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Nutserts, I want the opposite.

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  • Nutserts, I want the opposite.

    I have a nutsert tool and a selection of nutserts, but want to know the correct term and source for the ones that are not a nut, but have a threaded bolt type section instead. I suppose you would call them a stud?

    Nev
    Nev.

  • #2
    The ones I have used are called PEM studs:
    http://www.pemnet.com/fastening_prod...for+Sheetmetal

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    • #3
      Pem studs, self clinching studs.. All the same thing concept wise...

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      • #4
        Bugger. Links did not work.

        nev
        Last edited by NiftyNev; 10-01-2010, 08:28 AM.
        Nev.

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        • #5
          The folks with the PEM brand/trademark (Penn Engineering and Manufacturing, IIRC) do a lot of things just like what you refer to.

          Nuts, studs, spacers and standoffs, snap-top standoffs (for PC boards) etc. Pretty much all of them require precisely sized holes and special equipment to seat them right. I HAVE seated them in softer material with cruder tooling...

          "Nutserts" as I know them, are a crimp-in type, typically with a collapsing flanged tube that ends up with a flange on both sides of the sheet metal. They can be inserted with a simple hand press.

          I am not aware of a stud version, but I have never looked for one.

          Alternatives are butt-spot-welded studs etc which are commercial items, typically with welding protrusions.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            How big do you need the studs?

            For sizes 10 mm +, automotive wheel studs are widely available. Just press them into a drilled hole from the back. Some even have a square shoulder ahead of the knurl that will broach the last few thou off an undersize hole if you push hard enough.
            Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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            • #7
              McMaster have a stud version -
              http://www.mcmaster.com/#studs/=93907x
              but they are only imperial. Where you get them in Oz, I have no idea - I usually have to go to McMaster for some of this more interesting hardware.

              Michael

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              • #8
                Originally posted by J Tiers
                "Nutserts" as I know them, are a crimp-in type, typically with a collapsing flanged tube that ends up with a flange on both sides of the sheet metal.
                That's them.

                Originally posted by form_change
                McMaster have a stud version -
                http://www.mcmaster.com/#studs/=93907x
                but they are only imperial. Where you get them in Oz, I have no idea - I usually have to go to McMaster for some of this more interesting hardware.
                Thanks for the link. These are what I am after but in metric. 5,6 and 8mm would be good to find.

                http://www.mcmaster.com/#studs/=93a256

                This is the type of tool I have.

                MFX612s

                http://www.masterfix.com/uk/mfx-612s.asp

                Nev
                Last edited by NiftyNev; 10-01-2010, 05:59 PM.
                Nev.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by NiftyNev
                  I have a nutsert tool and a selection of nutserts, but want to know the correct term and source for the ones that are not a nut, but have a threaded bolt type section instead. I suppose you would call them a stud?

                  Nev
                  Like this ?? (video @ bottom)
                  http://www.boellhoff.de/en/de/fasten...ogy/rivkle.php

                  from -
                  http://www.hengze-fastening.com/blin...rivetstud2.htm

                  or
                  http://www.harrisonsilverdale.com/pr...RIVETNUTS.html

                  john
                  John

                  I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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                  • #10
                    Nutsert?

                    Why not just use a standard nutsert and locktight a piece of threaded rod into it?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bob Fisher
                      Why not just use a standard nutsert and locktight a piece of threaded rod into it?
                      Have thought of that but would prefer the proper fitting if available for a reasonable price. It would also mean I do not have to purchase the mandrels for the studs which I don't have at the moment.

                      Nev
                      Nev.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jugs
                        Thanks for the link. I see they offer samples. I'll see if someone I know on another forum over there can get samples and send to me.

                        http://www.harrisonsilverdale.com/fa...6/TPL/189.html

                        Nev
                        Nev.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeh lern sompin ever day.......

                          I never saw those before, but for sure they are the "opposite" type to a "nutsert".........
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NiftyNev
                            Have thought of that but would prefer the proper fitting if available for a reasonable price. It would also mean I do not have to purchase the mandrels for the studs which I don't have at the moment.

                            Nev
                            You dont NEED a mandrel - 2 greased washers + a nut + spanner
                            & only slightly slower than the mandrel.

                            john
                            John

                            I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Found someone in Oz who has some. Here's the link in case anyone down here is looking for them.

                              www.profast.com.au

                              Nev
                              Nev.

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