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Standard Modern Series 4000

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  • #31
    That machine is 20x what a SB could ever hope to be.

    I don't see that there would be more than about 15 hours of time to clean up the "Ebay paint job" and rust to get things running again. It appears to be an extremely well-tooled machine with low hours and much capability. I envy you for your good fortune to have acquired it.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Circlip
      Could always take the risers out of the tailstock and the toolpost. Might have a problem with the headstock, looks to have been a well disguised, filled and rubbed down joint??

      Increase spindle speed ?? Yep, but Not with that chuck diameter.

      Regards Ian
      Good idea about removing the risers. As to the chuck, max RPM will be dependent on its material. If it's cast iron (doubtful) 1000 RPM is probably a max safe speed. However, given that it was a US gov purchase its probably steel or semi-steel and could go much faster. One should however, check with the manufacturer of the chuck and the max RPM may be listed on a tag on the chuck.

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      • #33
        I can't say that i have seen a 17" Standard Modern, but this thing seems pretty massive to just be a 17" with a couple spacers.

        Here as a pic of the spindle bore. I did not think to take a tape measure, but it looked about 2"+.



        And the tool post. Lantern style unfortunatly.



        I am sure this is not that large compared to a manufacturing facility, but it all seem spretty big to me compared to my Atlas 10".

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        • #34
          Originally posted by toyjeep73
          I can't say that i have seen a 17" Standard Modern, but this thing seems pretty massive to just be a 17" with a couple spacers.

          Here as a pic of the spindle bore. I did not think to take a tape measure, but it looked about 2"+.
          2" bore is pretty common in a 17" lathe. My 17" with D1-6 nose has a ~2.15" bore. But if you measure the spacer height, double it, and subtract from 26, you should be pretty close to it's original max work diameter over the bed.

          No worries on the lantern, it can be handy in some cases, but the (common) t-slot compound makes it easy to mount an Aloris style or whatever...
          Russ
          Master Floor Sweeper

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          • #35
            On second look removing the risers may not be that simple. The one from the cross slide would be easy, but the one for the tailstock would need to be machined off. One would really need to investigate the head stock to see if lowering would be feasible. Given the solid construction of the machine I'm not sure if lowering/reducing the swing would be worth the effort.

            The lantern style tool post was quite commonly used in the military in the 70's. I did not see a drop in (Alloris) until I reported aboard the Gompers in '75.

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            • #36
              Yeah, I think I would leave it just as it is. Not as rigid as without the spacing, but even with far superior to what most have. And if it's not going to be used to hog down shafts at production rates, it should still be very capable. Have you ever seen those rediculous SB lathes where they make a 26 (or something) out of a 16" lathe? For patterns I think, but yowzer!

              And as for the chuck speed, depends on the chuck. I have an 8" Bison rated for 4000 rpms. But you can always mount a Rubberflex or H-S 5C?
              Russ
              Master Floor Sweeper

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              • #37
                Originally posted by BadDog
                Yeah, I think I would leave it just as it is. Not as rigid as without the spacing, but even with far superior to what most have. And if it's not going to be used to hog down shafts at production rates, it should still be very capable. Have you ever seen those rediculous SB lathes where they make a 26 (or something) out of a 16" lathe? For patterns I think, but yowzer!

                And as for the chuck speed, depends on the chuck. I have an 8" Bison rated for 4000 rpms. But you can always mount a Rubberflex or H-S 5C?
                There is a Rubberflex there. No idea the condition. You can see it on the far right on the rack underneath in the first picture.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by toyjeep73
                  There is a Rubberflex there. No idea the condition. You can see it on the far right on the rack underneath in the first picture.
                  I prefer the Jacobs rubber flex over 5C collets due to the range of each collet. Just need to make sure they have not dry rotted with age, but the chuck itself should be just fine.

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                  • #39
                    There are rubberflex collets on ebay all the time if they need replaced.
                    Kansas City area

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Dr Stan
                      I prefer the Jacobs rubber flex over 5C collets due to the range of each collet. Just need to make sure they have not dry rotted with age, but the chuck itself should be just fine.
                      5C has areas of superiority. Hex, square, pot, and e-collets being among them. And 5C with a lever is FAR faster and more convenient than Rubberflex. Also better for shorter grip lengths, the Rubberflex (which I have) is a real pain if you can't set it at least half collet, and the rubber buttons are only marginally helpful.

                      Still, I have a Rubberflex and do like it for smaller (faster) material. As you state, the range of each collet is great, particularly with odd size material which would otherwise require an e-collet to hold in 5C. Each has it's benefits, and it's nice to have both.
                      Russ
                      Master Floor Sweeper

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                      • #41
                        Followed this home for 6 hours on the interstate yesterday. Getting closer to having it in my garage.

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                        • #42
                          Did you buy the complete package, or only the trailer & lathe?


                          Originally posted by toyjeep73
                          Wrapped up in the big box housing the lathe is also a Powermatic Drill Pess, Hobart Arc Welder, Baldur grinder, 3 hydraulic presses, and a 3-phsae generator to run it all....so I am told.

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                          • #43
                            I got everything.

                            Hoping to pull the lathe/drill press/versamill/shop press and part out the rest to recoup my expenses.

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                            • #44
                              FWIW I spoke to a Standard Modern person a few months back. They still manufacture one manual model, the rest being CNC. I think he said it was a 13X40, it is STILL made entirely in Canada, and it lists for about $15,000.00 Cdn, all tooling extra.
                              Parts and service on all the old models is handled by Leblond, since they bought the rights from SM. Brace yourself for some serious money for parts. As near as I can figure, they actually have only the DRAWINGS, and job out orders to make parts as needed. They seem to keep very few parts in stock.
                              Basically, I think that we can do that as well as Leblond.
                              Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                              • #45
                                That lathe has all the speed you need to do any thing .big are small. its a manual machine ans you don`t run one like a CNC . You slow things down . !000 RPM is faster than you will ever need. I never run any thing over 750 I don`t care how small it is and every things comes out right. I do this every day for a living so I know. most home machinist try to use all the feed and speed charts designed for CNC stuff and have lots of trouble running too fast. Besides you are not in a hurry this is a Hobby. Great package.
                                Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                                http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                                http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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