Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Computer Router Problem?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Computer Router Problem?

    I'm having trouble with the router on my computer. I have a desktop that I use 99% of the time with a wired connection straight from the wireless router and a laptop that uses the wireless connection from the router. I can't get online with the desktop and I haven't tried my laptop as I usually only use it when I go out of time. Anyway, I unhooked the router and hooked the computer straight up to the modem and now I can access the internet. This is a Belkin router that is probably 5 to 6 years old. Do these things go bad? Is there a simple way to check them? As always any help is much appreciated.
    Jonathan P.

  • #2
    Originally posted by japcas
    Do these things go bad? Is there a simple way to check them?
    Yes, they definitely go bad. If everything was working, and you didn't change any of your desktop or laptop settings, one possibility is that your service provider changed your IP address, and you have the router set for static IP.

    I wouldn't suggest changing the router settings if you're not comfortable with them, but look at the DHCP settings on the router and on the desktop.

    By the way, you can buy a router at Fry's or Best Buy for $40 these days, so you're due for a replacement anyway
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

    Comment


    • #3
      If the router is actually bad, you probably will not get your "network connected" symbol which is normally down on the right with XP next to the time. You can also check network status through the control panel.

      You also may simply have lost the setup in the router.... Although often that simply results in an open wireless..... it might on yours need more setup.

      You might check if the wireless is passworded still. if it has lost its setup the password may be gone, in which case the network is wide open for anyone with a wireless.

      Mine (a D-Link....... never again) does that every so often. From time to time it also seems to get a "full cache" and needs a powerline reset to start working again. While "full" it will not pass any traffic
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        Turn them all off. Turn on the cablemodem, give it a minute or two for the lights to come on. Then turn on the router, and give it a couple of minutes, then turn one of the PCs on. When it comes up, go to a DOS prompt, and type IPCONFIG. Does it have anything listed for a default gateway?

        What kind of security do you have setup on it?


        Andy

        Comment


        • #5
          I knew the cost of the routers had come way down and that isn't a problem if I have to replace it.

          I have reset both the router and the modem many times over the years and tried that this morning but nothing seemed to work until I bypassed the router all together. I do have it set up for password protection so others can't use my connection.

          Also, the desktop, router, and modem are on a backup power supply for when the power blinks, which is quite often here at my house. So my service isn't usually interupted with power jitters.
          Jonathan P.

          Comment


          • #6
            Did you reset the power, or a hard reset back to factory defaults?


            Andy

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by murph64
              Did you reset the power, or a hard reset back to factory defaults? Andy
              I reset the power for about 3 minutes. That is all I remember how to do. It's been so long since I set the original settings for the router I can't even remember how to get to them. I guess I need to do some searching.
              Jonathan P.

              Comment


              • #8
                What model is it?

                Andy

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by murph64
                  Did you reset the power, or a hard reset back to factory defaults?
                  Reasonable advice, but note that reseting to factory defaults will erase all your network settings.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's a Belkin Wireless G router. Model no. F5D7230-4.
                    Jonathan P.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      http://www.belkin.com/support/articl...=5999&scid=221

                      Here's the manual


                      edit - to reset it says just push and release the reset button, but I've found most of the time you need to hold it down for a few seconds to up to 30 seconds. Ususally the lights will flash when the reset is complete.
                      Last edited by murph64; 10-10-2010, 11:42 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by murph64
                        http://www.belkin.com/support/articl...=5999&scid=221

                        Here's the manual


                        edit - to reset it says just push and release the reset button, but I've found most of the time you need to hold it down for a few seconds to up to 30 seconds. Ususally the lights will flash when the reset is complete.

                        The length of time you hold the button down is the difference between resetting (reboot) and restoring factory default settings.

                        Some cable modems will only talk to the device that they see hooked directly to the the modem when the cable modem finishes its power-on cycle. They've made it so simple that it becomes complex when you do anything beyond what they expected.

