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Old mill, worth the effort?

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  • Old mill, worth the effort?

    worth the effort for $265 or am I gonna have to spend lots of money on collets etc to get it to go?

    Takes R8 taper. No tooling included. Weighs about 500 lbs



  • #2
    How are the vise and table? And the motor? Motor looks small.

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    • #3
      motor is a single phase dayton at 3/4 hp per plate. If I do this I would up the motor hp and add a VFD.

      Just not sure if this is where/how I want to spend my dollars. But price is attractive as right now dont have a lot to spend

      Dont know anything else.

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      • #4
        That appears to be a combination vertical and horizonal knee mill, which is a neat find. If it takes R8 tooling, it will be cheap and easy to obtain what you need. The condition of the rest of the machine is certainly a factor. The importance of many such condition factors depends on the accuracy of the work you intend to do. The price is right !

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        • #5
          What is the brand?

          Rgds
          Michael

          Australia

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          • #6
            I think its Garvin

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            • #7
              Here is a little info on Garvin Mills.

              http://www.lathes.co.uk/garvinmillers/



              Rgds
              Michael

              Australia

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              • #8
                the more I look at it, the more I think its been tinkered with.... To me, it looks like someone switched the top arm around, mounted some kind of head to it and taaadddaaaa, a vertical mill....

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                • #9
                  Not worth the effort, IMHO.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    I might not have a super valid opinion, but I'm not seeing a way to lower the quill....and to me that's something that I need for a machine like this to be of a lot of use to me.

                    I guess as a straight up miller you would set the DOC and then mill away....but unless I had a lot of room and some extra dough, this just wouldn't get as much use as I'd like to get out of it.

                    That's just my 1 cent.

                    John

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                    • #11
                      It is, or was a horizontal mill. As currently configured, someone cobbled some type of head onto the end of what was the mill's overarm. The actual milling spindle is below it and has had its cone pulley removed. The motor and head setup aren't original and the vice on the table is a drill press angle vise. The right angle head might be of interest to someone, if it could be identified. I seriously doubt that the milling head on it is R8, more likely B&S #7 or 9.

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                      • #12
                        I do not know how good the head is but if the table and the knee are in good condition there is certainly the makings of a quite rigid basic vertical mill.

                        For the price I would buy it as a 'project'.

                        John

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                        • #13
                          Worth the scrap price - 20% for hauling.

                          If you look at it as a project, the outcome will be an antique mill plus a lot of time invested. It will not be a very useful tool.

                          I'd pay 50 bucks and put it on my driveway.


                          Nick

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                          • #14
                            That looks like a practical machine for a home shop, especially one with space constraints and where there is an interest horizontal milling and antique machines.

                            I would suggest just using the existing motor, especially if you are concerned about the cost of tooling. That is a lightweight machine for its size so it may not be built for heavy hogging (though it must be able to take some force on X for horizontal milling but it seems to lack provisions for the arbor braces) and you can do a lot with 3/4 horsepower. Use the money for tooling.

                            Drilling could be a pain as it doesn't appear to have a quill so you have to raise and lower the knee. Y travel may be limited.

                            The vertical spindle is probably a retrofit or at least has been rebored for R8 (if it is actually R8). I don't think R8 existed when that machine was made. Garvin, did, interestingly make a vertical (only) mill back in about 1902. Garvin advertised horizontal mills similar to the one pictured, but with a different Z elevation mechanism as plain millers.

                            http://blacksmithandmachineshop.com/...16-PG-106.html

                            I think seller is wrong about the vintage - that is probably about a century old. The flat belt cone pulleys are missing.

                            It will need some restoration work, though the condition from what little we can see looks pretty good.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lazlo
                              Not worth the effort, IMHO.
                              Ditto. While the price seems attractive, I think you will find it needs a lot of TLC to bring it back to a useable state and, even then, it will probably lack the features that you would most like to have. A quill is one such feature.

                              I dunno ... it just looks like a "hack job" of a mill.

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