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  • Blocked Sites

    I get most of this board from work (yeah, I know, I should be working). Big problem I have is that I cannot link to very many web sites, especially photo sites. This doesn't apply at home.

    I sure do appreciate when you guys actually add the photos in the text box. I can see them. Linked photos... not so much. I ask only that if you have an extra minute, please try to insert a pic or two here.

    No biggie- I can wait until I get home, but then I'm on my own time. I much prefer to look at your stuff on company time.

  • #2
    doesn't make a difference for me, if it's from photobucket or youtube, it's blocked.

    so now lets make this a worthwhile conversation. how do i set my web server up to "view and redistribute" the information. Meaning I point to my web server and it has downloaded the information from photobucket and redirected it so I too can view on the company dime...i mean, break time.

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    • #3
      This site doesn't host pictures so is dependent on sites that do for photo inclusion. Those sites are frequently banned by business net nanny firewalls so you're going to miss multimedia content from time to time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by garagemark
        I get most of this board from work (yeah, I know, I should be working). Big problem I have is that I cannot link to very many web sites, especially photo sites.
        You're probably talking about OpenDNS, which a lot of corporations, including Nvidia, use.

        I find it irritating that they allow Photobucket, but for some reason most other image hosting services (Imageshack, etc) are blocked. That sounds suspiciously like a financial arrangement. OpenDNS also blocks John Stevenson's download folder, which is bizarre.

        In any event, you can bypass OpenDNS by putting the name resolution in your local hosts file.
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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        • #5
          In any event, you can bypass OpenDNS by putting the name resolution in your local hosts file.
          On a work computer? I doubt the hosts file is on the local machine. Even if it is fiddling with it is a good way to get in deep shlt with the IT people at most companies.

          What you can do is to proxy the page through Google. Right click on the icon for the first unavailable image in the thread. Then open Google in another tab and go to Google image search. Put in the URL for the image and the page for the image will be the first item it finds in the images. Click on that and Google will proxy the entire thread in a frame. I am not sure it will work but it is worth a try.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Evan
            On a work computer? I doubt the hosts file is on the local machine.
            Every OS written in the last 20 years has a local HOSTS file that overrides the DNS lookup. That includes Windows, MacOS, Linux, FreeBSD...

            An even easier way is to just not use OpenDNS -- use Google's free DNS service:

            Open Network Connections, Open TCP/IP Properties, Select "Use the following DNS Server Addresses" and type in a different DNS server.

            For Google's Free DNS, that's 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4

            Even if it is fiddling with it is a good way to get in deep shlt with the IT people at most companies.
            You may irritate the admin at some companies, but my current employer (which is a Fortune 100 company) could care less.

            Originally posted by Evan
            What you can do is to proxy the page through Google. Right click on the icon for the first unavailable image in the thread. Then open Google in another tab and go to Google image search. Put in the URL for the image and the page for the image will be the first item it finds in the images. Click on that and Google will proxy the entire thread in a frame.
            LOL! A much simpler way: use Google Translate.

            Open translate.google.com. Type in "Imageshack.us" (or HSM Forum, or...) and translate any language other than English. Then click "Original Page" at the top right corner of the screen. Congrats -- you've bypassed OpenDNS.

            You can make a shortcut if you like:

            http://www.google.com/translate?hl=e...pmachinist.net

            or

            http://www.google.com/translate?hl=e....imageshack.us
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              I always had my ISP's DNS servers set up in my TCP/IP properties.

              Then, a few weeks ago, this OpenDNS stuff kept rearing its ugly head.

              Finally looked in my TCP/IP settings and some bas***d of a program had managed to get in there and change it all to the OpenDNS server.

              Only thing I can think of was when a Firefox update crept in. Usually I use Task Manager to kill FF if I see it wants to update. Once it got through. (Got all the FF update stuff set to off in about:config, but it ignores that nowadays and does its own thing).

              On the OP's problem, I always stuff my pictures into my free web space with my ISP. If more of us did that, there's be less blocking.
              Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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              • #8
                Meh, Iv found my local ISP's dns blocking a few websites... One for motorized bicycles, Very weird.
                oddly enough, if I manualy ping the website, it gives me an IP, And then the website works.. for a couple hours. ended up switching to google DNS.
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                • #9
                  Every OS written in the last 20 years has a local HOSTS file that overrides the DNS lookup. That includes Windows, MacOS, Linux, FreeBSD...
                  On a Windows network it is standard practice for IT to create a group policy file that makes the workstation download the hosts file from the server every time it boots. The hosts file will be read only. This even applies to Windows 98 as well as all versions of NT. Group policies can override evrything thing that is usually available on a workstation. They can even lock down the screen colours and make just about any setting or adjustment window disappear.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Networks today use passive proxying. No changes are made to the individual PC - the routing is done at the network layer and all your traffic coming and going over the company network is passed through the nanny. There are still ways around this by using tunneling.

                    This is often done using ssh (PuTTy on windows) to create an encrypted session between your PC at work and an external server. The tunnel is simply a defined port on your PC that connects to a proxy server running on the remote server. You then tell your IE browser to use your localhostort (the tunnel) as a proxy. All your net traffic then travels encrypted across through the tunnel unseen by the nanny. All that is known is the volume of traffic as mysterious bits come and go but the content is undecipherable.

                    Generally speaking, anyone caught tunneling is promptly marched the door and handed a pink slip.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dp
                      Generally speaking, anyone caught tunneling is promptly marched the door and handed a pink slip.
                      Is this a small company you're talking about?

                      I know a ton of folks at the various big semiconductor companies, and it's very common to ssh tunnel DAAP to stream iTunes, port 139 to have access to Windows shares on your home server, ...

                      In fact, I don't think I've ever heard of an engineer being walked for any IT violation short of printing-out porn or industrial espionage.
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                      • #12
                        My company for one, computer / Internet policy is very strict and any porn/gambling/IM, etc. is specified as grounds for termination.

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                        • #13
                          Are you working in a PCI compliance environment? Working with credit cards, HIPPA information, and financials for publicly held corps changes the rules. Same where there's a lot of important IP laying around the net.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dp
                            Same where there's a lot of important IP laying around the net.
                            LOL -- yeah, never worked around important intellectual property. I just design microprocessors
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lazlo
                              LOL -- yeah, never worked around important intellectual property. I just design microprocessors
                              Now you know why AMD got to 64-bits first!

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