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Standard Modern Series 4000

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  • #16
    I cringe whenever I see a lathe where the maker has increased centre height simply by adding riser blocks...

    It just does not look right...
    Precision takes time.

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    • #17
      I think probably a good arbitrator on how 'good' something is is price, get what you pay for sort of thing. The typical SM that you'd see in the schools was mid to high teens, or so i've been told. If get what you pay for holds true, then that implies superior quality to today's 5k Asian lathes but not in the league of a Monarch, DSG, smart & Brown Hardinge etc - these lathes were magnitudes more money, much heavy, more powerful and with more options...apples to oranges to compare them

      btw, the current SM is not the SM of old, they were out of business for the better part of a decade I believe. Same name but i doubt same people and certainly not the same facility.....for all i know they could be superior, but whatever SM is producing today doesn't have much to do with the used SM's you encounter and vise versa
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ammcoman2
        My Series 2000 1120 was made in 1968 and one can see the family lineage. I gather from the Tony Griffith site that these are 17" swing lathes. So that must be a reallllly short bed. 1720 perhaps?

        Geoff
        I was assuming the 26 maybe implied 13" swing.

        I am told it has 28" between the chuck and the tail stock as it sits in the pictures. Supposedly a 3HP motor.

        I will take more pics when I go look at it on Friday.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by toyjeep73
          QUOTE=Mcgyver]Standard Modern are a well made engine lathe with many others occupying the ranks above |(and at high price points) its a well made solid mid range engine lathe.....very good for what it is, but far from top of the line....it just doesn't have the bells and whistles the best lathes have

          if you're cutting a .003" taper in 6" that is a poorly set up lathe or a very worn one, not a hallmark of SM
          Glad to hear some more positive. I will be looking at it (and the entire mobile shop) next Friday. The price is RIGHT on this one, so all I needed to figure out is if it is worth the effort to move and store.

          FWIW I have conviced someone to let me park this on their property untill i sort out how to remove the good stuff, or untill I move somewhere I can park it in my yard .... :grumble about HOA:

          I can't wait to move ... :grumble more:[/QUOTE]

          My suggestion for moving the trailer is to find someone with a lowloader and put your trailer on it and you can take it anywhere ,no road worthy or other things required.
          Pity about the restrictions in your neighbourhood. That looks like a great setup.
          Michael

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          • #20
            I went and saw the lathe in person today. Its a little bigger than I thought. There was an empty keg there that I added to the picture for scale:







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            • #21






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              • #22






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                • #23
                  I did not think to see how small the 4-jaw chuck would close, but with a max rpm of 1,000, how usefull will this really be in the hobby environment?

                  Can a single phase motor that turns double the speed be swapped in and effectively double the speed of the lathe. I doubt I will be turning anything big enough diamater to require 25 rpm.

                  Any guesses on weight? 5000 lb maybe?
                  Last edited by toyjeep73; 10-29-2010, 09:09 PM.

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                  • #24
                    120 or so people have looked at this ... does no one have an opinion?

                    It will cost me well over $1k to move it and get it hooked up .....

                    I guess I should be blount .... Am I better off buying some halfass 10" SB that has seen 50 years of use for the same price, or should I go through the trouble of getting this thing out of the trailer it is in and into my garage? I am reasonably new to the whole HSM community/hobby but I liked what I did do on my 10" clapped out Atlas .... I just don't want to go through the trouble to move this beast and then learn that as a "hobbiest" it is all but useless.

                    Can it do smallish work? I know it is designed to fix tanks and other large military vehicles. I always did work on slow because I was learning, but this is a practically new machine that I could use for 50+ yrs. IS IT TOO SLOW?

                    It appears simple enough in operation, but a lot stronger than what I have used.

                    I am asking for your opinions ......

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by toyjeep73
                      Can it do smallish work? I know it is designed to fix tanks and other large military vehicles. I always did work on slow because I was learning, but this is a practically new machine that I could use for 50+ yrs. IS IT TOO SLOW?

                      It appears simple enough in operation, but a lot stronger than what I have used.

                      I am asking for your opinions ......
                      OK here's mine.

                      Go for it. Even though I own two SB's a 9" and a 14 1/2" I would trade both of them for this machine. SM is a much stronger machine than SB. It has virtually zero hours on it so it should be just as good as new. In addition there are tons of work holding accessories and the high speed milling/grinding attachment.

                      I'd recommend getting a collet attachment, or collet chuck to hold small work, which will solve the one issue.

                      As to the speed, I'm assuming (yes I know) it has high speed spindle bearings. Consequently you should be able to devise some way to increase the spindle speed which could be as simple as changing the drive and motor pulleys.

                      My $0.02

                      Stan

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                      • #26
                        I say you have found a gold mine, go for it.
                        If I had an opportunity to get all that gear for my home shop I wouldn't think twice, and it sounds like you have found a storage place which is even better.

                        Dave

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by toyjeep73
                          Can a single phase motor that turns double the speed be swapped in and effectively double the speed of the lathe. I doubt I will be turning anything big enough diamater to require 25 rpm.

                          Any guesses on weight? 5000 lb maybe?
                          A motor swap should be fairly simple, just make sure you keep the same shaft size, most likely 1 1/8" diameter as a 5/8" would not survive the torque.

                          As to the weight I'm thinking 3K to 3.5K lbs but it's better to estimate high rather than low.

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                          • #28
                            At $1000 it's a great buy. If you find it too big (you won't... ), clean it up, and sell it for good money and buy a cheap small import.. err..NOT!

                            It's a 26X30.... not a 9/12/ x x I wouldn't be doubling the speed without great care, and a good look at the bearings, oil system, and new chucks. It makes my 14x40 look tiny... but I'd sure like it in my shop. I have about 29 uses for a short bed big swing lathe... What's the spindle pass though bore? In anycase, leave it as 3 phase and use a VFD to increase the speed.
                            Last edited by lakeside53; 10-30-2010, 12:49 PM.

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                            • #29
                              But it looks like maybe a 17" blocked up to make a 26". What rpm would a 16-17 SM support? It may be that they just changed ratios in the drive to slow it down to speeds reasonable for the larger swing. If so, simply switching to ratios used for the "smaller" lathe would be fine. Spindle tooling will be a bit more problematic due to the (L1?) spindle mount, but looks like you've got several pieces covered. The extra blocked up height won't do any favors for rigidity, but it looks pretty beefy, and still likely far better than something like a 16" SB. And when you do need to face some flange on large a weldment or something, you'll be very glad to have the swing (without having to pull a gap that may still not get you enough room).

                              So I agree, I think I would be all over it for $1000. Though you may find you want a smaller lathe depending on how things work out with tooling and spindle speeds.
                              Russ
                              Master Floor Sweeper

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                              • #30
                                I cringe whenever I see a lathe where the maker has increased centre height simply by adding riser blocks...
                                Could always take the risers out of the tailstock and the toolpost. Might have a problem with the headstock, looks to have been a well disguised, filled and rubbed down joint??

                                Increase spindle speed ?? Yep, but Not with that chuck diameter.

                                Regards Ian
                                You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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