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  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by David Powell
    Just a little tip, while you are learning, and probably knocking the smaller end mills about a bit in various ways, buy cheaper, offshore ones. Once you feel you have got " The touch" to be able to get a reasonable job using them go out and buy ' quality' ones ( Niagara brand come immediately to mind).
    Great advice. Get a set of the cheap 2- and 4- flute Chicom endmills in the pine box. You'll gank most of them learning speeds and feeds (especially depth of cut).

    When you're comfortable with the mill, get name-brand endmills -- Niagara, OSG, Putnam, ... which are made from vastly better tool steel.

    Leave a comment:


  • vpt
    replied
    I went on ebay and bought lot auctions of end mills and hss lathe bits. Cheap, you get a whole variety, and sometimes you get some good quality ones in the bunch.

    I payed something like $15-20 for 5 pounds of HSS lathe bits when I got my lathe. Best investment I made yet! There were even some carbide bits in the bunch that I use for hard metals.

    Leave a comment:


  • jack3140
    replied
    end mills

    thanks guys for the info and tips i finally succeeded in making something useful with my lathe and small horizontal mill i made a ball turner cant wait to try it thanks again jack

    Leave a comment:


  • David Powell
    replied
    Quality will make a difference---

    Just a little tip, while you are learning, and probably knocking the smaller end mills about a bit in various ways, buy cheaper, offshore ones. Once you feel you have got " The touch" to be able to get a reasonable job using them go out and buy ' quality' ones ( Niagara brand come immediately to mind).You will then be able to do a really good job without hesitation or worry. Hope this helps your pocket book and your enjoyment of our great hobby. regards David Powell.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tobias-B
    replied
    Color of chips (when you're in steel) can be really valuable feedback-
    usually, if they're darker than 'straw' you're working something too
    fast or too hard... as a beginner.

    I too have killed my fair share of mills...

    t

    Leave a comment:


  • jack3140
    replied
    Originally posted by miker
    Hi whoever you are and where ever you are.

    Here are a couple of starters.....

    http://www.custompartnet.com/calcula...speed-and-feed

    http://machine-tools.netfirms.com/17...ed_Milling.htm

    http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist...ill-Data-1.gif

    I am just learning also and nothing is set in stone.

    Size and rigidity of your mill plus the type of material being machined will require you to experiment around the guidelines from the charts and calculators.

    I'm sure some of the more knowledgeable members will chime in and get you on the right track.

    Rgds
    hi my name is jacques i live in montreal canada and i am a retired electrician and i spend my days of leisure trying my hand a making things having fun while i still can lol have a nice day

    Leave a comment:


  • jack3140
    replied
    thanks for the tips i,ll give it a shot jack

    Leave a comment:


  • miker
    replied
    Hi whoever you are and where ever you are.

    Here are a couple of starters.....

    http://www.custompartnet.com/calcula...speed-and-feed

    http://machine-tools.netfirms.com/17...ed_Milling.htm

    http://www.davehylands.com/Machinist...ill-Data-1.gif

    I am just learning also and nothing is set in stone.

    Size and rigidity of your mill plus the type of material being machined will require you to experiment around the guidelines from the charts and calculators.

    I'm sure some of the more knowledgeable members will chime in and get you on the right track.

    Rgds

    Leave a comment:


  • Black_Moons
    replied
    Its all about SFM: Surface feet per min. Thats RPM*PI*Diamiter of endmill/12 (the 12 is for inchs to feet)

    Generaly you want around 80~100 for HSS verus mild steel, 200 for HSS verus aluminum. Check graphs or manufacturer recommendations for more details/metals/carbide. Generaly carbide is 2x or more faster, depending on the carbide. Harder materials are generaly slower while softer ones are faster. Other things like the material melting on you (plastics) might limit SFM.

    Less 'SFM' will greatly IMPROVE tool life. But make sure you lower your 'feed rate' (RPM of handle * distance moved per revolution = IPM) to keep the same 'Chip load' per tooth (RPM * IPM * number of flutes of endmill)

    The quoted words are words you want to google to learn about this.
    (If any of my math disagrees with what the web or others here say, Go with the web/others, this is just roughly off the top of my head)

    Check web/others here for recommendations on chip load per tooth, Depends on endmill diamiter mainly.
    Last edited by Black_Moons; 10-07-2010, 08:41 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jack3140
    started a topic end mills

    end mills

    would somebody be kind enough to give me a quick explanation of the speeds to use for milling with end mills trying hard to learn making so many mistakes ...................... lol thanks
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