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What constitutes a home machinist?

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  • What constitutes a home machinist?

    I guess it would be anyone who works with machines that are on their residential premises.

    But I once had my machine(tool) usage set up remotely and isolated for easy transition away from the comforts of home and into the "shop". All ability to interact with the comforts of "home" on a multi-daily frequency was reduced to driving for miles and expending precious time and resources. Although some tools were kept at my residence, they didn't constitute a shop as most were basic and redundant in nature.

    Then there are those of us who professionally are "machinists" and work at a business location, but maintain a well equiped working laboratory under or closely around with a more sophisticated collection of machines.

    All in all, we simply collect, install, operate, maintain and upgrade our working environment while optionally including our more "personal' home experiences.

    Right now, my home shop feels lacking. With my interest in the Gearotic program growing, and a need for a gear, I'm looking to install another piece to my collection by constructing an extra adjustble axis. It's almost embarrassing that I haven't already done this.

    What's the next machine that would most benefit the shops of you guys(gals) out there?
    Last edited by Deja Vu; 10-13-2010, 09:26 AM.
    John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

  • #2
    New Band Saw

    Originally posted by Deja Vu
    What's the next machine that would most benefit the shops of you guys(gals) out there?
    I took delivery on a new vertical band saw last week. It is a metal and wood cutting saw to replace a small wood only cutting saw. Anyone interestd in a good 10 inch wood cutting band saw for $75?
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BigBoy1
      to replace a small wood only cutting saw. Anyone interestd in a good 10 inch wood cutting band saw for $75?
      I need to see a picture of it before any further thought of attempting acquisition!

      What is its throat? Can you use a metal-cutting band on it? Is the speed not adjustable to lower ranges? Is the frame weak and susceptible to flex? Or is it just a wimpy machine?
      John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

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      • #4
        What constitutes a home machinist?
        I live in my shop. I have no living room, but a bed room, a mess .. er .. "kitchen" and a mess .. er .. "office".
        So I am a home&shop-machinist.

        What's the next machine that would most benefit the shops of you guys(gals) out there?
        A planer, 2..3 m stroke. But only after the "kitchen" has moved to a new room, making place for new machinery.



        Nick

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        • #5
          My next machine will be a mill and hopefully this winter. Milling with the milling attachment on the 10" atlas lathe just takes awhile sometimes.
          Andy

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Deja Vu
            What's the next machine that would most benefit the shops of you guys(gals) out there?
            Realistic: Surface Grinder.
            Unrealistic: Centerless Grinder.

            Neither is gonna happen, though. I have a lathe with a toolpost grinder that basically fills in for both of the above... or at least the former, but with very small capacity (I have a ∅4" magnetic chuck).
            Why? I'm a HSM. That is, my shop is in a relatively small, unfinished area of my finished basement; and I've ran out of room. If I were to "make" room, it would be too much trouble having abrasive machines in close proximity to my mill, lathe, drill, etc. for my tastes.

            After both of the above, I would rank a Heat Treating Furnace. That, though, may be in my cards for the future
            Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 10-13-2010, 11:17 AM.

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            • #7
              Space! i'm making more space! Some go to the gym. I just walk around the corner of the home.
              Hey! it's not the digging so much as is where to put all the topsoil, sand and then the four feet of clay.
              ...will use a sod cutter to roll back the sod and put some of the "fill" under it.

              nother problem... bedrock with just a foot to go for depth. I'm looking into shwedges for breaking it up.
              This should be cleared sometime late summer next year.

              Let's see..along with that space will require a winch, hoist, or more basic lift system. I have the basic lift system already.


              ...
              Last edited by Deja Vu; 10-13-2010, 11:47 AM.
              John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

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              • #8
                John, that looks more like a grave going under an addition. You thinking divorce is too expensive?
                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Black Forest
                  John, that looks more like a grave going under an addition. You thinking divorce is too expensive?
                  Heh! Funny you should say that. Several people walking along the curb asked who i was burying. I said it is so i can get everything out of the basement when "that time" draws nearer. Right now it would be a nightmare for my wife (or anyone else for the matter). I've built things that can only be extracted by disassembly and loss of tedious alignment.

