KV and a 35KV rated unit as well.

              Got all the special test equipment in house already, as well as the hardware assembly equipment.

              Each unit has to be "proof tested" to a certain tension... and every 100 units a set has to be tested to it's ultimate yield strength.

              As for external certifications... they have to be re-certified every year... or on a vendor change. For example if I change rubber suppliers I have to send samples to the testing lab and they certify the "insulator-ness" and other important numbers.


              I have all this stuff documented in binders, and I actually know quite a bit more that I'm saying... I got a case of Schlitz I'm working through at the moment so I can't be arsed to go get real numbers.

              Plus I'm watching the wife paint. It is utterly fascinating watching her turn gobs of color into a picture that only exists in her mind.
              This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
              Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
              Plastic Operators Dot Com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Liger Zero

                Plus I'm watching the wife paint. It is utterly fascinating watching her turn gobs of color into a picture that only exists in her mind.

                .......and that's just the kitchen wall....

                Tim

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                • #9
                  Hmmm...you must have moved to China.

                  Most of the power line equipment I see is NOT made in the USA.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mike Burdick
                    Hmmm...you must have moved to China.

                    Most of the power line equipment I see is NOT made in the USA.

                    That reminds me...a long time ago some bean counter at our provincial electrical utility decided there was substantial money to be saved by buying 15Kv pin type porcelain insulators from China. Right off the bat you could see the glaze was crappy and as time went on, we had many faults directly attributable to these insulators. They would actually shrink and crack apart! That would sooner or later cause an outage and if we were lucky, just a flashover... if unlucky, it burnt the structure down.Their initial capital saving was spent many many times over replacing them after outages, either on regular time or overtime (not to mention the cost of rebuilding destroyed structures).
                    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Mike, Lapp and Victor Insulator have huge operations up here still.
                      This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                      Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                      Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                      • #12
                        This product line can claim five million installed units since 1996 with only one failure... and the utility company worked closely with the then owners to correct the fault so it can't happen again.

                        I am taking over production and I am not changing ANYTHING in regards to methods, materials or technique until I get a better grasp on how it all works together.

                        I am at the plant where they are made currently. I'll be here until 4pm... let me see if I can snap a picture or two of the press.


                        Originally posted by Arcane
                        That reminds me...a long time ago some bean counter at our provincial electrical utility decided there was substantial money to be saved by buying 15Kv pin type porcelain insulators from China. Right off the bat you could see the glaze was crappy and as time went on, we had many faults directly attributable to these insulators. They would actually shrink and crack apart! That would sooner or later cause an outage and if we were lucky, just a flashover... if unlucky, it burnt the structure down.Their initial capital saving was spent many many times over replacing them after outages, either on regular time or overtime (not to mention the cost of rebuilding destroyed structures).
                        This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                        Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                        Plastic Operators Dot Com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          They just installed those in our neighbourhood last week. After they did that my lights have started to flicker.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Blazing Electric Death is (c)Bravo Foxtrot Lima Industries, All Rights Reserved

                            Originally posted by Evan
                            They just installed those in our neighbourhood last week. After they did that my lights have started to flicker.
                            A common complaint after installing Victor Insulator's version of our product.

                            I can solve this very easily.

                            1) Get the biggest most powerful rifle you have access to.
                            2) Start your backup generator and disconnect from the grid.
                            2.5) Tell your buddy "ya'll come here watch this now." Tell your other buddy "Here ya'll hold my beer for me." (**)
                            3) Go outside and shoot the mother*****er off the pole.
                            4) Repeat until ALL of them throughout the town are gone or you run out of ammo or you get arrested.
                            5) Tell your utility company to insist on Volt Tek brand Dead End Insulators. Tell them to order direct and tell them that Brian sent you.

                            (*) Very Serious Disclaimer: Please do not shoot at insulators on telephone poles as this could result in very serious sh1t happening such as BLAZING ELECTRIC DEATH caused by falling wires or you could get ARRESTED.
                            (**) Regional dialect may vary.
                            Last edited by Liger Zero; 09-19-2010, 04:15 PM.
                            This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                            Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                            Plastic Operators Dot Com

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                            • #15
                              I'm guessing there is a crappy neutral and they disturbed it when they were up the pole. I will have to make some oscillograms of the power to see what I can find. It so happen that the lead engineer in charge of BC hydro Transmission Systems owes me a favor since I took pictures of his insulators during the fire season.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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