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How should I move a Bridgeport w/Boss IV

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  • How should I move a Bridgeport w/Boss IV

    I do not want to pay a rigger, so any other suggestions ?

    The shop is about a foot higher than street level. The last time the owner sold one he said the guy backed a tilt trailer up to the floor and used a block and tackle to pull it onto the trailer. Seems reasonable but I am worried about it being top heavy. I know I can tilt the head to help alleviate that problem.

    Also I am not sure how I would get it off the trailer at my house. I don't have a forklift or a hoist, just a 2 ton shop crane.

    The second problem is my garage door is only 7ft so I don't think I could slide it through with out some type of dis assembly. So maybe I should just disassemble it on site and not have to worry about it tipping.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Kevin

  • #2
    Does it have the original controls? The original tape-drive? If so I'd move it with EXPLOSIVES or liquify it with THERMITE and recast it into something useful.
    This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
    Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
    Plastic Operators Dot Com

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    • #3
      I second that, the old Boss control is not worth scrapping. You can buy a current CNC for a song and dance right now. Better hurry, when the administration changes in 2012 the prices will start going up.

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      • #4
        I have two of them right now. Both of them I tried to run as-is, one I had professionally converted.

        I could have had a new mill for the same price. I plan to scrap 'em both when I finish paying for the conversion.
        This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
        Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
        Plastic Operators Dot Com

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        • #5
          I got it to convert to a more modern CNC. It has all the old controls which I will remove and put on servos or steppers and drivers and then hook it up to a PC running Mach 3. So for $2000 I have a pretty stout CNC mill for the price of a new Sherline. What's wrong with that ?

          P.S. If I want this abuse I will post on PM. ;-)

          P.S.S. Where are all the modern CNC machines going for a song a dance ? The cheapest I have seen with that envelope is $5000 and no tooling.
          Last edited by KiloBravo; 10-10-2010, 07:13 PM.

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          • #6
            Where are all the modern CNC machines going for a song a dance
            YEAH, No kidding.
            Where can I find these mythical, inexpensive CNC's?

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            • #7
              Moving

              I've moved everything in my shop except the CNC mill (6000 lb.) with an engine hoist. it works great for getting a machine off the trailer because the feet go under the trailer. Also, you are picking up the machine from the top which is a lot safer than trying to move it by the bottom. I raised mine up off the trailer, drove the trailer out from under the machine, then lowered the machine down on the legs with 2x8s while keeping some tension on the lift on top. At that point you can roll it wherever you want it.
              Kansas City area

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kben77
                So for $2000 I have a pretty stout CNC mill for the price of a new Sherline. What's wrong with that ?
                As long as you know what you are getting into, that's all.

                P.S. If I want this abuse I will post on PM. ;-)
                Whoa there friend, lets not hit below the belt.

                P.S.S. Where are all the modern CNC machines going for a song a dance ? The cheapest I have seen with that envelope is $5000 and no tooling.
                Your Old Dog has a back yard full of late model Haas machines, he runs them until the sump fills up with chips... then he tosses 'em and buys new. Offer him some fiber-glass rod he'll send you a couple of mills cheap.
                This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
                Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
                Plastic Operators Dot Com

                Comment


                • #9
                  I slid my Series 1 on pipe and across the floor without anything as well. Pipe makes it easy. Although, the series 1 has a large sheetmetal box on the side which can get in the way when using pipe, but its still possible.

                  They seem top heavy but they are not bad. YET, you still need to be careful and watch what you are doing.

                  If you have a truck and a trailer rated for that load, back up to the place and pull it onto the trailer. As for removing it, I backed my truck into the shop and ran a chainfall to just outside the opposite door with a beam that spanned the concrete.