                  As it is now, just trying to get a 4x8 aheet of material downstairs is difficult. It's easy to slide things down than bring them up without mentioning the angles involved.
                  But when i get the lift(elevator) installed on the adjoining pocket, all things in the basement shouldrise up effortlessly.

                  Imagine too for sawdust control.... raise the saw up on the platform, do the sawing and quickly lower it before the rain starts. As it is now, I have the metal machines at the other end of the basement with plastic hung to hold down the dust migration.
                  Last edited by Deja Vu; 10-13-2010, 12:10 PM.
                  John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

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                  • #10
                    You are Hard Core, Nick!

                    Originally posted by MuellerNick
                    I live in my shop. I have no living room, but a bed room, a mess .. er .. "kitchen" and a mess .. er .. "office".
                    So I am a home&shop-machinist.
                    I have a lathe and three mills stuffed in at home. An upgrade in the saw department is a must as I found a nice (seemingly) little Atlas Clausing affair this past summer for $100. The final tweaking to get it working is going quite slowly, though.

                    I do quite a bit of boring & non descript work at home for my company so I am in the gray area between HSM and something else.

                    I guess I have to call myself a "guy who can do some machining" since I am not technically employed as a machinist nor have I had any formal training.
                    I bury my work

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                    • #11
                      How many of us have had formal training?

                      [QUOTE=recoilless
                      --------------
                      I guess I have to call myself a "guy who can do some machining" since I am not technically employed as a machinist nor have I had any formal training.[/QUOTE]

                      I equate home shop machinists as folks who do this as amateurs. The term, deriving from words for "lover", reflects a voluntary motivation to work as a result of personal interest in the activity. ( definition lifted from Wikipedia) It has nothing to do with the quality of the work produced.

                      So we do this because we want to, not just as a means of making a living. Obviously some here do both, but I bet most subscribers to HSM are hobbyists with little or no formal training. I worked in a university machine shop one summer while I was a student many years ago, that's the total of my training. Books, magazines and the internet are my only resources for information now. When I was working I often hung around the machine shop to pick up some hints and tricks.

                      So how many here are formally trained machinists?

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                      • #12
                        I was trained by the US Army in airframe repair. That isn't machining but does include a large subset of the tools found in a metal working shop. I have been working with metal since I was a child and was wishing for a lathe when I was ten. I took some machine shop classes in high school and have jobs in welding and lathe work as well as aircraft metalwork. I also know how to run a glass lathe and do elementary scientific glass blowing as well as plenty of practical experience in sheet glass work. I also studied metal casting via courses in art metal work at the California College of Arts and Crafts. I hung out at the machine shop at the Lawerence National Lab when I was in my early teens since my father was doing research there.

                        However, I have never had a job where I was classfied as a machinist.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Deja Vu
                          Hey! it's not the digging so much as is where to put all the topsoil,
                          sand and then the four feet of clay.
                          May I suggest that you view Mr Sturges' 1963 WWII POW epic,
                          'The Great Escape' for inspiration ...

                          .

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                          • #14
                            You are not a "home machinist" until you spend 19 hours, seven setups and $1,600 in tooling and material to make something that you could get at the hardware store for a dollar.


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                            • #15
                              To me a home shop machinist is primarily a hobbiest doing some machining but if a little pay job rolls in an helps fund the next acquisition, you're not disqualified.

                              I don't have any metal-working stuff at my home. Everything lives at my dad's shop that's in his walk-in cellar, only 7.5 miles from me. Lathe, Bridgeport, surface grinder, horizontal bandsaw, drill press, tons of tooling and inspection stuff.

                              While the next thing I'd like to add would be wire EDM, I have to replace the clapped-out Bridgeport with something nicer first. In my dreams that would be done with a Deckel FP3CNC.

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