                        Routers do tend to die early when they are allowed to overheat. I have manufactured 2/4 inch high standoffs made of 75% nickel, 25% copper with a covering made of cellophane adhered by a liquid acrylic polymer. They look just like a stack of 5 cent pieces held together with scotch tape. It's not a bad look.

                        Seriously, heat kills electronics, so make sure that the replacement router has plenty of air flow on all sides.

                        New routers often come with auto setup programs that will talk to the cable modem, pc and router to get the right info.

                        Dan
                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lazlo
                          Yes, they definitely go bad. If everything was working, and you didn't change any of your desktop or laptop settings, one possibility is that your service provider changed your IP address, and you have the router set for static IP.

                          I wouldn't suggest changing the router settings if you're not comfortable with them, but look at the DHCP settings on the router and on the desktop.
                          +1
                          ISPs frequently change IP addresses upstream and may do this whether you are using static or dynamic IP. And DHCP settings between the router and the computer can get screwed up.

                          Suppose your router is configured at 192.168.0.1 and your modem is configured at 192.168.2.1 (192.168.1.1 is common).

                          sometimes your connection is ok, but DNS (name service) is screwed up. Here are a few IP addresses you can try with ping:
                          77.14.204.99 www.google.com
                          69.223.24.78 bbs.homeshopmachinst.net


                          These examples were done on linux. The same utilities exist on pretty much every desktop operating system but the windoze versions have been butchered. I have highlighted the commands and the most pertinent info returned.

                          Code:
                          $ ping 192.168.0.1                # test if computer can talk to router
                          PING 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
                          64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=250 time=0.745 ms
                          64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=250 time=0.728 ms
                             # after you see a few response lines like these two, or have waited 30 seconds,
                             # press control-c to exit.
                          ^C  
                          --- 192.168.0.1 ping statistics ---
                          2 packets transmitted, 2 received, 0% packet loss, time 999ms
                          rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.728/0.736/0.745/0.028 ms
                          
                          $ ping 192.168.2.1         # test if computer can talk to modem
                          PING 192.168.2.1 (192.168.2.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
                          64 bytes from 192.168.2.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=253 time=2.24 ms
                          64 bytes from 192.168.2.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=253 time=2.20 ms
                          ^C
                          --- 192.168.2.1 ping statistics ---
                          2 packets transmitted, 2 received, 0% packet loss, time 1001ms
                          rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 2.201/2.223/2.245/0.022 ms
                          
                          # find route to www.google.com
                          $ traceroute 77.14.204.99              # www.google.com
                          traceroute to 77.14.204.99 (77.14.204.99), 30 hops max, 60 byte packets
                           1  192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1)  1.101 ms  1.370 ms  1.663 ms
                           2  192.168.2.1 (192.168.2.1)  4.869 ms  6.678 ms  8.205 ms
                           3  va-67-76-175-1.sta.embarqhsd.net (67.76.175.1)  62.938 ms  65.608 ms  67.062 ms
                           4  va-65-173-90-21.sta.embarqhsd.net (65.173.90.21)  68.467 ms  70.413 ms  71.430 ms
                           5  host.lightcore.net (208.110.248.241)  82.416 ms  83.868 ms  85.312 ms
                           6  te9-3-0d0.cir1.ashburn-va.us.xo.net (216.156.116.29)  85.981 ms  65.290 ms  65.844 ms
                           7  vb2000d1.rar3.washington-dc.us.xo.net (207.88.13.62)  70.444 ms  73.058 ms  73.477 ms
                           8  ae0d0.cir1.amsterdam2-nh.nl.xo.net (207.88.13.197)  155.634 ms  156.666 ms  158.531 ms
                           9  * * *
                          10  * * *
                          11  * * *
                          12  * * *
                          13  * * *
                          14  * * *
                          15  * * *
                          16  * * *
                          17  * * *
                          18  * * *
                          19  * * *
                          20  * * *
                          21  * * *
                          22  * * *
                          23  * * *
                          24  * * *
                          25  * * *
                          26  * * *
                          27  * * *
                          28  * * *
                          29  * * *
                          30  * * *
                          