                  I was able to pull it off a drop deck trailer without issues. Just watch and think through every move you make.

                  rock~

                  Edit - Here is a link to a drill press move I did a while back. This was a bit more top heavy than the mill. Drill press move Please note, when I pull a machine off the trailer, the chain is around a very low point, this helps reduce the tipping. I have also lashed the top of many a machine to the truck and slowly worked them off a trailer. It takes more time because you have to let the top rigging out as the machine takes up the slack and it only helps against a tip over, it does not prevent a tip over.
                  Last edited by rockrat; 10-10-2010, 07:40 PM.
                  Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                  • #10
                    Ok, one more thing and I'll stop for now. I just couldnt remember where I had the photos of this stuff.

                    Look over this link. I have photos and video of the day I moved a mill into the shop.

                    Rockrats mill move album

                    rock~
                    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                    • #11
                      You'd be amazed what you can do with a backhoe and some stout chain or better yet straps. Get a friend with one or pay someone for a little time to lift and move it for you.
                      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" Thomas Edison

                      Better to have tools you don't need than to need tools you don't have

                      73's KB3BFR

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rockrat
                        Ok, one more thing and I'll stop for now. I just couldnt remember where I had the photos of this stuff.

                        Look over this link. I have photos and video of the day I moved a mill into the shop.

                        Rockrats mill move album

                        rock~
                        Rockrat, Thanks that is just what I needed to see.

                        A question, the floor of the guys shop is actually about a foot above the street. Can that trailer tilt with the jack on the front ? It looks like you can tilt to any angle with that. I would have to back it up to his floor and then pull it into the back of the trailer. Should be possible ?

                        Only problem with my garage is it has a 7 foot opening so I think the machine is closer to 8 feet. Hoe tall is your garage door opening ?

                        Thanks,
                        Kevin

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                        • #13
                          rock, your text refers to the box on the side (cnc) but the pics look like a manual mill??

                          I think the series 1 cnc is bigger and heavier than the regular bridgeport, certainly taller. I've taken mine for walks lots of times, its a heavy one but doable doing the Egyptian (rollers and pry bars). A 1' drop is a big concern, might be worth having a forklift there....unless the trailer is the right height and you block underneath etc.....its a lot of machine and top heavy.

                          I had the same challenge getting mine in...the rigid ram means you're talking the top off - varispeed drive and pulleys. Basically start at the top and work your way down, On mine I had to drop the motor but not remove it...that should get you under 7'
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mcgyver
                            rock, your text refers to the box on the side (cnc) but the pics look like a manual mill??
                            I should clear the air on that. I have one of each. The manual mill photos are of a recent move. I used the same trailer and rigging to move my series 1 cnc.

                            The trailer deck height? I dont know for sure but I bet it is very close to 1' if not a bit over.

                            1' can be dealt with. What I would do in that situation is take enough dunnage or cribbing with me so that I could back the trailer up onto a few wood planks. This will raise your trailer height and since most trailer decks are nearly 8"-10" off the ground you don't have far to go. 2 - 2x10's per side would be more than enough. Take enough that you can get some under the truck tires if needed to keep things level.

                            Place the 2" x 10" with the 10" flat on the ground and just behind the trailer tires. You will need a bag of sand on each board for the trailer to keep the board from moving as you back onto it.

                            If there are no sand bags, make the boards long enough that they touch the dock/building and still allow a few feet for the trailer to be on them.

                            I have done this numerous times with good success.

                            As for the height of the garage door at the home shop, 7' is about the limit so long as your machine is not a rigid head type. I tilted the head down on my machine to get it into the old shops 7' garage door. This was the first move without the drop trailer, thats why the forklift is there.


                            Click for larger photo.


                            rock~
                            Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                            • #15
                              Need to drop a trailer down a bit? Well, let the air out of the tires or.... dig a few holes.

                              I had dad help with a Van Norman. We needed to drop the trailer down a bit to get the machine off. We fired up the tiller and dug out holes to back the trailer tires into. Put the back end into the dirt and made moving the mill easy without a forklift.

                              Just make sure that the trailer will end up with the back side where you want it. Pulling it out without a 4x4 might be a challenge when the weight is still on there.

                              Click for larger photo.
                              Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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