                          # Windoze abreviates the name to something like tracert
                          # sometimes you need to use the -I option on traceroute as the type of 
                          # packet it uses by default is blocked
                          # In this case, it did not show the route all the way to google but it does 
                          # show us part way through.
                          # third response is particularly useful as this is the router on the other side
                          # of your connection
                          
                          # see if we can resolve the name www.google.com to an ip address.
                          $ nslookup www.google.com
                          Server:		208.33.159.39
                          Address:	208.33.159.39#53
                          
                          Non-authoritative answer:
                          www.google.com	canonical name = www.l.google.com.
                          Name:	www.l.google.com
                          Address: 72.14.204.104
                          Name:	www.l.google.com
                          Address: 72.14.204.99
                          Name:	www.l.google.com
                          Address: 72.14.204.147
                          Name:	www.l.google.com
                          Address: 72.14.204.103
                          
                          # on windoze, use ipconfig as well and you need to use an option 
                          # to give detailed information
                          $ ifconfig
                                   # in this case, this first entry is the one for the ethernet interface.
                          eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:14:85:ed:f4:61  
                                    inet addr:192.168.0.3  Bcast:192.168.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
                                    inet6 addr: fe80::214:85ff:feed:f461/64 Scope:Link
                                    UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
                                    RX packets:3710535 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
                                    TX packets:2347196 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                                    collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
                                    RX bytes:4549244358 (4.5 GB)  TX bytes:264311293 (264.3 MB)
                                    Interrupt:23 
                          
                          lo        Link encap:Local Loopback  
                                    inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
                                    inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
                                    UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
                                    RX packets:149370 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
                                    TX packets:149370 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                                    collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
                                    RX bytes:49680784 (49.6 MB)  TX bytes:49680784 (49.6 MB)
                          
                          virbr0    Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr f2:90:de:12:d1:ad  
                                    inet addr:192.168.122.1  Bcast:192.168.122.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
                                    inet6 addr: fe80::f090:deff:fe12:d1ad/64 Scope:Link
                                    UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
                                    RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
                                    TX packets:310 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                                    collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
                                    RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)  TX bytes:28923 (28.9 KB)
                          
                          $ route
                          Kernel IP routing table
                          Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
                          192.168.0.0     *               255.255.255.0   U     1      0        0 eth0
                          192.168.122.0   *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 virbr0
                          link-local      *               255.255.0.0     U     1000   0        0 eth0
                          default         192.168.0.1     0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth0
                          
                          # this says that the default route (used to connect to distant sites) is 192.168.0.1 (the wireless router).
                          You can usually use the web based configuration of your router and modem by using http://192.168.0.1/ and http://192.168.1.1/ or http://192.168.2.1/. You will need the passwords. It should have traceroute and ping and other diagnostics.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by whitis
                            sometimes your connection is ok, but DNS (name service) is screwed up.
                            I've seen this several times and until I changed my own router recently it happened regularly to me. You can get connected physically, can ping IP's, but you cannot get any DNS resolution. Each time I've seen it there has been more than one device connected through the router, re-booting the device cures it for a while then DNS stops working again.

                            The cure has always been the same - find out your ISP's DNS server IP's and put them into TCP/IP properties on every machine using the router.

                            From the description here this isn't the issue though, it sounds like a bad router or a bad cat5 lead. Thelead is easy to check - try another. If the router is issuing IP addresses then it's working at least partly and you need to get into the setup to check some settings.
                            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                            Monarch 10EE 1942

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              While it isn't as common as your router going bad, your network interface card or onboard jack can go bad too. Last year I had to put a network card in my current PC because the onboard nic died.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X